COMMISSION STAFF WORKING PAPER Commission Staff Working Paper on the Implementation of the European Union Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region - Part 1 - EU monitor

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COUNCIL OF Brussels, 16 September 2011 THE EUROPEAN UNION (OR. en)

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COVER NOTE from: Secretary-General of the European Commission,

signed by Mr Jordi AYET PUIGARNAU, Director

date of receipt: 14 September 2011 to: Mr Uwe CORSEPIUS, Secretary-General of the Council of the European

Union

No Cion doc.: SEC(2011) 1071 final

Subject: COMMISSION STAFF WORKING PAPER

Commission Staff Working Paper on the Implementation of the European

Union Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region - Part 1

Delegations will find attached Commission document SEC(2011) 1071 final.

________________________ Encl.: SEC(2011) 1071 final

EUROPEAN COMMISSION

Brussels, 13.9.2011 SEC(2011) 1071 final

COMMISSION STAFF WORKING PAPER

Commission Staff Working Paper on the implementation of the European Union Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region

Part 1

DISCLAIMER

This document is a summary of the implementation reports sent to the European Commission by the Priority Area Coordinators, Horizontal Action Leaders, Flagship Project Leaders and relevant Operational Programmes involved in the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region. As such it updates the 2010 Annotated Action Plan, which can be accessed from the Strategy's homepage.

In compiling this document, the Commission Services underline the responsibility of the partners above in providing reliable texts, and have not conducted any substance evaluation concerning the validity or relevance of the information provided. The contents are published in the interest of transparency. They do not necessarily reflect the Commission Services' opinion and the Commission Services accept no responsibility for the various statements made.

The implementation reports were received on 15 March 2011, and reflect the state of play as of that date. The reports can be accessed from the Strategy's homepage.

Table of Contents

Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 4

Chapter 1: a description of the organisational structure set up for the implementation of the Strategy .......................................................................................................................... 5

1.1. At European Union level ................................................................................................. 5 1.2. At EU Member-States level ............................................................................................. 5 1.3. At Baltic Sea Region level ............................................................................................... 5 1.4. At regional and local level ............................................................................................... 6

Chapter 2: Annotated action plan of the European Union Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region ....................................................................................................................................... 8

Pillar 1: to make the Baltic Sea Region an environmentally sustainable place ........... 9 PA 1: To reduce nutrient inputs to the sea to acceptable levels 9

PA 2: To preserve natural zones and biodiversity, including fisheries 15

PA 3: To reduce the use and impact of hazardous substances 20

PA 4: To become a model region for clean shipping 28

PA 5: To mitigate and adapt to climate change 34

Pillar 2: To make the Baltic Sea Region a prosperous place ........................................ 39 PA 6: To remove hindrances to the internal market in the Baltic Sea Region including to

improve cooperation in the customs and tax area 39

PA 7: To exploit the full potential of the region in research and innovation 46

PA 8: Implementing the Small Business Act: to promote entrepreneurship, strengthen SMEs and increase the efficient use of human resources 52

PA 9: To reinforce sustainability of agriculture, forestry and fisheries 60

Pillar 3: To make the Baltic Sea Region an accessible and attractive place .............. 70 PA 10: To improve the access to, and the efficiency and security of the energy markets 70

PA 11: To improve internal and external transport links 77

PA 12: To maintain and reinforce attractiveness of the Baltic Sea Region in particular through education and youth, tourism, culture and health 86

Pillar 4: To make the Baltic Sea Region a safe and secure place .............................. 102 PA 13: To become a leading region in maritime safety and in security 102

PA 14: To reinforce maritime accident response capacity protection from major emergencies 112

PA 15: To decrease the volume of, and harm done by, cross border crime 115 Horizontal Actions ............................................................................................................ 120 Annex: HELCOM actions and corresponding actions under the Action Plan for the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region ..................................................................................... 132

Chapter 3: a presentation of the contribution of the structural funds programmes ... 175 3.1 Contributions by country and by programme for convergence and competitiveness areas ................................................................................................................................... 176 3.1.1. Denmark 177

3.1.2. Estonia 180

3.1.3. Finland 189

3.1.4. Germany 203

3.1.5. Latvia 212

3.1.6. Lithuania 221

3.1.7. Poland 228

3.1.8. Sweden 263

3.2 Contributions by programme for European territorial cooperation areas …………...…275 3.2.1. Crossborder programmes 276

3.3.2. Transnational and Interregional programmes 310 3.4 Other programmes ....................................................................................................... 316

3.4.1. European Social fund programmes 316

3.4.2 European Investment Bank contribution 319

Introduction

This document comes in support of the first official report to the Council, the European Parliament and other institutions, on the implementation of the European Union Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region, adopted in June 2011.

It aims at providing more detailed information concerning the implementation of the Strategy. It is based on the numerous and comprehensive contributions the Commission has received from National Contact Points, Priority Area Coordinators, operational programmes managing authorities and other interested parties.

The chapters are:

  • 1. 
    a description of the organisational structure set up for the implementation of the Strategy; 2. a summary of the implementation of the Action Plan of the Strategy, describing the progress of the different actions and flagship projects;
  • 3. 
    a presentation of the contribution of the Structural Funds programmes:

    • by country and by programme for convergence and competitiveness programmes,

    • by strand and by programme for European territorial cooperation programmes by fund.

More information on the Strategy and its Priority Areas, including contact lists, can be found on the Strategy website: http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/cooperation/baltic/index_en.htm .

Chapter 1: a description of the organisational structure set up for the implementation of the Strategy

The governance structure of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region has the task of coordinating the many actors and organisations involved.

1.1. At European Union level

In the Commission, DG Regional Policy is in charge of the overall coordination, monitoring and reporting to the Council, in close partnership with the other Commission services on topics falling under their competence. An Inter-Service Working Group has been established and meets regularly to ensure coherent and broad support for the Strategy. Officials from various DGs participate actively in meetings, thus providing a link between the Strategy and their policy areas and funding sources. The Commission's delegations in the Region are also instrumental in communication the activities of the Strategy.

The Commission facilitates on-going work on the alignment of funding with the Strategy, in close dialogue with the Managing Authorities of relevant Operational Programmes. In order to support the programmes in identifying their role in the Strategy implementation and define operational responsibilities, management challenges and potentials, the INTERACT Programme established the EUSBSR Laboratory Group in January 2009, which is an informal working group consisting mainly of programme practitioners from the Member States involved. The group is set up to seek operative solutions to identified challenges with consequences for practical programme management.

The Commission has made communication about the Strategy widely available through a targeted website and a bimonthly Newsletter that sets out the latest developments and is disseminated to several thousand subscribers. An Annual Forum is organised to present the Strategy and its achievement to the greater stakeholder community. Input from the Annual Forum feeds into the Commission's annual reporting on the implementation process. The Council is in charge of the broader policy development.

1.2. At EU Member States level

The Pan-European nature of the Strategy is ensured by continuous contact with the EU institutions and advisory bodies and in particular by the use, by the Commission, of a High Level Group of expert advisers on the Strategy, nominated by all Member States.

This group regularly consults the Commission on all major developments. The European Investment Bank is also invited to participate in meetings.

1.3. At Baltic Sea Region level

In the States of the Baltic Sea Region, National Contact Points have been appointed by all participating Member States to assist the implementation of the Strategy at the national level. As part of this process, the Strategy has served to strengthen cooperation mechanisms for Baltic Sea affairs within the participating countries.

In Sweden, a unit has been established within the Prime Minister's Office to coordinate the Swedish contribution. All concerned agencies and implementation authorities have been given specific tasks relating to Sweden's contribution to the Strategy and are required to report on progress once a year.

In Estonia, an inter-ministerial working group headed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs meets four times a year and a core group of four line ministries communicates on a daily basis. Twice a year, a report is presented by the national contact point to the European affairs committee in Estonian Parliament.

In Lithuania, the Parliament has requested the government to present a national action plan related to EUSBSR that has been adopted for the years 2012-2013.

The Danish national coordination group has been praised by local stakeholders for being a good forum for exchanging information and ideas about the implementation of the Strategy.

Priority Area Coordinators are key actors in the implementation of the Strategy. Being the overall contact point for their area in the Region, they have, among other tasks, to facilitate the fulfilment of the goals listed in the Action Plan and to coordinate and monitor the development of the actions and Flagship Projects. They must also facilitate the involvement and cooperation of relevant stakeholders from the entire macro-region, and pursue policy discussions and policy development in the Region. Flagship Project Leaders should pursue a dual role of achieving tangible results and identifying opportunities for policy development.

Horizontal Action Leaders have a key role in ensuring cross-cutting and cross-sectoral links across the Strategy as a whole. Consequently, they should be in regular contact with the Priority Area Coordinators as well as other relevant stakeholders.

Managing Authorities of the programmes in the member-states are key partners. Most of them either have modified, or plan to modify, their national and regional programmes to include a reference to the Strategy and have adopted additional selection criteria to insert EUSBSR into their intervention logic. Sweden has introduced new selection criteria giving priority to projects that are directly linked to the Strategy. In one Finnish regional programme, a priority dedicated to interregional cooperation privileges projects supporting the EUSBSR.

Territorial cooperation programmes are often regarded as more suitable for supporting EUSBSR activities.

As regards other funds or instruments, such as the European Social Fund, the Rural

Development fund and the European Fisheries Fund, but also BONUS programme 1 , they also

bring a significant contribution to the Strategy.

1.4. At regional and local level

The partnership aspect has encouraged an active involvement of a wide range of stakeholders, including EU institutions, international financial institutions, political institutions and organisations 2 ; macro-regional organisations specialised in various policy areas, 3 regional

1 Decision 862/2010/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council on the participation of the Union in a Joint

Baltic Sea Research and Development Programme (BONUS) published in the Official Journal on 30.9.2010 (OJ L 256). Building on the preceding ERA-NET and ERA-NET+ initiatives, BONUS brings together all 8 EU Member States surrounding the Baltic Sea in coordinating and integrating research efforts to address the complex and pressing environmental challenges faced in the Baltic Sea Region.

2 Ex.: European Parliament, Committee of the Regions, European Economic and Social Committee, European

Investment Bank, Nordic Council of Ministers, Baltic Sea Parliamentary Conference, Hanseatic Parliament, Northern Dimension Partnership for Health and Social Wellbeing, Council of the Baltic Sea States

organisations and NGOs 4 , and individual regions and cities. 5 Such organisations provide much expertise. Many, such as the CBSS expert group Baltic 21, BDF, HELCOM and VASAB, are directly responsible for the implementation of various projects and actions listed in the Action Plan. International institutions such as the Nordic Council of Ministers and the Council of the Baltic Sea States significantly give prominence to the Strategy on their political agenda, organising common events and contributing to Flagship Projects. Individual euro-regions, regions, counties and cities also show strong commitment; many are leaders of Priority Areas, Horizontal Actions and/or Flagship Projects

The public representative aspects are facilitated by e.g. the informal Baltic Intergroup, composed of Members of the European Parliament from the Baltic Sea Region and Regional Policy Committee members. This group supports and promotes the work of the Strategy, and was for instance instrumental in allocating MIO 2.5 EUR 6 for everyday organisational assistance. Loans have also been given to various flagship projects by the European and Nordic Investment Banks.

The assistance of the INTERACT office in Turku has proven to be an essential resource for the Strategy.

3 Ex.: HELCOM, VASAB, Baltic Development Forum, Association of Northern German Chambers of

Commerce and Industry, Baltic 21, Baltic Sea Labour Network, Task Force on Organised Crime in the Baltic Sea Region

4 Ex.: Baltic Sea States Sub-regional Co-operation, Baltic Metropoles Network, Euroregion Baltic, Union of

Baltic Cities, Conference of Peripheral Maritime Regions – Baltic Sea Commission, Baltic 7 Islands, Baltic NGO Forum

5 Ex.: Blekinge, Hamburg, Helsinki, Kalmar, Mecklenburg-Vornpommern, Pomorskie, Skane, Southwest

Finland, Västerbotten, Zealand

7

Chapter 2: Annotated Action Plan of the European Union Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region

Pillar 1: To make the Baltic Sea Region an environmentally sustainable place

PA 1: To reduce nutrient inputs to the sea to acceptable levels Coordinated by Poland

and Finland

Brief summary of overall progress:

The importance and relevance of this Priority Area has become even more acute following the publication of the latest pollution load calculation report, which revealed that nutrient inputs to the Baltic Sea have not decreased as expected and that there is still much potential for nutrient reduction, particularly with respect to agriculture but also with regard to municipal waste water treatment. According to HELCOM's assessment of the National Implementation Programmes of the Baltic Sea Action Plan, several countries have undertaken measures to reduce the input of nitrogen and phosphorus, but the overall situation is still unacceptable.

Because of these discouraging findings, the Priority Area has had strong interest from a wide variety of stakeholders, for instance in the form of new project proposals. The Priority Area Coordinators have issued a letter of commitment for a project on cleaner waste water that will be part of an application under the 4th Call of the Baltic Sea Region Programme.

Existing Flagship Projects and Actions are generally progressing well, as testified by the below reports.

The PACs strongly emphasise the importance of establishing lists of national focal points for eutrophication in each EUSBSR country, and of developing clearer guidelines concerning the assessment of Flagship Projects. They are considering the establishment of a Steering Committee for the Priority Area (which it is hoped will strengthen its true macro-regional dimension) and will also work towards strengthening ties especially with Priority Area 9 agriculture.

Both the Finnish and Polish PAC have developed websites for the Priority Area, in Finland: http://www.itameriportaali.fi/en/suojelu/euyhteistyo/en_GB/ensimmainenpainopistealue/ and in Poland: http://www.gios.gov.pl/artykuly/783/The-EU-Strategy-for-the-Baltic-Sea-Region .

Actions:

The PACs point out that the actions of PA 1 are mainly based on EU directives and HELCOM's Baltic Sea Action Plan. Most of the actions are being followed by EU institutions and HELCOM, which is why the PACs have focused on the Flagship Projects. A short contextualisation report is nevertheless provided below.

Strategic actions:

  Implement actions to reduce nutrients”. In addition to the full implementation of the key directives relating to eutrophication, these actions are in the ‘Baltic Sea Action Plan’

(BSAP) of HELCOM 7 . This document contains a specific section on eutrophication and was complemented in March 2009 by thematic reports on the Baltic Sea eutrophication 8 .

Report: This action concerns the full implementation of key directives related to reducing eutrophication and the “Baltic Sea Action Plan” of HELCOM (BSAP) complemented by the HELCOM integrated thematic assessment on eutrophication. HELCOM is currently working on updating and further developing a set of core indicators of the eutrophication status (2010- 13). The implementation plan of the HELCOM TARGREV project is to review and revise the ecological targets for eutrophication of the BSAP during the 2010-11 period. In March 2011, during the High Level Segment of the 32nd meeting of the Helsinki Commission, the Ministers of Environment from the countries of the Region published the Communiqué on the implementation of the BSAP (based on conclusions from national implementation programmes). It should be mentioned that significant complementary work on implementing actions to reduce nutrients in Russia and Belarus is being carried out under the Northern

Dimension Environmental Partnership. 9

  “Promote measures and practices which reduce nutrient losses from farming and address eutrophication”. The aim is to ensure high environmental standards with particular focus on reducing nutrient leakage. To achieve this, in addition to the full implementation of the Nitrates and Water Framework Directives, and the new Common Agricultural Policy Cross-Compliance requirement to establish buffer strips along water courses no later than 1 January 2012, additional rural development measures could be used, for example, to maximise fertiliser efficiency or achieve nutrient recycling. To support this process, it is important to identify all the intensively used agricultural land of the whole catchment area and to focus on these areas first. Should this prove insufficient, consideration could be given to what further measures might be needed through environmental or agricultural policies.

Report: In addition to the implementation of the Nitrates and Water Framework Directives, several major projects contribute to promoting sustainable solutions in agriculture from policy level to farm level. The Baltic COMPASS Project (Comprehensive Policy Actions and Investments in Sustainable Solutions in Agriculture in the Baltic Sea Region) implements large-scale, on-farm pilot investments based on the most feasible and efficient technologies and management measures identified in coordination with the EUSBSR Flagship Projects Baltic Deal and Baltic MANURE. The HELCOM Agricultural/Environmental Forum (AGRI/ENV) was established in 2010 to improve communication and cooperation between the Agriculture and Environment administrations of the HELCOM Contracting States.

In Russia, backed by local authorities, the Russian Ministry of Natural Resources and Ecology, the Finnish Ministries of Environment and of Agriculture and Forestry and NEFCO are preparing joint investments to introduce good manure treatment practices within the framework of the Northern Dimension Environmental Partnership. Also, the HELCOM BALTHAZAR Project (2009-11) in the Leningrad and Kaliningrad Regions aims at implementing on-farm pilot projects to the environmental benefit of the Baltic Sea.

7 Agreed in November 2007 by Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Germany, Denmark, Russia

and the European Commission.

8 Eutrophication in the Baltic Sea – An integrated thematic assessment of the effects of nutrient enrichment of

the Baltic Sea Region. Executive Summary (BSEP No. 115A and 115B) at www.helcom.fi.

10

  “Full implementation of the Water Framework Directive 10 in order to maximize the

environmental benefits for the Baltic Sea”. Member States shall take measures to obtain good ecological status in all water bodies, including coastal waters, by 2015. A full implementation (including reporting) of the Water Framework Directive, together with the Nitrate Directive and the Urban Waste Water Directive, will also improve the environment in the open sea, in line with the objectives of the Marine Strategy Framework

Directive 11 for 2020.

Report: This action should be seen in connection with the objectives of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive and the River Basin Management Plans relevant for the Baltic Sea catchment area.

Cooperative actions:

  “Establish and restore more wetlands” to recycle the nutrients (to stop the nutrients leaking into the sea) and to mitigate floods (to stop the runoff of fertilisers during floods). The wetlands should be established where long-term effects can be expected, considering the different climatic conditions, the sensitivity for eutrophication, etc.

Report: HELCOM's Joint Comprehensive Programme (JCP) includes four transboundary hot spots which address the management of coastal wetlands. HELCOM’s BSAP also takes into account an endorsed list of examples for reducing nutrient inputs, including the establishment of wetlands. The JCP is expected to be finalised in 2012.

  “Set up the BO US 185 (formerly 169) scheme” in order to have a sustainable research framework. This action is underway and expected to be implemented from the end of 2011/early 2012.

Report: BONUS will focus on building strong links across communities and sectors within and among the Baltic Sea countries. These activities will also provide valuable guidance to the development of policy-driven strategic research agendas for the programme. From 2012 onwards, BONUS will open calls for proposals and fund research on topics supporting the work of the Strategy with almost €100 million.

  “Facilitate cross-sectoral, policy-oriented dialogue” on integration of agricultural, environmental and rural development issues by supporting the implementation of projects which build capacity based on an integrated approach to mitigation of nutrient losses and policy level adaptation.

Report: This action concerns providing adequate forums for discussion between environmental, agricultural and rural development national authorities. The participation of

10 Directive 2000/60/EC i of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2000 establishing a

framework for Community action in the field of water policy, OJ L 327, 22/12/2000, p.1) as amended by

European Parliament and Council Decision 2455/2001/EC, OJ L 331, 15/12/2001, p.1.

11 Directive 2008/56/EC i of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 June 2008 establishing a

framework for community action in the field of marine environmental policy (Marine Strategy Framework

Directive), OJ L 164, 25/6/2008, p.19). In addition to the basin scale assessment required in the context of the

Marine Strategy Framework Directive, the satellite remote sensing products (such as those developed specifically for the Baltic Sea by the Commission's Joint Research Centre [JRC] Institute for Environment and

Sustainability [IES]) provide a useful means of verifying the environmental benefits of implementation of the

EU policies.

HELCOM in the Baltic COMPASS Project and the establishment of the AGRI/ENV Forum are facilitating this developing dialogue.

Flagship Projects (as examples):

  1.1. “Remove phosphates in detergents in countries where this is not yet the case as recommended by the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan, i.e. to prepare a timetable for phasing out the use of phosphates in detergents". Without prejudice to the ongoing process within the Commission for possible action at EU level, a timetable should be prepared for the early phasing-out of phosphates in detergents in the Baltic Sea Region. (Lead: Sweden; Deadline: 31 December 2012). FAST TRACK

Report: The aim of the project is to support Baltic Sea Region countries in implementing HELCOM Recommendation 28E/7, e.g. national legislative action to limit the use of phosphates in laundry detergents and automatic dishwasher detergents. This is being accomplished by producing information material for policy-makers. So far, an information leaflet has been produced to provide decision-makers with some answers to frequently asked questions that highlight the possibilities and proportionality of implementing the HELCOM Recommendations. The information leaflet has been made available in both English and Russian (see http://www.kemi.se – choose ‘publications’ then ‘brochures and leaflets’). The English version of the document has been published on various websites, such as those of HELCOM, Priority Area 1 and the Swedish Chemicals Agency. The Russian version will also be published on various websites and distributed to decision-makers around the Baltic Sea. Additional material may be produced upon request from the different MS.

On 4 November 2010, a draft proposal for a harmonised regulation regarding the use of phosphates and other phosphorous compounds in household laundry detergents was presented by the Commission.

The expected finalisation of the project is June 2011.

  1.2. “Cleaner waste water” by identifying and building/upgrading priority Waste Water Treatment Plants around the Baltic Sea (for example in Neman and Sovetsk), taking into account the HELCOM requirements to remove phosphorous and nitrogen (including reaching 0.5 mgP/l treatment efficiency). In addition, the functioning of existing Waste Water Treatment Plants should be improved, taking into account the ongoing HELCOM process, and its requirements and timetable. (Lead: Sweden; Deadline for progress review: to be determined).

Report: The aim of the project is to identify, build or upgrade prioritised Urban Waste Water Treatment Plants (UWWTP) around the Baltic Sea, taking into account the HELCOM requirements to remove phosphorous and nitrogen. The project is so far in its beginning. The first part aims to:

  • 1. 
    Gather information and make a compilation of ongoing projects regarding cleaner waste water within the Baltic Sea Region.
  • 2. 
    Compile existing statistics and make a list of treatment plants and cities to be prioritised in the work of building/upgrading Waste Water Treatment Plants.
  • 3. 
    Identify different countries' difficulties in carrying out the HELCOM Recommendation.

A project group has been established with participants from the countries around the Baltic Sea and HELCOM. One challenge has been to identify people willing to join the project group. Once this has been done, the next steps include action to include Belarus, Russia and Ukraine in the work and the development of a list of necessary actions to help everyone reach the targets. Since the goals of the project are ambitious (to plan, build and have a treatment plant in place take years), it is not possible at this stage to estimate when the Flagship will be finalised.

  1.3. “Analyse results of pilot actions” funded by the Baltic Sea Region programme (under the European Regional Development Fund), LIFE and Baltic 21 on prevention of eutrophication, and recommend best practices for municipalities, agencies and advisory bodies. (Lead: tbc, DG Regional Policy to follow up; Deadline for progress review: 30 June 2010) FAST TRACK.

Report: The PACs have suggested that this Flagship should be transferred, with the Commission monitoring the transfer. The Commission is currently looking into this.

  1.4. “Baltic Deal – Putting best agricultural practices to work”. The eutrophication status of the Baltic Sea is still unsatisfactory, despite decreased nutrient loads in recent decades. The challenge of stopping farm nutrient run-off and leakage entering the Baltic Sea is recognised by the farming community. The Baltic Deal was initiated by five farmers federations as a voluntary sector response. It is now a funded Flagship Project of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region with seven partners, part-funded by the Baltic Sea Region Programme 2007-13 and the NEFCO/NIB BSAP Trust Fund, respectively. The strategic project objective is to cost-effectively improve the environmental status of the Baltic Sea, without impairing competitiveness or production. The specific project objective is to develop a joint, transnational Baltic Sea Region approach with national adaptation to advance and strengthen agricultural advisory services and related demonstration activities. (Lead: Federation of Swedish Farmers and Latvian Rural Advisory and Training Centre; Deadline: 31 December 2013).

Report: The project "Baltic Deal – Putting best agricultural practices to work" officially started in September 2010 following the successful contract negotiation with the Joint Technical Secretariat of the Baltic Sea Region Programme 2007–13. The Baltic Deal's strategic objective is to further reduce agriculture’s contribution of nutrients to the Baltic Sea without hampering competitiveness or production through a strengthened focus on improved agricultural advisory services and demonstration farms. The project consortium involves seven advisory organisations for farmers and agriculture, and together with around 30 associated partners, it covers all Baltic Sea Region countries, including Norway and Russia. Operationally, the focus is primarily to support the countries in their efforts to further strengthen the agricultural advisory services for the effective transfer of knowledge on practices and measures that ensure smarter use of nutrients and thus contribute to reducing nutrient inputs to the Baltic Sea to acceptable levels.

The project is still in an initial phase, but milestones so far include: i) the conference A greener agriculture for a bluer Baltic Sea in November 2010, organised by the two projects Baltic Compass and Baltic Deal, attended by over 140 professionals from 10 Baltic Sea Region countries, and including the award ceremony for the 2010 WWF Baltic Farmers’ Award; ii) a workshop on “similarities and differences among Baltic Sea Region countries with respect to nutrient management, legislation and agricultural advisory services” in January 2011, which will result in a report on the current state-of-the-art; and iii) a preplanning meeting, also in January, for the pilot project South Baltic Deal – a similar subproject is planned for the B7 Islands, and a dialogue with the relevant B7 bodies has started on this.

  1.5. “Assessment of regional nutrient pollution load and identification of priority projects to reduce nutrient inputs from Belarus to the Baltic Sea”, in particular in the context of the Northern Dimension Environmental Partnership (Lead: Finland; Deadline: 31 December 2011).

Report: The aim of this project is to reduce the nutrient inputs from Belarus to the Baltic Sea in the context of the Northern Dimension Environmental Partnership, with particular consideration given to such key sectors and areas as agriculture, municipal waste water, industry, and the production and use of detergents containing phosphorus. So far, the terms of reference for an assessment and identification study have been developed by the Central Research Institute for Complex Use of Water Resources, the Ministry of the Environment, Finland, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and HELCOM, and agreed with the Belarusian Ministries of Natural Resources and Environmental Protection and the Ministry of Housing and Communal Services. The project now awaits the EBRD's financing decision. It is possible that the political situation in Belarus may affect the launch of the project.

PA 2: To preserve natural zones and biodiversity, including Coordinated fisheries by Germany

Brief summary of overall progress:

Priority Area 2 intends to foster close links between the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region and the political and substantial developments taking place under the HELCOM umbrella with regard to natural zones and biodiversity. As such, HELCOM has an important role as implementing organisation for all the Horizontal Actions and Flagship Projects within this Area. The Priority Area Coordinator organised a late kick-off meeting for the Area in order to be able to take into consideration the outcomes of the HELCOM Moscow Ministerial Meeting in May 2010 – the kick-off meeting was held on 7 October 2010 and brought together Managing Authorities, representatives from Baltic Sea riparian countries and other relevant stakeholders to introduce the Flagship Projects’ Leaders to funding authorities, settle on a common direction and establish links among the various actors.

A number of general activities have been launched by the PAC, including close collaboration with the BONUS Joint Baltic Sea Research and Development Programme. It is expected that the BONUS Strategic Research Agenda 2012-13 will include issues supporting the implementation of the Priority Area, for instance concerning the spatial aspects of biodiversity. The PAC has also established a close exchange with Priority Areas 1 (eutrophication), 4 (clean shipping) and 9 (agriculture, forestry and fisheries) to facilitate knowledge transfers and avoid duplication of work.

Actions:

Strategic actions:

  Implement the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan”. This document contains a specific section on biodiversity and nature conservation, as well as a section and special roadmap on maritime traffic addressing the introduction of alien species via ships’ ballast water and sediments. This is closely related to implementation and development of EU policies, including the Common Fisheries Policy (where the Commission is responsible for taking the necessary policy initiatives).

Report: The HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan is an ambitious programme designed to restore the Baltic marine environment’s good ecological status by 2021. The strategy is a crucial stepping stone for wider and more efficient actions to combat the continuing deterioration of the marine environment resulting from human activities. Much progress has been made. As agreed already by adopting the HELCOM BSAP in November 2007 in Cracow, all countries have now prepared their National Implementation Programmes (NIP) for the BSAP in accordance with their national procedures and needs (information on the Biodiversity segment can be found through this link: http://www.helcom.fi/BSAP/Implementation/en_GB/Implementation/?u4.highlight=NIP ).

Several projects contribute to achieving implementation of the BSAP. The aim of the HELCOM project ‘Red List of Species and Habitats/Biotopes, 2008-12’, for instance, is to prepare a complete HELCOM Red List of biotopes and species under water and swimming on water. With regard to fish and lamprey species, this means updating the existing HELCOM Red List (BSEP 109). The underwater part of the HELCOM Red List of Baltic Sea biotopes and biotope complexes (BSEP 75) will also be updated. The output of the project will also include check-lists of species in the Baltic Sea, and Species Information Sheets. The project aims at delivering these products in time for the 2013 HELCOM Ministerial Meeting. The assessments will be carried out by expert teams, which were set up for each of the species groups and for the biotopes during the 2009–10 period.

The MARMONI Project, which also has a close link to HELCOM work, aims at developing concepts for assessing the conservation status of marine biodiversity, including species and habitats and impacts of various human activities, while the BONUS+ Project BaltGene assesses the genetic diversity situation of several key Baltic Sea species and identifies the most significant pressures.

  “Reduce the negative effects of fishing on the Baltic ecosystem”. In addition to implementing regulations and measures taken at EU level to minimise the impacts of

fishing activities on marine ecosystems, such as the Pingers Regulation 12 and certain

technical measures, Member States can adopt national measures to minimise the effect of fishing on the marine ecosystems within their territorial waters and for fishing vessels flying their flag, that are in line with, or more stringent than, the existing Community legislation. This should be especially stressed for the protection of the critically

endangered Baltic harbour porpoise population.

Report:

The Baltic Fisheries/Environmental Forum responsible for implementing the relevant aspects of the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan Fish/Fisheries met twice in 2010, and has amongst other things worked on a draft project proposal for the development of fisheries measures in Marine Protected Areas in the Baltic Sea, to ensure that the conservation objectives are met. The Forum also followed the implementation of the project aimed at establishing an overview of the state of salmon (Salmo salar) and sea trout (Salmo trutta) populations in rivers flowing to the Baltic Sea (HELCOM SALAR project) and initiated cooperation with the ICES on collecting and assessing background scientific information on the status of eel and flatfish

populations in the Baltic Sea. 13

Over the last year, good cooperation with HELCOM and the ASCOBANS Jastarnia Group, a group of experts from the environment and fisheries sectors of the countries surrounding the Baltic Sea, has been established. This PA 2 network has discussed the progress made as well as further implementation priorities for the Jastarnia Recovery Plan for the Baltic Harbour Porpoise.

Flagship Projects (as examples):

12 Council Regulation (EC) No 812/2004 i adopted in April 2004 laying down measures concerning incidental

catches of cetaceans in fisheries and amending Regulation (EC) No 88/98 i.

16

  2.1. “Create marine protected areas”. The Birds 14 and Habitats Directives 15 (Natura 2000

network), as well as HELCOM, call for Member States to complete the designation of a network of marine protected areas in the Baltic Sea. To be truly efficient, these areas need adopted and implemented management plans that correspond to the threats towards the species or habitat they are created to protect. The designation of the Natura 2000 network in the Baltic Sea should also be taken into account in the context of maritime spatial planning which can contribute to facilitating the coordination of human activities in the marine areas. Coordination is also needed with measures under the Common Fisheries

Policy. (Lead: Germany; Deadline for progress review: to be determined) FAST TRACK.

Report: The development of a comprehensive and coherent network of protected areas has already been successfully advanced. On the occasion of the HELCOM Ministerial Meeting in Moscow in May 2010, a HELCOM report “Towards an ecologically coherent network of well-managed Marine Protected Areas” (MPAs) was presented, to which Germany made a major contribution. According to the report, (as of February 2010) a total of 159 protected areas have been designated in the Baltic Sea by the riparian states. This corresponds to an area of 10.3% of the Baltic Sea. This makes the Baltic Sea the first marine region worldwide to reach the CBD target of designating at least 10% of the marine area as a protected area. More than 35% of the German Baltic Sea area is designated as a marine protected area. One aspect of the Flagship Project has thus already been implemented.

Another encouraging example of rapid development within this field is the project “Implementation of Natura 2000 in Estonian marine areas: site selection, designation and protection measures – ESTMAR” implemented by the Estonian Marine Institute and other Estonian bodies. Moreover, Germany will initiate an INTERREG project proposal ‘MareCap’ that will be submitted for the 4th Call of the Baltic Sea Region Programme. The overall objective of the project will be to contribute to the sustainable use of marine resources by improving the management and surveillance of MPAs, demonstrating the economic potential of implemented management plans and linking the MPA assessment to the new approach of Good Environmental Status according to the MSFD. The MareCap Project should be a demonstration project which will bridge some of the gaps between existing guidelines, operational management and control of MPAs and make substantial progress towards an improved management of Baltic Sea MPAs.

Another project proposal which addresses the aspect of fish migration – and thereby Flagship Project 2.3 – has been initiated, namely ‘Living Baltic Sea – Improving fish migration in the Baltic Region’. It aims at the establishment of measures to facilitate migration and reproduction of migratory fish species. Focusing on the poor condition of particularly migratory fish stocks in the Baltic Sea Region, the project will address the general challenges as well as conduct the main project activities aiming at developing a regional overview of fish populations in the Baltic Sea Region and of the migratory behaviour of specific fish species such as eel.

  2.2. “Restrict the introduction of new alien species by ships” principally through the enforcement of the international Ballast Water Management Convention and by means such as onboard treatment and the installation of ballast water reception facilities in ports with large traffic flows in and out of the Baltic Sea. In the Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP),

14 Council Directive 79/409/EEC i of 2 April 1979 on the conservation of wild birds.

15 Council Directive 92/43/EEC i of 21 May 1992 on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and

flora.

HELCOM countries agreed to ratify the Convention, possibly by 2010, at the latest 2013.

A HELCOM Roadmap has been agreed, focusing on ballast water management for inner

Baltic voyages. Furthermore, HELCOM/OSPAR 16 guidelines on the voluntary interim

application of ballast water exchange standards should be implemented. Actions should build on the new knowledge of the issue arising from ongoing research and also promote further innovative approaches by industry and research institutes. (Lead: HELCOM,

Sweden and Germany; Deadline for progress review: to be determined).

Report: This Flagship Project is subdivided into two segments: a) “technical issues” (lead party Germany under Priority Area 4) and b) a “special” part on alien species (falling under Priority Area 2). The overwhelming share of activities to be carried out is of a technical nature and is more appropriately covered by Priority Area 4.

The BAZOOKA project, which is funded by the Baltic Organisations Network to fund Science EEIG, BONUS and the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, FORMAS, focuses on the restriction of alien species. Although more than 100 invasive species have been recorded in the Baltic, and their impact on the ecosystem is being widely disputed, convincing scientific evidence is scarce. The BAZOOKA project tests the possible cascading effect of alien comb jelly on the plankton food web in the Baltic – predation on cod eggs and larvae, depletion of plankton-eating fish food resources, and changes in water clarity eventually leading to a regime shift of the whole system. By using models, experiments and field studies, the project will quantify the ecosystem consequences of Mnemiopsis (comb jelly) in the pelagic food web, from microbes to gelatinous top predators. Interactions and cascading effects will be quantified within natural spatial (Baltic proper, Bothnian Sea, Bothnian Bay) and environmental (oxygen, temperature, salinity, light, N, P) gradients. The project will monitor Mnemiopsis synchronically with environmental and biological parameters relevant for other trophic levels. State-of-the-art techniques will be applied in field, laboratory and modelling studies.

The altered pelagic community balance in the Baltic may have severe consequences for biodiversity. In 2010 the monitoring of Mnemiopsis was completed with preliminary results showing that currently it is not widely spread in the Baltic. However, this may well change in the future given its living capabilities and growth that now have been substantiated through microcosm experiments. The BAZOOCA project will be running until September 2011. During the last year of implementation the data on the distribution of gelatinous predators will be summarised, the potential effects of water transparency on food competition between fish and jellyfish will be established, and the cascading effect of Mnemiopsis on the lower trophic levels will be assessed. Added together, this information will enable an overview of the negative effect of jellyfish on the Baltic Sea ecosystem.

  2.3. “Establish measures to facilitate migration and reproduction of migratory fish species”, on the basis of a classification and inventory of rivers with historic and existing migratory fish species such as eel and salmon as agreed in the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP). Under the European Fisheries Fund (EFF) Operational Programmes, some EU Member States already contribute to this objective by applying measures aimed at protecting aquatic fauna and flora, in particular the rehabilitation of inland waters, including migration routes. The national eel management plans are also expected to

16 OSPAR is the organisation established by the Convention for the protection of the marine environment of the

North-East Atlantic, to which 15 States and the European Community are Contracting Parties.

contribute to the restocking of this species. (Lead: HELCOM and Germany; Deadline for

progress review: to be determined).

Report: The specific problem to be addressed is the poor condition of migratory fish stocks in the Baltic Sea Region. To do so, the HELCOM SALAR Project was initiated in January 2010 and funded through a co-financing agreement between the European Commission (DG MARE) and HELCOM. The aim of the project is to make an inventory and classification of past and existing Baltic rivers with salmon and/or sea trout populations, and suggest measures for restoration plans and active conservation for selected wild salmon river populations, as suggested in the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP). The project will compile and analyse data on the state of and pressures on salmon and sea trout populations, the quality of river waters and reproduction habitats as well as the possibilities for salmonid passage in rivers. The project will provide a classification of salmon and sea trout rivers based on agreed criteria and the compiled information.

The major outcome of the project will be recommendations and prioritisation of measures in the rivers that are needed for improving the status of salmon and sea trout populations. Other outcomes are a GIS map on Baltic salmon rivers and a database on Baltic salmon and sea trout populations as well as individual descriptions of salmon and sea trout rivers. The project report will identify original salmon and sea trout populations that should be the focus of immediate and effective conservation measures. It will also identify potential populations and rivers for re-establishment and measures for the restoration of river habitats and migratory routes. Furthermore, it will recommend that restoration and development plans be prepared for identified salmon and sea trout populations/rivers in a second phase project. The sea trout populations in the Baltic rivers have as yet not been the subject of a common project.

The SALAR Project is groundbreaking in that it offers a holistic view on the state of salmon and sea trout in the Baltic rivers, and identifies the measures needed for their recovery and development. This will allow for the development of international and national programmes for the funding and systematic realisation of these actions. The Contracting Parties to HELCOM will use the results of the project as a basis when implementing the actions of the HELCOM BSAP concerning salmonids and other actions for the recovery and development of salmon and sea trout populations.

HELCOM has taken note of the outcome of the SALAR Project on Salmon and Sea Trout populations in rivers flowing to the Baltic Sea and approved the draft Final Report. The draft HELCOM Recommendation based on this Report was considered and supported in principle – the aim is to have a final adoption at the HELCOM Heads of Delegations meeting in June 2011.

A new project proposal on developing solutions will be submitted for the 4th Call of the BSR Programme. The main activities planned aim at developing a regional overview of fish populations in the BSR, migratory behaviour of specific fish species such as eel, and the impact of environmental problems in the transition zone between the North Sea and Baltic Sea Regions.

The PREHAB project also contributes to meeting the objectives of this Flagship Project by developing powerful, precise and cost-efficient methods for spatial prediction of the biological properties of coastal underwater habitats, and combines predictive models and scenarios of human pressures to assess effects on coastal biodiversity. A set of models developed by PREHAB in 2010 forms a solid basis for designing recommendations about predictive mapping and subsequent spatial planning in the Baltic Sea. The models cover five case study areas, including some 80 response variables (including fish, macro vegetation, invertebrates, and ecosystem services) and 50 environmental predictors. Finalising the project and the methodology for spatial prediction of bottom habitats will be further refined. The development and testing of a GIS-based tool for assessing ecosystem goods and services, including a WTP-based economic valuation, will be finalised and utilised for case-specific integrated assessments of various planning scenarios.

PA 3: To reduce the use and impact of hazardous substances Coordinated by Sweden

Brief summary of overall progress:

The first main task of the Priority Area Coordinator included the attempt to increase the level of ambition of the two Flagship Projects included under this Priority Area in the original version of the Action Plan. The PAC felt that while one of the two existing projects was too broad, covering virtually the same ground as the Priority Area itself, more varied foci were needed to make progress. This review process has resulted in a total of eight Flagship Projects being included under PA 3 in the December 2010 version of the Action Plan. The HELCOM Secretariat provided significant support throughout the process, and several of the new projects will also be HELCOM projects.

The PAC has established a steering group for the area, and all countries including Russia and a HELCOM representative have assigned a contact person. All countries except Russia and Denmark have participated in one of the two steering group meetings held so far. The main task of the group is to support the overall development of the Priority Area, for instance by ensuring the participation of all relevant national stakeholders.

The PAC points out that an important next step for the area includes promoting cross-cutting links among Priority Areas. This is of great importance to Priority Area 3, as the best way to reduce the use and impact of hazardous substances, financially as well as environmentally, is by not using them in products or in industrial processes – i.e. to not choose hazardous substances already at the design stage. Collaboration with Priority Areas 7 (research and innovation), 8 (Small Business Act) and 12 (education) is seen as particularly relevant for Priority Area 3. Initial contact has been made.

Financing for three of the eight Flagship Projects remains a concern due to the lack of new calls from larger funding organisations.

The PAC highlights in the implementation report that an important added value of the Strategy, mentioned by scientists working within the field, is that it provides long-term agreement on priorities. This opens up possibilities for a more strategic development of research, where projects after their finalisation evolve into new projects within prioritised areas, and where existing networks are more easily maintained. This added value of the Strategy is for instance demonstrated by FPs 3.5 and 3.6.

A website has been created: http://www.naturvardsverket.se/EUSBSR .

Actions:

The actions stated under Priority Area 3 have so far been carried out through the Flagship Projects (see below), and therefore not reported on separately. Given that the Flagship Projects of this Priority Area at the start of the Strategy were considered less developed compared to other Priority Areas, the PAC’s focus in the first year has been on identifying relevant Flagships and getting them running.

Strategic actions:

  “Implement actions to reduce hazardous substances”, including the full implementation of the key directives and regulations relating to chemicals (in particular in the aquatic

environment) 17 . Several actions are contained in the ‘Baltic Sea Action Plan’ (BSAP) of

HELCOM (which contains a specific section on hazardous substances). In addition,

actions already decided internationally also need to be implemented 18 . Supervision is

important, for example supervision of compliance with Regulation (EC) 782/2003 i which transposes the Antifouling Convention of the International Maritime Organization (IMO)

into Community law.

Cooperative actions:

  “Restrict the input of hormone-like substances”, further to an analysis of the sources, flows and impacts of pharmaceutical products in the marine environment.

  “Assess the need to clean up contaminated wrecks and chemical weapons”, where it is required to protect sensitive marine ecosystems, taking into account earlier work carried out by HELCOM.

   “Continue the research on hazardous substances” of specific concern to the Baltic Sea, as this is an area where there is a need to further improve the knowledge basis (e.g. on their interaction and cumulative effects), including through the development of the

BONUS Joint Baltic Sea Research and Development Programme 19 .

Flagship Projects (as examples):

  3.1. "Develop tools and indicators for the assessment of biological effects of anthropogenic chemical stress in the Baltic Sea by investigating the causality between chemical pressure and biological effects at different levels of biological organisation. One outcome of the project will be recommendations for monitoring the effects of hazardous substances in the whole Baltic Sea Region. The project will also contribute to capacitybuilding and network-strengthening via workshops (BEAST project financed by the BONUS Joint Baltic Sea Research and Development Programme). (Lead: Finnish Environment Institute. Deadline for finalisation: 31 December 2011).

17 In particular, but not exclusively, Regulation EC No 1907/2006 i of the European Parliament and of the Council

of 18 December 2006 concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemical substances (REACH) – and Directive 2008/105/EC i of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16

December 2008 on environmental quality standards in the field of water policy.

18 Including the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants and the Convention on Long-range

Transboundary Air Pollution.

19 Decision No 862/2010/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council on the participation of the Union in

a Joint Baltic Sea Research and Development Programme (BONUS) published in the Official Journal on

30.9.2010 (OJ L 256).

Report: The pan-Baltic Sea BEAST project is targeted at developing integrated measures for chemical pollution and tools needed to detect and assess anthropogenic pressure on the Baltic Sea marine ecosystem. The project tests and validates integrated monitoring and assessment approaches for their applicability in the Baltic Sea, carefully taking into account its specific abiotic and biotic characteristics. Using sub-regional assessments, the aim is to provide scientifically-based recommendations for the implementation of an integrated strategy for monitoring chemical-biological effects, and to test and develop approaches to assess Ecosystem Health. To establish links between responses related to chemical pollution within the individuals and effects observed at higher biological levels, an integrated “multi-level toolbox” will be generated, including notably biomarkers as sensitive diagnostic tools. Capacity-building, networking, exchange and intercalibration of methodologies, and training, are other integral parts of the project.

Over the past two years, all major field sampling campaigns have been executed. A project website ( www.environment.fi/syke/beast ) has been established and is planned to be improved in 2011. A joint BEAST/BALCOFISH project database (BonusHAZ) has been established and is currently being used for compilation of data from both these BONUS+ projects and other relevant sources. The project and its preliminary results have been presented at a large number of international and national scientific and stakeholder events as well as expert groups of international organisations such as ICES and HELCOM.

The BEAST Steering Group has decided to apply for further funding for the continuation of the BEAST network and research activities, with an increased number of scientific partners/network companions and updated targets and work plan.

  3.2. “Assess the need to clean up chemical weapons”, where required to protect sensitive marine ecosystems, including through exchange of experiences (taking into account the work carried out within HELCOM). Activities should encompass identification of the current priority threats and establishment of the costs and benefits of any possible action

through agreed research programmes. This should build on existing knowledge 20 and

mapping in the Baltic Sea. The development of major offshore infrastructure projects should also take into account the location of underwater chemical weapon dumping sites (Lead: Chief Inspectorate of Environmental Protection, Poland, with the involvement of all nine Contracting HELCOM Partners; Deadline for finalisation: to be determined)

FAST TRACK.

Report: The overall aim of the project is to update existing information on chemical weapons dumped in the Baltic Sea and to develop additional recommendations on how to further proceed with chemical weapons. To avoid duplication of work, the project will be carried out through the work of the HELCOM ad hoc Expert Group on dumped chemical munitions (“HELCOM MUNI”). During the first meeting of the group in November 2010, the HELCOM Contracting Parties agreed to submit national reports to the HELCOM Secretariat by 1 April 2011. The group works in cooperation with International Dialogue on Underwater Munitions (IDUM) through knowledge exchange as well as with the project “Modelling of ecological risks related to sea-dumped chemical weapons” (MERCW). Following a request from the Flagship Project leader, the PAC has issued a Letter of Commitment for the project CHEMSEA (Chemical Munitions Search and Assess) led by the Institute of Oceanology of

20 E.g. the research programme "Modelling of ecological risks related to sea-dumped chemical weapons”

(MERCW), http://www.fimr.fi/en/tutkimus/muu_tutkimus/en_GB/mercw/ and the work in HELCOM http://www.helcom.fi/environment2/hazsubs/en_GB/chemu/?u4.highlight=ammunition

the Polish Academy of Sciences, in order to send in an application under the 4th Call of the Baltic Sea Region Programme 2007-13. The project would be included in the scope of the Flagship Project objectives.

One challenge encountered by this project relates to involving all BSR countries in the work of HELCOM MUNI. During the first meeting of the group, representatives from Estonia, Finland and the Russian Federation were absent. At various HELCOM meetings, the Polish Head of Delegation will systematically call on all Baltic States to participate in HELCOM MUNI.

The following steps will involve the submission of national reports on the set of tasks for HELCOM MUNI, concerning for instance the revision and updating of the existing information on dumped chemical munitions; and the development of relevant recommendations/checking whether or not the Recommendations from HELCOM’s “CHEMU report” are followed satisfactorily. An estimate of the costs involved in cleaning up chemical weapons, as well as of the expected date of finalisation, will be possible after the submission of the national reports.

  3.3 "Sustainable management of contaminated sediments". A guideline and tool-box for treatment technologies and an assessment and decision support system will be developed, while field tests to validate and demonstrate treatment methods under various conditions will also be conducted. A long-term network will be created through interaction with key target groups and a participatory approach to all work packages (SMOCS project financed by the Baltic Sea Region Programme). (Lead: Swedish Geotechnical Institute; Deadline for finalisation: 16 December 2012)

Report: The project addresses the problem of sustainable management of contaminated sediments. The aim is to provide support for dredging actions all around the Baltic Sea Region. The objective will be reached through the development of a guideline for the management of contaminated sediments, including sustainability assessment practices and decision support tools regarding handling alternatives, including disposal both at sea and on land, and also beneficial use of treated dredged masses as well as treatment technologies, including field tests. A long-term network will be created through interaction with key target groups and a participatory approach to all work packages.

During the first year of the project, a website was for instance created, www.smocs.eu , and a site demonstration of a treatment technology in a port carried out. During 2011 and 2012, activities planned include the development of assessment and decision support tools, field tests and workshops.

  3.4 “Development of HELCOM Core Set Indicators (HELCOM CORESET) for hazardous substances and biodiversity to support regular updating of the thematic assessments, which assess whether HELCOM’s strategic goals and ecological objectives have been reached, and whether the implementation of the Baltic Sea Action Plan has been successful. The indicators should be fully in line with Good Ecological Status (GES) as defined in the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive, and the ensuing guidelines or criteria. The project will ensure the necessary cooperation and coordination, and finally also the region-wide marine harmonisation needed to set specific Baltic Sea targets for GES related to hazardous substances and biodiversity. (Lead: HELCOM secretariat; Deadline for finalisation: 30 June 2013).

Report: The project will develop a set of core indicators to follow up the effectiveness of the implementation of HELCOM's Baltic Sea Action Plan. The core indicators will also support the EU Member States in the Baltic Sea Region in implementing the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive. The work will particularly focus on core indicators for the status of the Baltic Sea in relation to hazardous substances and biodiversity. The Flagship status of the project only applies to the expert work on hazardous substances, and not that on biodiversity.

The Expert Group for Hazardous Substances proposed in its last meeting (2–3 February 2011) a set of core indicators for hazardous substances and their biological effects. The core set currently includes 14 core indicators and 15 candidate core indicators. The next meeting,

31 May–1 June, will propose the final set of core indicators. The meeting also agreed that the

core indicators would be assessed on a common template, to be presented on the HELCOM website, and updated annually or biannually.

The core indicators for hazardous substances require quantitative targets, which reflect the good environmental status. The CORESET Expert Group has elaborated on the target setting and used available environmental quality standards. All the proposed core indicators now have a quantitative target. Some of the candidate core indicators have inadequate support from the existing monitoring programmes, but the project will feed that information to the ongoing review of the HELCOM monitoring programmes.

The CORESET project will submit a proposal for the core indicators for hazardous substances and their effects to the project Advisory Board in September 2011 after which they will be presented at the meeting of the HELCOM Monitoring and Assessment group (MONAS) in October. Finally, the core indicators will be submitted for national processes in October 2011, for additional use in implementing the Marine Strategy Framework Directive.

  3.5 “Control of Hazardous Substances in the Baltic Sea Region by identifying the sources and inputs of 11 hazardous substances and substance groups which are addressed in the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan, and developing measures to reduce the load of these substances. The project also aims at improving knowledge of best practices and capacity-building (COHIBA – project co-financed by the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme 2007-13). (Lead: Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE). Deadline for finalisation: 2012)

Report: The main objectives of COHIBA are the following:

  • Identification of sources of selected hazardous substances in countries around the Baltic Sea
  • Development of innovative toxicity-based cost-effective monitoring
  • Analysis of substance-specific flow patterns into the Baltic Sea
  • Development of recommendations for management measures (including technical and non technical measures) to reduce emissions of hazardous substances into the Baltic Sea
  • Knowledge transfer of best practices and capacity-building

The hazardous substances segment of the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan addresses 11 hazardous substances and substance groups, which are also target substances of the project.

The project has compiled initial summaries of sources and pathways of selected hazardous substances based on national surveys in Baltic Sea EU countries. Results of a wide toxicity testing programme have been developed into a proposal on how a whole effluent assessment could be adopted in the Baltic Sea Region. An inventory of methods to reduce emissions using both technical and non-technical measures was carried out as a basis for evaluating methods and their cost-efficiency. Information exchange, especially in the eastern part of the Baltic Sea area, has started to efficiently utilise project results in a discussion with stakeholders.

In 2011, the project will concentrate on further development of the analysis of sources, flows and inputs in the Baltic Sea and on management methods for reducing emissions. Guidance documents on the selected substance groups and recommendations on measures to reduce the emissions of these substances will be provided. A final COHIBA seminar will give a forum for discussions on 11-12 October 2011 in Helsinki, Finland. Project reports will be finalised by early 2012. Possible funding sources for additional work after early 2012 will be investigated.

  3.6 “Innovative Management of Hazardous Substances in the Baltic Sea Region, (InnoMaHaz) transfers the knowledge from COHIBA about mapping sources and evaluating the cost-efficiency of measures to a set of emerging hazardous substances, e.g. pharmaceuticals. In addition to the established measures evaluated in COHIBA, innovative measures will be analysed in terms of cost-efficiency and ease of implementation. This analysis will target selected fields, which have been identified in COHIBA as potential gaps, e.g. import of products (such as textiles), flame retardant use in the building sector or new urban infrastructure concepts for waste, waste water and urban run-off. Relevant stakeholders will be involved in the project, e.g. SMEs in the Baltic Sea states. With these activities, InnoMaHaz contributes to an innovation network for management of hazardous substances in the Baltic Sea Region. (Lead: Germany (Fraunhofer); Deadline for finalisation: to be determined)

Report: There is heavy pressure to find ways to manage hazardous substances sustainably in the Baltic Sea Region, as demanded by the BSAP and the EU's marine strategy. This requires coordinated efforts by all countries in the BSR. The Flagship proposal InnoMaHaz is supported by a network of experts from all countries bordering the Baltic Sea, including Russia and Belarus. The aim of the project is to identify a number of relevant hazardous substances not yet targeted by the BSAP (e.g. pharmaceuticals), and to investigate the sources and emissions of these substances in the BSR in regionalised SFAs. This will be supported by a screening study on relevant sources tailor-made for each substance. Based on this work, measures to cost-effectively and sustainably reduce the emission of hazardous substances will be evaluated, again with a strong regional aspect taking into account the different socioeconomic boundary conditions and the different technological baselines. Measures to be evaluated include, amongst others, innovative measures to target emissions from the urban stock of hazardous substances.

In the future, the lessons learned from tackling the hazardous substances problem in the BSR could help to form a strong regional innovation system regarding hazardous substances management. As hazardous substances are a growing concern in many areas worldwide, there is also an opportunity for the BSR to become a technology leader in a growing global market. This refers not only to technologies but also to know-how of implementation and adaptability of technical and non-technical measures to different boundary conditions.

The project is still in the planning state. The aim is to submit a proposal early 2012.

  3.7 "Reduce the use of the Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC) in the Baltic Sea Region". The project aims at bringing forward substances relevant for the environment in the Baltic Sea, such as the Recommendations on hazardous substances made through the Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP) to the REACH candidate list. One central part of REACH is the “candidate list” of SVHC, listing chemicals whose use will most likely be severely restricted in the future. The SIN-List is a database with 356 chemicals and chemical groups that fulfil the REACH criteria for SVHC. (Lead: The International Chemical Secretariat. Deadline for progress review: tbd)

Report: The project aims at reducing the use of hazardous chemicals in the Baltic Sea Region, by including substances such as those mentioned in the Recommendations on hazardous substances made through the Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP) to the REACH candidate list. REACH, with its provisions to restrict chemicals, provides a powerful tool for strengthening the ongoing HELCOM work on one of its main objectives – protecting the Baltic Sea from hazardous substances, including endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs).

The project is in a start-up phase and funds have been applied for by the leading coordinator of the project (ChemSec) from the Swedish EPA to initialise the cooperation required among the planned participants in the Baltic region (Sweden, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Finland).This start-up project will also explore the possibilities of cooperation across different Priority Areas as well as funding for the Flagship Project. Once start-up financing has been secured, it is expected to have a final application ready and financed for a possible start of the project in early 2012.

  3.8 “Make the Baltic Sea Region a leader in sustainable development for pharmaceuticals by establishing a network on pharmaceuticals with a focus on sustainable development where good practice and experience are exchanged between people with knowledge of medical products and health and environmental aspects within the Region. Focal points should be established in all Baltic Sea Region Member States in order to increase knowledge and to make a platform for further discussions on working towards the goal of sustainable development. (Lead: Swedish Medical Products Agency. Deadline for progress review: tbd)

Report: Environmental problems are linked to both the use and manufacture of pharmaceuticals. The aim of the project is to increase knowledge among states in the Baltic Sea Region on good practices for using and handling medicinal products, including antibioticresistant strains. A network will be established with a focus on sustainable development where good practices and experiences are exchanged between people with knowledge of medicinal products and health and environment aspects within the Region. The establishment of focal points in all countries of the Baltic Sea Region is also envisaged.

The project will start by identifying work already ongoing and relevant agreements, within the EC Communication (December 2008), EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive, HELCOM Moscow Ministerial Meeting (June 2010), and other relevant EU legislation for approval of pharmaceuticals (September 2010). The project partners have now been identified, and the project is expected to start in autumn 2011 and run for three years. There are similar goals within HELCOM – Moscow Ministerial Declaration May 2010 – and the Baltic Sea Action Plan and it is believed that joint work will benefit outcomes and resources. In order to facilitate the participation of Russia in the Priority Area, a presentation of the project was to be given at the XII International Environmental Forum Baltic Sea Day in St Petersburg 21-23 March. During this forum, bilateral contacts would also be made.

PA 4: To become a model region for clean shipping Coordinated by Denmark

Brief summary of overall progress:

The main goal of this Priority Area is to reduce emissions from shipping into both the air and the sea. The Priority Area Coordinator reports that overall progress is good. The Strategy is believed to have improved access to funding for good, relevant projects (for instance, two sub-projects under Flagship Project 4.2, BSR InnoShip and CleanShip, and Flagship Project 4.6. on LNG shipping, recently obtained co-funding from, respectively, the BSR Programme and the 2010 TEN-T call for Motorways of the Sea), and strengthened the possibility for creating inclusive and comprehensive macro-regional networks (including Russia).

In addition, the PAC finds that the Strategy has succeeded in giving the implementation of the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan renewed energy and visibility. HELCOM is currently preparing a submission to the Marine Environment Protection Committee of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to make the Baltic Sea an Emission Control Area with regard to NOx emissions under MARPOL Annex VI. This will mean an 80% reduction in NOx emissions from new ships built from 2016 onwards. Also, basic policy decisions about the designation of the Baltic Sea as a Special Area for the discharge of sewage from passenger ships are moving forward. Several Flagship Projects under the Priority Area are involved in facilitating solutions to meet the strict SOx emission regulation that will enter into force in 2015.

The PAC points to a need to keep up pressure when it comes to securing political prioritisation of the Strategy. The first experience with the implementation process has demonstrated that a shortage of allocated human resources within the national administrations has had an impact on what could be achieved. Genuine political backing of the implementation process is seen as a prerequisite for success.

A Priority Area website has been put in place: http://www.sofartsstyrelsen.dk/skibsfartspolitik/Sider/EUStrategyfortheBalticSeaRegion.aspx . The PAC points out that an important challenge in the medium-term will be to identify new relevant follow-up projects, as some of the current Flagship Projects will soon terminate. This task will partly depend on the prioritisation of the Strategy within the national administrations.

Actions:

Strategic actions:

  Implement actions to reduce ship pollution” (in the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the EU and HELCOM). The Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP) of HELCOM contains a specific section on maritime activities, such as technologies to reduce pollution in harbours. At international level, the MARPOL (Annex VI) introduces even stricter conditions for SOx in the Baltic Sea (the sulphur content of any fuel oil used on board ships within the Baltic Sea, which is a SOx Emission Control Area, currently set at the level of 1.50% m/m, shall not exceed 1.00% m/m from 1 July 2010, and 0.10% m/m from 1 January 2015). Hence, SOx emissions will be reduced substantially by 2015. As to NOx emissions, the MARPOL (Annex IV) provides for establishing marine areas as NOx emission control areas. New rules would require that ships built in and after 2016 reduce emissions by around 80%. In this context, the possibility to establish the Baltic Sea as a NOx Emission Control Area should be addressed. While taking into account that the international shipping regulations must be adopted if possible within the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the EU will continue to assess, depending on progress of negotiations on several key issues, whether action is required at EU level or specifically within the Baltic Sea Region.

Report: Annex VI to the MARPOL Convention is the global instrument regulating emissions from merchant ships. A major revision of Annex VI was adopted in 2008 and entered into force on 1 July 2010. The revision will result in cuts in emissions of NOx and SOx. In particular, emissions of SOx in marine regions designated as a SOx Emission Control Area (ECA) – like the Baltic Sea – will be reduced significantly and will result in an improvement of air quality and reduced health risks in coastal areas within the next couple of years. A cut in NOx emissions from ships in the Baltic Sea required by the revised Annex VI will, however, be much less significant. This will not be sufficient to counterbalance the increasing emissions related to the predicted growth in maritime transportation unless the Baltic Sea is designated a NOx Emission Control Area (ECA). The work on this ECA in the HELCOM Correspondence Group (CG) on ECA, led by Finland, has been carried out since 2008, and has included extensive studies on the effect of shipping emissions on eutrophication and its harmful effects on human health, as well as studies on the economic impacts of this measure. All Baltic Sea countries agreed that the Baltic Sea should be designated an ECA, and the HELCOM meeting in March 2011 set up the next steps needed for a successful submission of the proposal to the IMO.

The ECA requirements concern only new ships built in or after 2016. It will take the next 30- 40 years for all ships to be covered by more stringent NOx emission regulations. Some complementary, voluntary actions are needed to cut NOx emissions from ships in the Baltic Sea. Also, it is important that the North Sea area be designated an ECA concerning NOx emissions. The joint application will be further scrutinised with the aim of listing any possible aspects that might be missing in the documentation, with a progress report to be considered in June 2011, and also with the aim of discussing and further concluding on the documentation at the 10th Meeting of the HELCOM Maritime Group in the autumn of 2011. The Baltic Sea countries welcome and support the idea of also designating the North Sea an ECA concerning NOx emissions, as it would increase the environmental benefits and cost-efficiency. Further details on the final date of the submission will be available during this year.

Flagship Projects (as examples):

  4.1. “Promote measures to collect ship-generated waste (enhanced application of HELCOM’s ‘no special-fee’ system for port reception facilities especially for oily waste from machinery spaces, sewage and garbage). It is important that the main ports implement a uniform and transparent approach. Furthermore, the availability of port reception facilities in the Baltic Sea ports should be further enhanced to cover the delivery of all waste, especially waste water, taking into account the proposal by the HELCOM Member States to the International Maritime Organization (IMO), asking for a prohibition of the discharge of sewage from ships, especially from passenger ships and ferries. (Lead: HELCOM; Deadline for progress review: to be determined) FAST TRACK

Report: The project aims at an enhanced application of HELCOM's "no special-fee" system for port reception facilities (PRF) as well as the availability of PRF in Baltic Sea ports, especially for waste water. The Baltic Sea countries have successfully undertaken the initiative within the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to develop new regulations for discharges of sewage from passenger ships operating in the Baltic Sea (see Flagship Project 4.4, “Eliminate the discharge of sewage from ships”). In July 2010, the IMO approved the proposed amendments to the international MARPOL Convention (Annex VI), including the designation of the Baltic Sea as a Special Area for Sewage. Final adoption will take place in July 2011. For passenger ships operating in the Baltic Sea Special Area, it will be prohibited to discharge untreated sewage into the sea; instead they will be required either to treat the sewage on board or remove any nutrients prior to discharge or to deliver it to a PRF.

The precondition for the Baltic Sea Special Area entering into effect is the availability of adequate PRFs for sewage. PRFs in cruise ports are especially important, as cruise liners produce the largest amounts of sewage. The priority passenger ports that need to upgrade their PRFs for sewage have been identified and agreed between the Baltic Sea countries. At the end of 2010, HELCOM established a Cooperation Platform on PRFs in the Baltic Sea to promote dialogue on the provision of adequate PRF for sewage among the key stakeholders. They include port organisations, the shipping industry, especially cruise liners, the maritime administrations of the coastal countries as well as water and waste water utilities. The Platform's specific tasks, such as identification of gaps, building a common understanding on technical and operational aspects of sewage delivery, and following developments of the technology for onboard sewage treatment, are led by the appointed stakeholders: Poland, the Baltic Ports Organisation, Sweden, the WWF and Germany.

A local stakeholder meeting on upgrading PRFs was organised by the lead country Poland and hosted by the Port of Gdynia in March 2011 with the aim of presenting the ongoing and planned activities on PRFs and discussing possible financial sources, including a presentation of the NIB/NEFCO BSAP Technical Assistance Fund.

For the years to come, the PACs recommend that investments in PRF for sewage should be prioritised and well-reflected within different national and European financing programmes. On a practical level, a website will be created on the HELCOM webpage where members of the Cooperation Platform will be able to exchange views and information. The progress in the work of the Cooperation Platform will be reviewed during the annual HELCOM Maritime Meeting in the autumn of 2011. The Baltic Sea countries have agreed to upgrade PRFs for sewage in the priority passenger ports as soon as possible, preferably by 2013, but by 2015 at the latest. Thus, 2015 is the expected date for notifying the IMO on the availability of adequate PRF in the Baltic Sea and for the Baltic Sea Special Area taking effect.

  4.2. “Promote measures to reduce emissions from ships and enhance the development for shore side electricity facilities or for emission treatment in all major ports around the Baltic Sea". Their use should be promoted including through economic incentives in order to come to a level playing field. (Lead: Finland and Sweden; Deadline for progress review: to be determined by the lead Member State) FAST TRACK

Report: The overall aim is to reduce the adverse effects of pollution from maritime traffic on the sea as well as in ports and cities, while at the same time optimising the competitiveness of shipping in the area. Several intermediate goals set by the two sub-projects, BSR InnoShip and CleanShip, which both received financing from the BSR Programme in 2010, will contribute to this aim. The BSR InnoShip project focuses on identifying and promoting technological, economic, regulatory and systemic innovations to reduce the emissions. The CleanShip project focuses on measures reducing emissions in ports, including those from ships.

The CleanShip project will address emissions from ships at the policy, strategic and technical level. The aim is to elaborate a clean shipping strategy and to harmonise and standardise environmentally related infrastructure such as shore side electricity, supply of LNG and natural gas and PRF for waste water from ships. The project also aims at developing a joint strategy on differentiated port dues and other economic instruments. The BSR InnoShip project will address the Baltic Sea countries and the key marine stakeholders to cooperate in minimising ship-based air pollution, while aiming at optimising the competitiveness of the marine industry. The project will promote a new and innovative transnational approach to mitigate the different needs and interests of the maritime sector and to ensure a basis for a more sustainable and economically viable management of the Baltic Sea resources.

Both sub-projects held kick-off meetings and conferences in 2010. Additionally, a coordination meeting was held between the BSR InnoShip and CleanShip projects to coordinate the actions of the sub-projects. The PAC points out that the two sub-projects complement each other and, in some activities, the dividing line seems to be unclear. It is still a challenge to coordinate the activities and to guarantee that duplication of work is avoided. However, the leaders of the sub-projects and the Flagship regularly communicate and meet to keep each other informed and updated, to find synergies and to prepare joint activities.

  4.3. “Introduce differentiated port dues depending on the environmental impact of ships” in the main ports of the Baltic Sea in order to set incentives for ships producing low emissions, managing waste water and ballast water in a sustainable way, using environmentally friendly technologies (especially propulsion systems with, for example, improved energy efficiency), having high safety standards, etc. (Lead: HELCOM; Deadline for progress review: to be determined) FAST TRACK

Report: The aim is to set up economic incentives for ships to produce low emissions, managing waste water and ballast water in a sustainable way, using environmentally friendly technologies, etc. HELCOM Recommendation 28E/13 encourages the application of economic incentives and gives examples of rebate schemes for reducing emissions. Among the Baltic Sea countries, only Sweden has applied differentiated fairway dues to reduce emissions from ships. Finland (the Government of Åland) organised, in collaboration with HELCOM and funded by the Nordic Council of Ministries, a seminar on economic incentives for reduction of nitrogen emissions from ships in the Baltic Sea (Mariehamn, 13 October 2009).

One challenge today is that there are different – and very often complex – port/fairway dues systems in the Baltic Sea countries. The economic incentives have the potential to bring about the greatest results when implemented in a larger geographical area, rather than limited to a specific port or a country. There is also the issue of the competitiveness of ports. Agreeing on the application of a similar scheme in the entire Baltic Sea area has proven difficult. There are other means of encouraging emission reductions, such as awards (for instance, the Baltic Sea wide Clean Baltic Shipping and Sustainable Port Operations Award will be developed within the InnoShip project based on the German environmentally friendly shipping award Blue Angel), ship-specific environmental indices (e.g. Clean Shipping Index in Sweden), voluntary agreements with ship owners, and promotion of the use of LNG. The Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) currently under development in the IMO could serve as a tool to implement and measure emission reductions.

  4.4. “Eliminate the discharge of sewage from ships”, especially from passenger ships, by following up on the proposal by HELCOM to the International Maritime Organization to designate the Baltic Sea as a control area for sewage discharges from passenger ships, whereby cruise and passenger ships will be required to treat their sewage to remove nutrients or deliver it to port reception facilities. (Lead: Finland; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: The aim of the project is to designate the Baltic Sea as a control area for sewage discharges from passenger ships, whereby cruise and passenger ships will be required to treat their sewage to remove nutrients or discharge it into port reception facilities (PRF). Partners involved in the implementation: Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, the Russian Federation and Sweden. The proposal to amend MARPOL Annex IV, to include the designation of the Baltic Sea as a special area for discharges of sewage from passenger ships, as proposed by the HELCOM countries, was approved by the International Maritime Organization in the autumn of 2010.

While the global agreement on the new regulations has already been achieved, some details of standards for onboard treatment of sewage are to be discussed on a technical level in the IMO. To facilitate these discussions, a joint submission to the 55th session of the IMO's Design and Equipment Sub-Committee has been developed under the lead of Finland (adopted by HELCOM HOD 34/2010). The new regulations include conditional entry into force of the Baltic Sea Special Area – the Baltic Sea countries have to ensure availability of adequate PRF for sewage in relevant passenger ports and to inform the IMO accordingly. The Cooperation Platform on PRF has been established to facilitate, in cooperation with ports, the industry and WWTPs, the implementation of the HELCOM Roadmap for upgrading PRF for passenger ports in the Baltic Sea (its Terms of Reference were adopted by HELCOM HOD 34/2010).

In March 2011, the IMO sub-committee DE 55 discussed nutrient reduction standards. Decisions with regard to the standards will probably be made at DE 56 and the final approval subsequently made by the MEPC. Also, in July 2011, MEPC 62 was expected to finally adopt the proposed amendments to MARPOL Annex IV. Finally, the new sewage discharge regulations will enter into force when the Baltic Sea States have reported to the IMO that adequate port reception facilities for sewage are in place at their ports.

  4.5. “Improve the waste handling on board and in ports” within the framework of Baltic Master II project through better involvement of different actors, i.e. coastal municipalities and ports together with national authorities, research institutes, universities and pan-Baltic organisations, and finding practical solutions to improve waste handling. (Lead: Blekinge Region; Deadline for finalisation: 24 January 2012)

Report: Within Baltic Master II, “Waste Management in Ports” (WMP) aims at finding practical solutions to improve waste handling and to see what can be done within the existing legal framework in order to better prevent the input of pollution from maritime transport, thereby not addressing the legal framework per se.

A WMP reference group has been established. Currently about 15 ports and other relevant organisations, from most of the BS countries, are involved. During 2010, the Linnaeus University presented a thesis conducted by students from the Kalmar Maritime Academy. The document was a result of the in-depth analysis of available materials and reports and showed detailed solutions for port routines. Analysis on port waste management was further discussed by the WMP reference group. Existing waste handling routines have also been further developed in three Swedish ports.

Sludge trucks have been successfully introduced, to support work on our task. The WMP has also developed a so-called “Oily water carriage” solution for small and medium-sized vessels that allows more ships to deliver their waste at ports.

Final recommendations for improved and harmonised waste management on board and in ports, strictly based on the results achieved so far by the project, will be presented during spring 2011. During autumn 2011, the recommendations will be disseminated and discussed, as a part of the Baltic Master II communication.

  4.6. "Conduct a feasibility study on L G infrastructure for Short Sea Shipping". Short Sea Shipping must be developed as a sustainable transport alternative encompassing intermodal transport as well as transport of bulk cargo. With the coming cuts in the sulphur content allowed in bunker fuel and limitations on emissions of nitrogen oxides, the competitiveness of Short Sea Shipping is put under great stress and new technologies must be considered. Engine manufacturers have started to offer liquefied natural gas (LNG) as an alternative to oil, but this alternative demands an infrastructure of LNG filling stations. A feasibility study shall form the basis for further action in this field (Lead: Danish Maritime Authority and the Nordic Council of Ministers; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: The aim of the project is to develop recommendations on 1) an LNG infrastructure of filling stations for Short Sea Shipping and 2) regulations, classification rules, industry standards, etc. for Northern Europe. Besides the Baltic Sea, the project covers the North Sea and the English Channel. The three sea areas will be covered by the same emission demands on SOx from 1 January 2015 and the shipping traffic between these areas is extensive. Hence, it is reasonable to include all three sea areas in the project. The recommendations of the project aim to be relevant for central stakeholders such as ship owners, ports, LNG providers, industry organisations, countries, the EU, the IMO, etc., and to form the basis of policymaking, regulations, industry standards and cooperation, and commercial decisions.

On 31 August 2010, an application was submitted to the European Commission under the 2010 TEN-T call for Motorways of the Sea. The application consists of the above-mentioned infrastructure part and a full-scale pilot project part with conversion of two cruise ferries under construction from ordinary fuel to LNG. The ferries are going to be deployed in liner services between Hirtshals in the Northern part of Denmark and three Norwegian cities in the South Western part of Norway. The application was approved by the Commission in December 2010. Agreement with the consultant on the infrastructure part was expected in the beginning of May 2011 and the consultancy work was expected to start in mid-May 2011. The work is expected to be finalised by 31 March 2012. The pilot project runs parallel with the infrastructure project, but will run a year longer than the infrastructure project, i.e. until 2013.

PA 5: To mitigate and adapt to climate change Coordinated by Denmark

Brief summary of overall progress:

Except for Flagship Project 5.2 on the EU-Russia Energy Efficiency Initiative, this Priority Area is characterised by Flagship Projects that are all in their beginning stages. Kick-off meetings have been held and some projects are currently preparing applications for funding. The Priority Area Coordinator's main objective for the short-term is therefore to ensure that all the Flagship Projects get properly started. A medium-term objective is to further develop and implement the EU-Russia Initiative during the period 2011-14.

There was an internal change of PAC for this Priority Area in 2010, followed by a change of administrative authority for the Priority Area from the Danish Energy Agency to the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI). The DMI also leads FP 5.4, which gives the PAC the opportunity to follow this project closely. In general, however, the new PAC points out that it has been difficult to obtain information from all the stakeholders involved in the actions and Flagship Projects of this Priority Area.

Actions:

Strategic actions:

  “Establish a regional adaptation strategy at the level of the Baltic Sea Region” which would provide a useful framework for strengthening cooperation and sharing information across the Region. The possibility of establishing such a regional adaptation strategy should be considered and the consistency of any such strategy with actions at EU level further to the White Paper from the European Commission on adaptation needs to be ensured. This issue could be addressed in the Impacts and Adaptation Steering Group proposed in the White Paper. Ensuring complementarities with EU-wide initiatives, a regional strategy could focus on issues of cross-border interest in the Region such as: developing a more robust evidence base for the impacts and consequences of climate change, raising awareness of the need for action, ensuring and measuring progress (using indicators as benchmarks for measuring progress) and recommending early action to ensure that adaptation is integrated in key policy areas – this means reviewing policies in the light of the risks of climate change and considering options for adaptive action.

Report: This action has developed into a Flagship Project, see below.

Cooperative actions:

  “Promote the whole Baltic Sea Region as a green region (on land and in the sea)”. Some Member States in the Baltic Sea Region are already front-runners in sustainable development (for example Stockholm and Hamburg have been awarded the title of ‘European Green Capital’) and there would be benefits from building on this to spread the experience to the entire region. While this initiative will include a number of important issues (including e.g. air, water and waste), an important priority will relate to promoting action in the Region for mitigation and adaptation to climate change.

Report: Information missing (PAC points out that no response was provided from the project manager)

  “Promote efficient heating systems in renovating district heating or combined heat and power facilities; and “promote energy efficient housing” in the residential sector and public buildings (e.g. regional/local action plans addressing these sectors, network to exchange best practices, etc.).

Report: Information missing (PAC points out that no response was provided from the project manager)

Flagship Projects (as examples):

  5.1. “Anticipate regional and local impacts of climate change through research”. Initiatives in this research field should address specific concerns in the Baltic Sea Region, while ensuring close coordination with overall action at EU level. (Lead: Denmark and Sweden; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: No funding for this project has yet been obtained

  5.2. “Implement fully the EU–Russia Energy Efficiency Initiative”, particularly the annual work programmes of the Joint EU–Russia Thematic Group on Energy Efficiency of the EU–Russia Energy Dialogue, to be implemented jointly by the EU and Russian side. (Lead: European Commission, DG ENER; Deadline for progress review: 31 July 2010)

Report: The EU–Russia Energy Efficiency Initiative supports EU–Russia cooperation in the area of sustainable energy, including energy efficiency, primary energy savings, sustainable use of energy, and renewable energy. It will be further developed and implemented in 2011- 14 in the framework of the EU–Russia Energy Dialogue, particularly in the context of the EU–Russia Partnership for Modernisation. The annual work programmes of the Joint EU– Russia Thematic Group on Energy are to be implemented jointly by the EU and Russian side.

In 2010, this Flagship Project played a major role in preparing the input of the EU-Russia Energy Dialogue to the Partnership for Modernisation. In autumn 2010, in the framework of the Partnership for Modernisation, both sides agreed on a detailed working plan notably in the field of energy efficiency, but also on regulatory issues. A particular focus of the EU–Russia Energy Efficiency Thematic Group was given to legislation, best experience exchange on energy efficiency policy and legislation implementation, statistics and tools for monitoring energy efficiency progress, energy efficiency standardisation and labelling, information exchange on science and technology cooperation in the area of sustainable energy, etc.

Three workshops/roundtables to exchange best practices on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Energy Efficiency Indicators and the bilateral cooperation of Russia and the EU and IFIs in the area of energy efficiency and renewable energy were organised in Russia. Moreover, two projects with 100% EU financing on Energy Efficiency investments and on Energy Efficiency indicators were running in 2010. In addition to these two projects, Russian and EU researchers implemented a joint research project on Bioliquids-CHP: Power generation from biomass. Under the Northern Dimension Environmental Partnership, the ongoing project on rehabilitation of district heating in Kaliningrad also supports the investments of the EBRD.

The following developments will support the implementation of the Flagship Project in the short and mid-term: 1) On 27 December 2010, a State Programme of the Russian Federation for Energy Savings and Increased Energy Efficiency for the period to 2020 was approved by the Russian government; 2) On 21 January 2011, an EU grant programme for non-state actors and local authorities for the Baltic Sea Region was launched (€3.5 million); and 3) The Russian Energy Agency was established and became operational in 2010.

Meanwhile, the FPL points to the following issues as having posed a challenge:

  • 1) 
    The progress with implementation of the work programme in areas of renewable energy and efficient use of the associated gas (gas flaring reduction) was limited as a result of the financial crisis and a slow pace of development with the secondary legislation and regulations for supporting the use of renewable energy sources. In the area of efficient use of the associated petrol gas, a draft law is still under discussion in Russia. Solution: Continued dialogue on the legislation and potential of cooperation on renewable energy in the framework of the Energy Dialogue. Information was received from the EBRD and IFC on their policy dialogue with the Russian government on legislation.
  • 2) 
    EU financing for technical cooperation is still very limited, while the technical and administrative capacity in Russia for energy efficiency is very low. The Russian side was informed about the EU thematic programmes for development of education programmes and encouraged via the Russian Energy Agency to develop project proposals under the Baltic Sea non-state actors grant programme.
  • 3) 
    The administrative capacity of the Ministry of Energy in the area of Energy Efficiency was rather weak during the second part of 2010. The Russian Co-Chair of the Thematic Group left the ministry and no replacement was nominated. Solution: Cooperation with the Russian Energy Agency was developed based on practical best experience exchange between the EU and Russia.

As regards the next steps, the FPL points to:

  • The implementation of the Work Programme of the EU–Russia Joint Thematic Group on Energy Efficiency 2011 in order to support the implementation of the Work Plan of the EU– Russia Modernisation Partnership;
  • Follow-up on activities, such as the TAIEX seminar in Moscow on 25 March concerning energy statistics and energy efficiency indicators, and the EU Sustainable Energy Week Conference in Brussels on 12 April 2011: "EU and Russia Modernisation Partnership: Scaling up low-carbon energy investments and technology cooperation".

The Flagship Project expects to conclude its activities in 2014, depending on the success of the EU–Russia Modernisation Partnership.

  5.3. “Create a network of sustainable cities and villages” to exchange knowledge and good practices on environmentally friendly city management practices. In this regard, consideration could be given to wider participation in the existing Covenant of Mayors initiative that gives the lead to Europe’s pioneering cities to mitigate climate change through the implementation of intelligent local sustainable energy policies that create stable local jobs, increase citizens’ quality of life and address crucial social issues. One important component of a strategy for sustainability will be to take measures at municipal level for mitigation of, and adaptation to, climate change. (Lead: Sweden and Germany; Deadline for finalisation: to be determined) FAST TRACK

Report: The project has been interpreted as aiming to support existing city networks as well as new actors (e.g. Baltic Sea cities in Russia) to further develop their capacities and activities in terms of creating sustainable, climate-friendly cities. Special emphasis is given to how the participating cities and networks together with national and regional actors and industry can pursue green growth strategies and integrate climate/sustainable urban development initiatives in a resource-efficient, green-economy framework. The project will support the existing city networks by helping them to share information and cooperate on the climate challenge and use this challenge to further a green economy. Cooperation is also sought with other interlinked BSR projects.

A meeting with city networks and other regional actors was arranged during the Nordic sustainability conference ‘Solutions’ held in Turku, Finland in February, in cooperation with the Union of the Baltic Cities (UBC), to discuss and further develop the project. A refined project plan is currently being developed. The project leaders, together with the UBC, are currently in the process of writing an application for funding for project development and initial project activities.

  5.4. “Establish a regional adaptation strategy at the level of the Baltic Sea Region” which would provide a useful framework for strengthening cooperation and sharing information across the Region. The possibility of establishing such a regional adaptation strategy should be considered, and the consistency of any such strategy with actions at EU level further to the White Paper from the European Commission on adaptation needs to be ensured. This issue could be addressed in the Impacts and Adaptation Steering Group proposed in the White Paper. Ensuring complementarities with EU-wide initiatives, a regional strategy could focus on issues of cross-border interest in the Region such as: developing a more robust evidence base for the impacts and consequences of climate change, raising awareness of the need for action, ensuring and measuring progress (using indicators as benchmarks for measuring progress) and recommending early action to ensure that adaptation is integrated in key policy areas – this means reviewing policies in the light of the risks of climate change and considering options for adaptive action.

Report: Although the likely impact of climate change is difficult to predict with certainty, it is generally accepted that the projected increase in precipitation amounts and temperature will jeopardise the integrity of the ecosystem and increase the risks of natural disasters (e.g., surges, flooding), thereby posing a threat to the countries bordering the Baltic Sea. There are good experiences with climate adaptation in the Region, but these are rather fragmented and mostly on regional/national scales. Baltadapt aims at developing a true basin-wide Baltic Sea Regional Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, and providing a framework to strengthen cooperation, information and knowledge-sharing within the Region. Although Baltadapt can not in itself implement the strategies for adaptation, the project can ensure its preparation and clear the ground for its adoption.

As part of the work plan, the project seeks to achieve the following results:

  • 1) 
    Establish an information database and help in capacity-building by strengthening the knowledge dissemination process between policy-makers and researchers.
  • 2) 
    Establish a transnational adaptation strategy for the Region with a focus on marine and coastal environments.
  • 3) 
    Prepare an action plan to set the ground for implementing the activities dealing with adapting the Baltic Sea to climate change.

The Baltadapt kick-off was organised by the Lead Partner and took place in Roskilde, Denmark on 10-12 January 2011.

Pillar 2: To make the Baltic Sea Region a prosperous place

PA 6: To remove hindrances to the internal market in the Baltic Coordinated

Sea Region including to improve cooperation in the customs and by Estonia

tax area

Brief summary of overall progress:

All projects within Priority Area 6 are aimed at identifying barriers that are hindering the smooth operation of the internal market and finding ways of reducing or abolishing them. So far, all the projects are moving forward, a great number of hindrances have been mapped, and the present phase could be called “finding solutions to the problems”. All project partners have shown a willingness to contribute to a better functioning internal market without barriers. It has also been identified that the best way of raising awareness among citizens and interested entrepreneurs is by creating web pages where all interested actors can find the relevant information on Member States’ requirements related to goods and services in

different sectors.

A conference “Baltic Sea Strategy and the Internal Market” was organised in Tallinn on 16-17 September 2010. Both experts and senior officials from the Commission and Member States met to discuss practical issues, including those related to the digital agenda of the internal market – e-services, e-signatures etc. – and other ways

in which the internal market and cooperation can be improved.

The main results so far include:

• Internal market barriers according to the aims of Flagship Projects are mapped; • Constant exchange of best practices has taken place in the form of different

meetings of project participants;

• Creation of regional websites containing specific information related to the

Goods Package and the Services Directive targeted at any interested parties has started;

• Efforts have been made to intensifying cooperation with Russia to complement

and facilitate the achievements of the goals of the EUSBSR with the aim of trade facilitation and customs modernisation.

Actions:

Strategic actions:

  “Implement the strategy aimed at sustainable improvement and facilitation of border controls of goods” adopted at the meeting of the EU-Russia Sub-Committee on Customs and Cross-border Cooperation on 26 April 2007 and reconfirmed on 19 June 2008.

1.1. Report: It was decided recently to recast EU-Russia customs cooperation in the format of a Strategic Framework based on mutual interest in economic integration, customs modernisation and convergence in line with international standards. A Strategic Framework for EU-Russia Customs Cooperation was endorsed in December 2010.

An appropriate mechanism (early warning system) to prevent disruption of trade and congestion on border crossings is being discussed between the Commission services and Russian customs. Despite its technical success, the pilot project on exchanges of information has not yet resulted in undisrupted movement of trade flows. Strategic Framework will allow to fully use the potential of the pilot project in the context of

cooperation on risk management.

To implement to Framework, experts groups have been set up to explore ways to cooperate on risk management, operators' reliability, exchanges of information and to

identify the areas for convergence of legislation.

The evaluation of the strategy will be indispensable for the further implementation of the priorities under the Framework. It will be based on the evaluation project on functioning of border-crossing points and procedures. Recently Russia agreed to start implementation of the evaluation project in two phases covering six crossing-points

each. The first phase could start possibly in October 2011.

  “Coordinate with actions taken by the CBSS Working Group on Customs Cooperation and Border-Crossing Aspects (WGCB)” in order to improve cooperation among authorities at the border, including harmonisation of working practices, common training and exchanges of information and best practices.

Report:

The work of the CBSS Expert Group on Customs Cooperation and Border Crossing Aspects was discontinued in June 2011, following the decision by the paticipants of the Group stipulated in the Final Report adopted by CSO of the CBSS. Continued cooperation on these issues will continue in other for a, notably in the Eu-Russia Working Group on Customs Border Issues.

Cooperative actions:

  “Open up the public sector to competition”. Increase productivity in traditionally state and municipal services by gradually opening up more to free competition in relevant areas such as waste management, recreational activities, postal services, related logistics and the broader communications sector, supply of local energy, etc. to secure full access to the respective markets in the Baltic Sea Region.

Report: Information missing

  “Remove remaining barriers to the cross-border provision of services” by timely and consistent implementation and application of the Services Directive and other relevant directives, especially those affecting SMEs and those aiming at the liberalisation of service markets (e.g. the Third Postal Directive which sets a deadline for full market opening by 31st December 2010 for the majority of Member States). Besides requiring Member States to take concrete legislative measures, the Directive asks them to put in place a variety of practical measures such as Points of Single Contact for service providers, electronic procedures and administrative cooperation. It also introduces innovative tools, such as the review of national legislation and the process of mutual evaluation. Close cooperation between the bodies responsible in each Member State for implementing the Services Directive has been established over the last two years in the framework of the “Nordic-Baltic cooperation group”. This cooperation could further be enhanced through exchange of good practices, including for the setting up of Points of Single Contact, and also through engaging business associations in the process.

Report: All Flagship Projects of PA 6 are actively dealing with identifying remaining internal market barriers and finding solutions for how to remove them. Therefore all Baltic Sea Region Member States as well as organisations like the Nordic Council of Ministers and the Nordic Innovation Centre are involved in achieving the goals of the Strategy. Special efforts have also been made to intensify the cooperation with Russia on identifying and implementing initiatives of joint interests.

  Make the EU internal market work on the ground for the Baltic Sea Region” through enhanced cooperation between national authorities in managing the Single Market. Improved and increased administrative cooperation between national authorities in the Baltic Sea Region on the implementation of Single Market Directives should be developed with the existing “Nordic-Baltic cooperation group” for the Services Directive as an inspiration. National authorities are also encouraged to cooperate within the Baltic Sea Region regarding provision of training in Single Market law to national civil servants and court officials; and provision of information to citizens and businesses about their rights and opportunities in the Internal Market. Such close cooperation on Single Market issues between the authorities of the Baltic Sea Region should be developed in the context of and in line with the Commission's Recommendation on Partnerships which was to be adopted in June 2009.

Report: Information missing

  “Promote the principles of good governance in the tax area”, namely transparency, exchange of information and fair tax competition, in order to improve international tax cooperation and reinforce efforts to combat cross-border tax fraud and evasion. A first step would be to reach an agreement with Russia on good governance in the tax area. The alignment of taxation policy should also be pursued, including inter alia gradual approximation of excise rates for cigarettes with Russia. This would diminish tax fraud and smuggling of excise goods into the EU, and also contribute to the budget and health objectives, addressing problems which are difficult to fight by means of reinforced border controls only. Additionally this would contribute to trade facilitation in the Region by reducing the need for strict and detailed controls at the border.

Report: The main idea is to reach an agreement with Russia on good governance in the tax area. This can be achieved by negotiations on the political level between

the EU and Russia.

Flagship Projects (as examples):

  6.1. “Remove remaining Single Market barriers” by strengthening practical cooperation between the responsible authorities. The project consists of five areas divided between two leaders: 1. Identification of the internal market barriers to trade between the countries of the Region and taking actions to remove them – country responsible: Poland. The general objective to be achieved under the project should be to collect extensive information on the barriers to the internal market that hinder the free movement of persons, goods, services and capital between the countries of the Region. 2. Cooperation aimed at the implementation of the Commission Recommendation on measures to improve the functioning of the Single Market – measures ensuring better coordination of Single Market issues (Recommendation no. 1) – country responsible: Poland. To establish a cooperation group (modelled on the Nordic-Baltic group or within that forum) which will meet periodically to exchange experience on the implementation of Recommendation no. 1 on measures to improve the functioning of the Single Market on measures ensuring better coordination of Single Market issues. 3. Intensification of cooperation between the SOLVIT Centres of the countries from the Region – country responsible: Poland. To carry out a joint campaign to increase awareness of the existence of SOLVIT among SMEs and to provide them with reliable and objective information on the type of assistance they may obtain at SOLVIT. 4. Exchange of best practices on the practical functioning of Product Contact Points and Points of Single Contact – country responsible: Sweden. The project should aim at providing a platform for exchange of experience regarding establishing, financing and developing the contact points in the Baltic Region. 5. Provide better information to citizens and business about the Goods Package (including mutual recognition principle) and the Services Directive – country responsible: Sweden. This project could take the form of a group sharing best practice information, which should aim at identifying what kind of information efforts have been carried out regarding the content of the new legislation and the role of the new contact points. Furthermore, the project should aim at identifying if and what kind of additional information efforts could be beneficial to the Region. (Lead: Poland and Sweden; Deadline for progress review: first results produced in June 2011) FAST TRACK

Report: Poland’s Chamber of Commerce has developed the idea of creating a regional website containing information on specific legal requirements related to services and goods in selected sectors in the BSR Member States. This can be used by entrepreneurs and for national administrations for identifying best practices and increasing coordination of procedures. A written draft of the proposal, prepared by the Polish Chamber of Commerce has been distributed among Member States participating in the Flagship Project, as well as the Baltic Development Forum and the Nordic Council of Ministers. The Polish Chamber of Commerce will prepare a pilot portal for the project. The portal will enable communication between experts and exchange of information. All participating countries will be asked to appoint experts, who will be given logins to the portal. The domain baltic-strategy.eu has already been reserved.

SOLVIT Centres’ representatives discussed the idea of creating a common regional enewsletter on SOLVIT and other internal market issues.

In March 2011, Poland suggested applying for EU funds from the Baltic Sea Region Programme 2007-13.

  6.2. “Implement European space for maritime transport without barriers in the Baltic Sea Region”. This plan includes several legislative measures, including a proposal aimed at simplifying administrative formalities based on Community regulations and recommendations to Member States for reducing the administrative burdens imposed on shipping companies. This should be done through analysing the present legal and administrative barriers and initiating necessary changes to the regulatory and administrative framework through better regulation strategies, and by developing integrated EU maritime information reporting systems (single window) agreed at EU level. (Lead: Swedish Maritime Agency tbc; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: Information missing

  6.3. “Increase the use of electronic signatures/e-identification” in contact with authorities in the Baltic Sea Region, in line with the November 2008 Action Plan on esignatures

 and e-authentication 21 , which aims to ensure that electronic signature and

authentication applications are interoperable across borders. This would enable costeffective and more expedient conduct in the provision of public services and of administrative and court proceedings, and make it easier for citizens and private enterprises to report digitally to public authorities, which will also support the strategic action "Remove remaining barriers to the cross-border provision of services" (as described on page 27). Such work should have a heavy focus on market access for foreign citizens and enterprises by avoiding the creation of structural barriers due to increasing the security level for interoperable e-signatures to an unnecessary high level. Joint projects should be developed within the field of the information society; these would include electronic voting and other public and private electronic services. (Lead: Estonia; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: Estonia is currently developing a methodology for evaluation and validation of digital signature certificates used by other countries, based on which an appropriate web service will be developed. The project leaders will make the web service available for experts in the other BSR member states to test the new service.

  6.4. “Encourage sharing of competences between accreditation bodies”. Cooperation between accreditation bodies could be a cost-effective way of sharing competence and offering a wide range of accreditation services to companies, without having all the facilities in each Member State. (Lead: Sweden – Swedish Board for Accreditation and Conformity Assessment; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: Discussions between the accreditation bodies on prioritised area for cooperation have started. The work will be divided into four phases: Areas that have been proposed are, for example, accreditation of medical laboratories, assessment/accreditation of notified bodies and greenhouse gas verifiers. It has been decided to choose 3 to 5 subjects among the proposed areas and for discussions to start on each of these. (Phase 1)

43 It was decided to start with two of the proposed areas, accreditation of certification bodies for the scope “greenhouse gases” and accreditation of proficiency testing (PT)-providers. In the area of greenhouse gases, it has been identified that a harmonisation discussion is useful, while for accreditation of PT providers there is a new standard, ISO 17043, which is not yet fully implemented, thus highlighting the need for harmonisation. There have been constructive discussions, and proposals for other activities within the area have been developed. The networks within the greenhouse gases and PT testing are in place. (Phase 2)

The next steps would be to create, within each area, a network with one contact person and to create, within each area, a pool of technical assessors with specific competence. (Phase 3)

Phase 4 will be using and developing the experience from Phases 1 – 3 to expand other areas within the national accreditation work and also to create a pool of experts to support the strengthening of accreditation work in developing countries.

  6.5. “Monitor implementation of the priorities of the EU-Russia strategy” for improvement of customs and border procedures , namely: a) Implementation by Russia of legislative, administrative and procedural measures to improve the situation at the border; b) Implementation of a pilot project on EU-Russia information exchanges; and c) Implementation and development of border-crossing and customs infrastructure. (Lead: European Commission, DG Taxud/EU-Russia Working Group on Customs Border Issues; Deadline for finalisation: to be determined)

Report: It was decided recently to recast EU-Russia customs cooperation in the format of a Strategic Framework based on mutual interest in economic integration, customs modernisation and convergence in line with international standards. The Strategic Framework on EU-Russia customs cooperation was endorsed during the visit of Commissioner Šemeta to Moscow in November 2010.

A number of important legal acts, including on the reduction of agencies operating at the border, were adopted by Russia in late 2010, and their full implementation will contribute to trade facilitation and customs modernisation. In the meantime, an appropriate mechanism (early warning system) to prevent disruption of trade and congestion on border crossings is being discussed between the Commission services and Russian customs. Despite its technical success, the pilot project on exchanges of information has not yet resulted in undisrupted movement of trade flows. To implement the Framework, experts groups have been set up to explore ways to cooperate on risk management, operators' reliability, exchanges on information and to identify the areas for convergence of legislation.

An evaluation will be carried out based on two projects: the "Laufzettel" project on the measurement of border crossing times and the evaluation project on the functioning of bordercrossing points and procedures. The Commission and the Working Group will continue to monitor the situation and to engage with Russia through our regular dialogue. The deadline for finalisation of the project has not been determined yet.

  6.6. “Monitor border situations” by re-launching the "Laufzettel" project, originally carried out in 2001, 2003 and 2005, with the objective of measuring border crossing/clearance times and identifying bottlenecks as well as opportunities to improve control procedures at the EU-Russian border. (Lead: European Commission, DG Taxud/EU-Russia Working Group on Customs Border Issues; Deadline for finalisation: second half of 2010) FAST TRACK

Report: The EU and Russia have agreed that progress on the implementation of the customs cooperation strategy will need to be evaluated in due time. One of the major inputs to this evaluation will be a re-launch of the "Laufzettel" project, with the purpose being to provide an exact measurement of the time needed to complete the different phases involved in crossing the EU-Russia border. In addition, a more complete evaluation project to monitor the practical effects of the strategy should be carried out under the Common Space Facility. The project will provide practical recommendations on how to facilitate the movement of goods between the EU and Russia in line with the strategy.

  6.7. “Coordinate the use of the digital dividend.” Coordination of the use of the digital dividend that will be available in the transition to digital television transmitted on land for a more effective use of frequencies and to add benefits to companies to offer broadband in sparsely populated areas. Development of enhanced models for cooperation between Member States for multilateral coordination and market control (Lead: Sweden. Deadline: to be determined).

Report: Information missing

PA 7: To exploit the full potential of the Region in research and Coordinated

innovation by Sweden and Poland

During the first stage of the implementation process, the Priority Area Coordinators have focused on getting the Flagship Projects started. Regular meetings of the PACs and the Flagship Project Leaders have been successfully organised to facilitate cooperation. So far, the design and planning of the Flagships have to a large extent been funded by existing national or EU sources; however, there is a wish to explore the possibilities of financial engineering. Cooperation between Interact Point Turku, FP 7.2 "Create a Baltic Sea Fund for innovation and research", and the PACs, using BSR Stars as a test case, has already been initiated to explore this possibility.

Flagship Projects 7.1 "BSR Stars", and 7.4 "BSR Health Region" have both developed a wellfunctioning governance structure, which has allowed the project leaders to formulate their visions and goals, develop strategies and activity plans, take decisions about priorities and initiate new cooperation. The PACs recommend the example of the High Level Group of BSR Stars, with 1-2 representatives from each participating country (BSR EU members, Norway and Iceland), as a good governance structure that could perhaps be useful to other EUSBSR Flagships.

Both FP 7.1 and 7.4 are now in the first phase of implementation. They are co-funded by the Baltic Sea Region Programme 2007-13, and 7.4 also from the South Baltic Programme. Both Flagships have applied and/or will apply to other sources of funding to be able to initiate more activities.

Cooperation between the BONUS secretariat and BSR Stars is being developed in order to jointly broaden the BONUS programme to also include clean tech innovation and ecoinnovation. The BONUS secretariat has found the BSR Stars to be a suitable partner, facilitating the inclusion of innovation competences and persons responsible for innovation in ministries and innovation agencies of the BSR countries. Without the EUSBSR this had not been possible.

Flagship Project 7.2, led by the Skane Region in Sweden, is now developing its governance structure and work plan. It has already been able to initiate interesting dialogues on future funding within the field of innovation.

Flagship Project 7.5 "Setting up a science link" is today a cooperation project between DESY/Hamburg and the Swedish Research Council. The FPLs have started to create a network which initially will be focused on materials research in a broad sense. Considerable parts of research in the life sciences are focused on new research infrastructures (MAX IV / ESS / XFEL / PETRA III). The initiative has the potential to provide positive stimulus to the entire region by letting more researchers gain access to the facilities.

Actions:

Strategic actions:

  “Establish a common Baltic Sea Region innovation strategy” which will address the following four challenges: (a) reduce existing innovation barriers, including the harmonisation of different legal and regulatory environments for Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), particularly for further developing the Lead Market initiative; (b) facilitate transnational cooperation for the development and commercial exploitation of joint research projects; (c) utilise together the high-level human capital in the Region and promote the mobility of researchers; and (d) jointly develop new and better innovation support instruments, including Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) support. This work will liaise with similar efforts undertaken under the PRO-INNO Europe initiative for the period 2009-12.

Report: The PACs point out that this strategic action should be based on the results of all the Flagship Projects. Parts of such a strategy are currently being developed within the governance structures of the Flagship Projects. In order to develop a more complete strategy, a pre-study, defining focus, ambitions, boundaries and funding, is needed.

Cooperative actions:

  “Improve the exploitation of research through patents” by fostering increased cooperation between national patent authorities in the Baltic Sea Region in providing innovation support facilities. “Sector specialisation among the different authorities” in the Baltic Sea Region and the ability to assist on applications made to other Baltic Sea Region countries and to the European Patent Office (EPO) are ideas that could be part of such cooperation. Support should be provided to SMEs, individual inventors and public research organisations to integrate IPR into their business strategies.

Report: The Swedish Patent Agency has, with its own resources, developed a database with more than 17 000 documents, which it will be possible to use for clean tech and eco innovation projects within the BSR.

Flagship Projects (as examples):

  7.1. “Develop a Baltic Sea Region Programme for Innovation, Clusters and SME etworks”. The concrete objective is to foster R&D and business-related transnational

collaboration covering innovation systems, clusters and SME networks, in order to strengthen economic growth in the whole Baltic Sea Region. The Programme will establish "a new Baltic Sea Region brand", building on "smartness", research, innovation and cooperation, leading to capacity-building, stronger international competitiveness, increased foreign investments and world-class actors in some strategic areas. The Programme can be built upon the results and recommendations of the BSR-Network INNO-Net project, funded under the PRO INNO Europe initiative. The objective is to improve Baltic Sea Region competitiveness and innovation through transnational cluster cooperation both at policy and business level by mobilising cluster organisations, national or regional programmes and funds. Activities under this Baltic Sea Region programme will also include the development of a "Baltic Sea Region" method for better exploiting small business networks. Due to the importance of the maritime economy for the Region, maritime clusters will be promoted in order to link them to knowledge networks and to exchange best practices on the establishment of cluster organisations. In addition, an objective is to “develop a regional foresight programme”, which will help with identifying desirable directions of cooperation in R&D and innovation. (Lead: Sweden

and Lithuania; Deadline for progress review: to be determined) FAST TRACK

Report: The long-term vision is to establish the BSR as a functional region 22 recognised by

global actors as the best innovation space hosting and deploying world-class expertise and strategic alliances in selected fields by using the Grand Challenges approach as its main logic. This approach identifies societal needs and challenges of the present time such as health, energy, clean water and climate change, and needs collaboration between different countries as well as between public and private actors. The aim is for the BSR in 2020 to be recognised as the most agile macro-region in the world in capabilities that require multi-disciplinary research and education, innovative and mobile talent as well as attractive business environments for companies, capital and policy learning.

The rationale behind BSR STARS is to increase innovation capacity by creating larger critical mass of R&I resources, creating a larger home market for businesses (especially for SMEs) and developing complementary competencies for new types of collaboration.

By linking and deploying the whole resource base of the BSR, the BSR STARS is aimed at shaping, expanding and integrating the market space and the resource base of the Region. The BSR STARS will develop collaboration for innovation work, ensuring it attracts other strong cooperation milieus worldwide. The BSR STARS will introduce systemic ways of working together.

The BSR Stars programme, including strategy and activity plans for 2011-20, has been developed and approved by all 10 countries represented in the BSR Stars High Level Group (BSR EU members, Norway and Iceland). The governance structure of BSR Stars, with a High Level Group with representatives from ministries and innovation agencies in 10 countries, has proven to work well and created a platform for shared strategic actions in the area of innovation. The operational part, with three taskforces, has developed the action plan, but not yet started to implement the activities.

A project called Stardust was approved for co-funding by the BSR programme 2007-13 in September 2010. More than 60 partners / associated partners from 10 countries are involved in Stardust. This project will test new instruments and tools for transnational cooperation in four different thematic areas: clean tech, health, telecommunication and sustainable transport. Five different projects will develop strategies to obtain global leading positions in their respective field.

Finland has allocated recourses from national funds to two projects connected with BSR Stars, one is a food consortium between Finland, Sweden, Poland, Iceland, Denmark and Estonia and the other is the health project within Stardust.

BSR Stars is also a test case for FP 7.2 in its work to propose more efficient models for funding transnational cooperation on innovation. It is hoped that this work will influence the next EU budget period 2014-20.

  7.2. “Create a Baltic Sea Fund for Innovation and Research”. The aim is to develop financial instruments that promote transnational and transregional innovation and research focussing on the specific strengths of the Baltic Sea Region. This will be achieved by

matters for innovation.

48 using both tested and successful financial models as well as by developing new ones that will support the coordination of existing funding (2007-13) as well as future funding (2014-onwards) for research, development and innovation at the EU, national and regional levels, as well as private funding. (Lead: Region Skåne. Deadline for finalisation: to be determined)

Report: The aim of this Flagship is to develop financial instruments that promote transnational and transregional innovation and research. In focus is both the coordination of different funding sources at the EU, national and regional levels as well as private funding within the existing programme period (2007-13) and the next programme period (2014-20).

The Flagship is in the phase of collecting information on obstacles and opportunities related to the existing financial structure for the implementation of Flagship Projects within EUSBSR PA 7. This work is pursued in close cooperation with the Flagship 7.1.

During 2010, the Lead Partner of the project investigated the financial conditions for the Flagship itself and found the right partners in the project. The managing phase of the Flagship was expected to be completed by June 2011.

  7.3. “Develop a common Baltic Sea Region strategy to promote services innovation”. This will have three main objectives: (a) to collect better statistical data from Baltic Sea Region countries to analyse the current status and potential of innovation in the sector of knowledge-intensive services; (b) to identify the scope and objectives for transnational cooperation between clusters operating in the service sub-sectors such as ICT, creative industries and the cultural sector in general, eco/green-innovation and energy; and (c) to improve the framework conditions that are needed to support such cluster cooperation in the domain of services in a sustainable way, as well as to facilitate the internationalisation of high-growth service businesses. This work will liaise with relevant EU INNO-Net policy projects funded under the PRO INNO Europe initiative for the period 2009-12. (Lead: Lithuania and Finland; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: The PACs proposed that this project be included under FP 7.1

  7.4. “Set up cross-sectoral reference projects for innovation in health and life sciences”: The promotion of public health on a high level and the exploitation of modern life sciences can be regarded as prerequisites for the Baltic Sea Region becoming a globally leading and prosperous "Health Region". Furthermore, the demographic challenges can only be met with innovations in science, technology and social science. The ScanBalt BioRegion, today one of Europe's leading cluster collaborations, introduced the basic principles of sustainability in 2004 within all fields of life sciences whether health, energy, nutrition, or environmental life sciences. The Baltic Sea Region can in this sense be regarded as a model for providing the basis for a knowledge-based economy and for implementing a shared strategy together in a sustainable way in a broad spectrum of activities. (Lead: Lithuanian Biotechnology Association and BioCon Valley® GmbH, Greifswald (Germany); Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: The aim of this Flagship Project is to assist in promoting a knowledge-based, globally competitive health economy in the BSR and in solving the grand societal challenges of health within the Region, and to play a strong role in global health.

The ScanBalt Health Region (SBHR) serves as an umbrella for a multitude of coordinated activities applying shared visions and values for the development of the Region and utilising a common communication and coordination structure. It promotes a bottom-up approach combined with a top-down advisory structure, which has been developed, tested and applied for the ScanBalt BioRegion since 2001. The SBHR Modus operandi is the result of intense dialogue and consultation with key stakeholders throughout the BSR.

The ScanBalt Health Region has published two position papers: in February 2011 “Healthy Ageing: From biological fundamentals to clinical solutions“, and in March 2011 “EU Cohesion policies and the importance of macro-regions and regional clusters for smart growth and smart specialisation”. The ScanBalt Forum “Towards balanced regional development and smart specialisation between clusters” will be organised on 21-24 September 2011, where discussion, reporting and coordination on the ScanBalt Health Region will be a major topic.

  7.5. “Setting up a Baltic Science Link”. Research infrastructure is important for a region that aims to be at the forefront of research and innovation. The Baltic Sea Region has several important existing infrastructure installations (the high-energy PETRA-III storage ring at the German Synchrotron Research Centre in Hamburg; the European X-Ray Laser project XFEL in Schleswig-Holstein; the MAXIV, Synchrotron Radiation Research, Nuclear Physics and Accelerator Physics lab in Lund) and is hoping for support for further

ones like the European Spallation Source (ESS) in Lund 23 . This infrastructure should be

used optimally to strengthen the scientific capability and competitiveness as well as the attractiveness of the Region. This could be accomplished by building a strong network between universities, research institutes and industries in the Region, i.e. the Baltic Science Link. Already strong research fields in the Region – life sciences and material technologies – would form the core of these scientific clusters. (Lead: Sweden: Swedish

Research Council; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: Baltic Science Link aims to create a network to ensure that research exchange programmes are created. These programmes can include local nodes of development within the relevant areas of research. It is hoped that the network will deepen cooperation in those areas where it is active, leading to joint ventures and investments. However, this will require that funding for these activities be made available. The network will initially be focused on materials research in a broad sense, in which important parts of research in the life sciences are especially focused on the new research infrastructures (MAX IV / ESS / XFEL / PETRA III). The initiative has the potential to provide positive stimulus to the entire region by letting more researchers gain access to the facilities.

The project today is a cooperation between DESY/Hamburg and the Swedish Research Council, and there are several sub-projects on the way. The main activities are currently the sub-projects Science Link (SL) and Baltic Science Link 1 (BSL 1), and overall coordination. Science Link is the precursor project, mainly aimed at industrial users of the research infrastructures, while Baltic Science Link 1 is aimed at the build-up of academic users and a transnational access programme. Both sub-projects are awaiting funding decisions.

23 A joint project for the European Research Area. ESS Scandinavia is a consortium working to ensure ESS will

be built in Lund. The consortium consists of all the universities and colleges in the Öresund Region, a number of other leading universities and research institutes in Scandinavia as well as the Skåne Region, Lund Municipality, Copenhagen Capacity and the Öresund Committee.

The mapping, which is and will continue to be part of the coordination activities, needs to be continued as there are still areas which are not clear and contact that needs to be made. For example, the relationship has to be clarified with existing projects/networks that have similar goals, such as the existing network of academics within the macro-region.

PA 8: Implementing the Small Business Act: to promote Coordinated

entrepreneurship, strengthen SMEs and increase the efficient use by Denmark

of human resources and Germany

Four ministries are involved in the coordination of this Priority Area 24 , chaired by the

Danish Enterprise and Construction Authority (DECA). The DECA is responsible for gathering information from the other Priority Area Coordinators in relation to reporting to the Commission, and is also in charge of showcasing the results during the Annual Forums, creating the website and participating in Strategy-level meetings. DECA also organised the kick-off meeting of the PA. The PAC reports that the internal coordination among the four ministries has been challenging, and points to poor communication and

participation as main issues.

Seven out of the eight strategic and cooperative actions under this Priority Area are progressing. “Rural Entrepreneurship” is the only action with no project activity so far. As regards the Flagship Projects, six out of the eight projects are either being implemented or have recently applied for project funding in connection with the 4th Call of the BSR Programme. Several Flagships consist of more than one project, and in addition several cross-border projects, e.g. from the Central Baltic Programme, have been labelled as

supporting the implementation of PA 8.

Collaboration with Baltic Development Forum has been set up in order to identify potential projects within the strategic actions on “female entrepreneurship” and “trade and

investment promotion”.

The DECA now plans to continue the work of monitoring the implementation of already ongoing projects and work on project development within a few prioritized areas, where

there is believed to be momentum for gathering partners and potential for creating valueadding projects. One opportunity that has been identified concerns pursuing project development activities within areas such as “female entrepreneurship”, “trade and investment promotion” and “promoting young entrepreneurs”.

Actions:

Strategic actions:

  “Promote trade and attract more investments into the Baltic Sea Region” through better cooperation between trade and investment promotion bodies in order to further enhance the tools provided by the Member States in this area. Further enhanced collaboration between trade and investment agencies in the Region would be of benefit for intraregional trade, as well as for the trade of companies from the Region with countries outside.

Report: The partners involved at this stage are the Danish Enterprise and Construction Authority (DECA) and Baltic Development Forum (BDF). The latter is also involved in the

24 The Danish Enterprise and Construction Authority, the Danish Ministry of Education, the Danish Ministry of

Employment, and the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

project BaltMetPromo, which is partly focusing on investment promotion, and thus also contributing to the implementation of this action. DECA is not working within the area of trade and investment promotion. Therefore, the BDF has been engaged to produce a report on how cooperation between trade and investment promotion bodies can be improved in order to promote trade and investments in the EU Members States of the Region.

The report, which is expected in May 2011, discusses the nature of trade and investment promotion, maps the most important investment and trade promotion bodies and efforts in the BSR, provides an overview of current trends in trade and investments in the BSR, identifies challenges to regional collaboration in the field and suggests recommendations for future action. It focuses mainly on national, public or semi-public trade and investment promotion bodies, even if significant trade or investment promotion efforts of other bodies can be covered, such as private and sub-national and pan-Baltic bodies. Both intra-regional and extra-regional trade and investments are covered.

The BDF report suggests a number of short-term and long-term actions. In the short-term, BDF and DECA will attempt to invite relevant trade and investment promotion bodies to the next policy roundtable of the BaltMetPromo meeting in May. The purpose of this is to raise awareness of the report and invite participants to discuss how to establish a more permanent collaboration. A tentative follow-up meeting is planned to be scheduled back-to-back with the EUSBSR Annual Forum/BDF Summit in October 2011.

  “Secure access to capital for SMEs” for instance by promoting and introducing new and innovative tools that facilitate the access to capital in the Region, particularly at an early phase of their development. Examples could involve cross-border venture capital funds and cross-border guarantee schemes that would make it possible to exploit economies of scale and scope when investing in SMEs or guaranteeing their lending. The EU financial instruments of the Competitiveness and Innovation Programme, as well as the Structural Funds should be used extensively and in an effective way in order to secure finance for SMEs where current market conditions are difficult. The EU sources for SME finance should be complemented by national and regional financing.

Report: The project JOSEFIN aims to bring forward innovative products of SMEs to improve the transnational commercial activity of these companies. In order to reach its goals the JOSEFIN partnership includes relevant organisations for business development, such as public authorities responsible for the development and implementation of policies, public financial institutions as well as research and technology development organisations.

The main achievement of the project will be the implementation of a “JOSEFIN Innovation Loan Guarantee” for improved access to finance for innovative SMEs in all regions involved in the project. These new financial instruments under the JOSEFIN umbrella will provide back-up to commercial banks which issue loans, guarantees, seed capital or venture capital to SMEs. The financial risk of transnational activities for companies and financial institutions involved will thus be reduced. This will boost cooperation and international activities of enterprises. SMEs will have better access to financing and will be assisted by individual advisory and coaching services. For financial institutions, a new risk sharing model for saver credit provision will be implemented. This model will allow a more realistic assessment of the creditworthiness of SMEs.

  “Encourage and promote female entrepreneurship" to support economic growth and jobs in the Baltic Sea Region. There is a need to enhance entrepreneurship of women by targeting actions at young women and second-career women who are starting up or thinking about changing their professional activities. Policy-makers and SME stakeholders in the Baltic Sea Region should be encouraged to increase and promote the spirit of enterprise amongst women. To create a favourable climate for female entrepreneurship, contextual, economic and soft factors that hinder the start-up and growth of women’s enterprises need to be addressed.

Report: The partners involved are the Danish Enterprise and Construction Authority, Baltic Development Forum (BDF) and relevant coordinating authorities in the Region. BDF has produced a report mapping female entrepreneurship policy at the European and national level that encompasses all of the Baltic Sea Region countries as well as Iceland, Norway and Russia. The purpose of the report is to inspire and raise awareness of the existing policies and initiatives that the countries have implemented to promote female entrepreneurs. The target group for the report is primarily policy-makers and relevant bodies working with female entrepreneurs. The report will be published in March/April 2011. The Danish Enterprise and Construction Authority covers the expenses for the report. If the financial resources are present (e.g. as part of the technical assistance programme), a seminar/conference will be held for policy-makers/practitioners in 2011. The objective of a seminar is to discuss new ideas and explore opportunities for collaboration across the Region.

  “Jointly develop entrepreneurship in offshore renewable energy, particularly wind, to make the Baltic Sea Region a lead region in this field”. Offshore renewable energy is one of the growing maritime sectors. Pioneer work and the development of innovative technologies have been done by small and medium-sized enterprises and these economic structures will continue to be important for the sector's development. Strengthening entrepreneurship in the Baltic Sea Region in this field could lead to the development of a lead market initiative for renewable and clean energy. The conditions and ongoing activities in Denmark, Germany and Sweden as well as the gas transport from Russia make the Region more or less already the hotspot for innovation and new developments in this field. The Baltic Sea Region states could take a leading role in a broader European development through e.g. listing the main technology challenges and demonstrating the main regulatory obstacles in anticipating a Europe-wide debate on offshore renewable energy. The horizontal action on Maritime Spatial Planning (see below) can be beneficial for this action. Support for "green businesses" more generally is vital.

Report: Please refer to the 2010 report on the EUSBSR webpage. DECA is still trying to involve the Danish test and demonstration facility Lindoe Offshore Renewables Center, which is one of the leading knowledge centres within offshore renewable energy. The organisation has expressed interest in a BSR project, but so far the discussions have not let to concrete actions.

  “Entrepreneurship training as part of the school curricula”. Entrepreneurship should be included at all levels of education including at university level, teachers should be provided with appropriate knowledge and innovative teaching methods, and an entrepreneurial culture should be established. This should be done with the involvement of local business. Universities in the Baltic Sea Region should be encouraged to increase the spirit of enterprise and to create a favourable climate for entrepreneurship, not only addressed to business and economics students. Measures should include support for university start-up companies, spin-offs and specific teacher training.

Report: No report received

“Facilitate rural entrepreneurship” by establishing programmes for education and crossborder exchanges, making full use of funding available in the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development in support of SMEs.

Report: No report received

Cooperative actions:

  “Increase labour mobility” not only within but also into the labour markets by promoting increased transnational cooperation in reducing borders and enhancing mobility. Cooperation between municipalities, regions and Member States is an important way to increase the efficiency of the support instruments, allowing for the mutual exchange of experience, analysis of future topics and looking at procedures for implementation and comparison of performance. Fostering deeper cooperation between job agencies in the Baltic Sea Region and promoting better links between labour training, retraining and advanced training and the labour market needs in the entire region are vital aspects. Another important issue is the mutual recognition of qualifications, which requires cooperation between the relevant control bodies. The maritime cluster can benefit from labour mobility between land-based and sea-based jobs and careers, as well as a more transparent and higher-level system for qualification for maritime professions. Actions are detailed in chapters 4-13.

Report: For the moment, the action mainly consists of the work of the Flagship Project "Baltic Sea Labour Network" (BSLN).

  “Initiate an exchange of good practices in the area of administrative simplification of start-ups, licenses and bankruptcy procedures” based on the recommendations from the Small Business Act.

Report: The database of good practices is now running. The contact points have already announced more than 90 cases in the fields of the Small Business Act.

Flagship Projects (as examples):

  8.1.Promote young entrepreneurs”: Cooperation between education and business sectors is important for creating sustainable growth. A joint initiative should be developed to focus on encouraging young entrepreneurship, as well as promoting and making financial resources available for developing young entrepreneurs’ mobility and for crossborder networks for young entrepreneurs in the Baltic Sea Region (Lead: Denmark; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: No report received from the PAC (Charlotte Romlund Hansen, Danish Ministry of Education)

  8.2. “Develop deeper cooperation on environmental technology to create new business opportunities”. To strengthen SMEs in the environmental technology sector, a stronger critical mass in knowledge and technology has to be created involving both RTD (research) and enterprises. Joint actions should include increased cooperation in export promotion. (Lead: Poland; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: Consists of three projects: BioNutCut, DeepEntech and eFrontrunners (all are in the application phase):

BioNutCut

The BioNutCut project aims to advance the uptake of biogas technology in the treatment of organic wastes and side streams from municipalities, industry and agriculture in the Baltic Sea Region, by facilitating dissemination of innovations in biogas technologies across the BSR, promoting transnational transfer of biogas technology and knowledge and preparation of investments in biogas technologies in the target countries. The project also intends to enhance the business opportunities of SMEs in this field by facilitating the dissemination of innovations, increasing cross-border networking and trade relations, and attracting more investments into the BSR

In the Baltic Sea Region obstacles to trade and investments still exist at the practical level, and it has proven difficult for SMEs in the biogas business to benefit optimally from the internal market and successfully expand their activities to their neighbouring countries. The BioNutCut project addresses this topic by facilitating dissemination of innovations in biogas technologies across the BSR, promoting transnational transfer of biogas technology and knowledge and reducing the non-tariff barriers to trade and investments in and between BSR countries. Another aim is to enhance the business opportunities of SMEs in this field by increased cross-border networking and trade relations and by attracting more investments into the Baltic Sea Region.

DeepEntech

The strategic objective of the Project is to strengthen SMEs in the environmental technology sector. A stronger critical mass in knowledge and technology has to be created involving both R&D and enterprises. It will also aim at increased cooperation in export promotion to target markets outside the BSR.

Priority environmental technologies for the project are: sustainable construction, energy efficiency, water treatment, waste and materials recycling. Six potential markets in the world have been identified but two or maximum three will be selected as target markets for technology promotion. The partnership consists of six partners from four BSR countries (Germany, Lithuania, Sweden and Poland), but the lead partner is also looking for other partners or network partners.

eFrontrunner

“Energy efficient frontrunner” is a new concept that will increase the use of energy-efficient technology. Help will be given to eco-solutions provided by SMEs so that they can reach a wider market in the whole Baltic Sea Region and cities/regions will become more competitive.

By appointing frontrunners that are taking the lead in using energy-efficient solutions, the project will inspire more organisations in the public sector to become new frontrunners. eFrontrunner boosts the knowledge transfer from frontrunners to adepts, in cooperation with SMEs. Adepts are given the possibility to learn from the best, by preparing investment plans for their own projects at home. The project has a valuable impact on cross-border cooperation between public authorities and private companies, and influences the development of the European market with large benefits for cities by saving energy costs and pushing forward good ideas of local companies. The Europe 2020 strategy emphasizes green growth, so the project will support this strategy with its work and with the implementation of concrete actions. The project is cooperating with the DeepEntech project as well as the SPIN project.

  8.3. “Implement the project Sustainable Production through Innovation in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises”. The aim is to increase the innovation potential in SMEs to enhance their sustainable production processes, thereby increasing company profits whilst reducing economic and environmental costs. (Project financed by the ‘Baltic Sea Region’ Programme under the ‘territorial cooperation’ objective of the ERDF; total budget €3 million over 3.5 years). (Lead: Germany; Deadline for progress review: to be determined) FAST TRACK

Report: SPIN (Sustainable Production through Innovation in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises) aims at supporting SMEs to implement existing eco-innovations. At the 3rd partner meeting it was decided to focus on the thematic fields of construction, decentralised water management, surface treatment and energy from biomass/biogas. Several industry workshops addressing these topics and bringing together the demand and supply side of ecoinnovations have successfully been held in different partner countries. A SPIN synthesis report based on the findings of specific country studies on barriers and incentives for innovations for sustainable production in SMEs has been developed, a draft version is also available on the project website. SPIN partners are located in Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Lithuania, Poland and Germany. The SPIN innovation database was launched in May 2010, comprising 200 innovation examples up to now ( www.spin-project.eu ).

  8.4. “Make the Baltic Sea an Eco-efficient region” e.g. by establishing a network on green public procurement where good practice and experience are exchanged. Focal points should be established in all Baltic Sea Region Member States to increase knowledge and disseminate information. (Lead: Germany and Sweden; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: The Flagship is organised in two parts:

Part I – The project “Eco-Region”, led by Germany, is geared towards turning the Baltic Sea Region into one of the world's leading areas in terms of competitiveness and ecological sustainability. Within the framework of the project, 10 model regions develop strategic sustainability programmes with clearly defined goals. In addition, selected measures are implemented directly. Valuable knowledge is compiled in cooperation with the Baltic21 sectors (e.g. industry, education, energy and transport), the model regions and additional stakeholders. Contacts for various topics (e.g. environmentally-oriented public procurement, sustainability in production and consumption) are identified and the data made available to interested groups through a digital database. In addition to knowledge transfer, policy recommendations are developed, e.g. a contribution to the new Baltic21 Strategy 2010-15 with a strategic focus on topics such as the promotion of eco-innovation in SMEs.

So far five partner conferences have taken place to promote knowledge transfer within the regions, the final conference being scheduled for the end of November in Poland. Online access to the database has been available since summer 2010. Initial publications and studies have been developed e.g. on climate change, sustainability in production and consumption, innovation and education in the field of sustainable development, sustainable urban and rural development, sustainable tourism and territorial cohesion.

Part II – Establishing a network on green public procurement, led by Sweden: A network of national focal points for green public procurement (GPP) has been established in the Baltic Sea Region. The purpose of the network is to form a platform for exchanging knowledge, good practice, experience, ideas and information on GPP with the aim being to support an eco-efficient economy in the Region. Two meetings have taken place, in September 2010 and January 2011, to discuss the aim of the network, the more specific needs of the Member States, and how to work. The network has identified several topics of common interest and intends to develop concrete projects on some of them as well as continue to develop the network. An initial concrete project is under development with the aim being to establish a capacity-building programme on GPP within the Region. The project will apply for funding from the BSR programme. A website for the network has also been created.

  8.5. “Make the most of the European Code of Best Practices Facilitating Access by SMEs to Public Procurement" in order to help them to tackle the remaining problems which hamper their development. (Lead: Germany; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: Please consult the 2010 EUSBSR Report

  8.6. “Make the Baltic Sea Region a leader in design”. The States in the Region have both potential and experience to build on in the field of design development and have initiated cooperation in this area. There are some similar features in design originating from the Region and this should be marketed in a joint way. Dissemination of good practices related to the Baltic Sea basin design can take place through thematic conferences and exhibitions of good practices, as well as festivals: e.g. Gdynia Design Days. (Lead: Poland; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: No progress so far.

  8.7. “Implement the Baltic Sea Labour etwork project”. The project aims at improving the management and harmonisation of the common labour market issues in the Baltic Sea Region based on joint transnational strategies. In particular, demographic changes and migration processes will be taken into account. (Project financed by the ‘Baltic Sea Region’ Programme under the ‘territorial cooperation’ objective of the ERDF; total budget €2.6 million over 3.5 years). (Lead: Germany: Behörde für Wissenschaft und Forschung der Freien und Hansestadt Hamburg; Deadline for finalisation: to be determined) FAST TRACK

Report: The project will share knowledge and ideas to promote positive change in the labour markets of the Region. Focusing on the areas of mobility of labour, active labour market policy, training and education, and the development of human resources, the BSLN is working to strengthen dialogue and open new communication channels with the objective of achieving sustainable development in labour market policies. In doing so, BSLN wants to establish the Baltic Sea Region as a model for sustainable labour market development in Europe.

The project partners have started four pilot projects at the national level and one at the transnational level as well as carried out studies which are all published on the BSLN webpage. The pilot project’s topics are social dialogue and labour mobility. An ongoing study identifies and analyses labour market strategies in the BS states. All results will be collected in a final publication at the end of 2011. At the transnational level, the project’s tripartite Steering Committee has agreed already on three statements, two will follow. All statements together will be published as labour market strategy recommendations in the final publication.

A forum for Social Dialogue in the Baltic Sea Region has been established. Members include representatives of both employer and employee organisations as well as of governments and parliaments. Russia will be included. The 1st annual forum roundtable will be held at the BSLN final conference in November 2011 in Hamburg.

  8.8. “Cooperation between Public Employment services", including information on job offers and on working conditions and residence in the Baltic Sea Region through better use of the European portal dedicated to job mobility, EURES. (Lead: Sweden, Arbetsformedlingen (Public Employment Services); Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: No progress

PA 9: To reinforce sustainability of agriculture, forestry and Coordinated

fisheries by Finland and

Lithuania for rural development and Sweden for fisheries

The Priority Area Coordinators report that the Flagship Projects in Priority Area 9 have generally succeeded in identifying and using several different funding sources for their activities and/or start-up phase.

As a result of the EUSBSR, the cooperation forum Baltfish has been established. The primary goal of Baltfish is to improve and strengthen coordination and cooperation of fisheries administration among Baltic Sea Member States, but also among the administrations and other key stakeholders relevant for Baltic Sea fisheries. It is a forum for exchanging ideas, views and information and a forum that can facilitate joint forces in various concrete projects aiming at achieving sustainable fisheries in the Baltic.

The Flagship Project Baltic MANURE started only recently but the project has already formed a cluster that includes four agri-environmental projects – BalticDEAL (FP 1.4), Baltic COMPASS and Beras Implementation. All the four projects have a common goal – to reduce leaching of nutrients from agriculture to the Baltic Sea. They work together, although in different fields, to reach this objective. The PACs point to this as a good example of cooperation between the various priorities of the EUSBSR.

The organisations involved in the Sustainable forest management in the Baltic Sea Region – EFI ORD Flagship – Priority Area Coordinator Finland, EFINORD, and the Nordic Forest Research Cooperation Committee (SNS) – have agreed to cooperate under a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). The MoU presents a vision for the EFINORD Flagship, and outlines the modus operandi of cooperation, including the criteria to accept new projects in the EFINORD Flagship. The MoU will help keep cooperation focused on bringing added value to the BSR. Out of the seven projects, five are getting started or are already ongoing. Several of these projects are interested in finding Russian partners.

The Flagship Project “Sustainable Rural Development” has been financed by National Rural Networks of the Rural Development Programmes and, thus, introduced cooperation between EAFRD programmes and the EUSBSR. The earlier established Nordic-Baltic cooperation of the National Rural Networks has now been extended to cover the whole Baltic Sea Region. The cooperation between EAFRD programmes will also continue through the common action coordinated by Lithuania.

Several Flagship Projects under Priority Area 9 were agreed on jointly between the Member States and stakeholders at the second joint Priority Area seminar in January 2010. The PACs believe that the joint agreement has had a positive influence on the commitment to the projects and their objectives. The PACs also point out that the EUSBSR has contributed to the reinforcement of many already existing networks, e.g. at the Nordic-Baltic level as well as their extension to cover the whole Baltic Sea Region. Nevertheless, they point out that the commitment to EUSBSR activities varies considerably between the Member States, and that this should be one of the challenges looked at during the coming year.

Actions:

Strategic actions:

  “Continue the adaptation of the Baltic fishing fleet capacity to the available resources”. Evaluate the economic performance of the fleet segments and apply necessary measures to adjust fishing capacity to a level in-line with the available resource using national means or regulations within the framework of the CFP. Through the European Fisheries Fund (EFF) Operational Programmes, EU Member States have an opportunity to address the overcapacity of their fleet through the implementation of the fishing effort adjustment plans.

Report: The cooperation in the fisheries section has been established within the four Flagship Projects (9.1, 9.2, 9.4 and 9.5)

  “Improve control and stop illegal fishing”. Enhancement of national quota utilisation and fisheries control and inspection, especially by high-tech monitoring and surveillance, improved coordination and harmonisation among Member States. An effective traceability system based on existing legislation and further analysis of developments should be established. The Copenhagen Declaration on combating unreported cod fishery in the Baltic Sea should be implemented.

Report: The cooperation in the fisheries section has been established within the four Flagship Projects (9.1, 9.2, 9.4 and 9.5)

Cooperative actions:

  “Develop sustainable strategies for wood” within the framework of Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) and Research and Development programmes in order to develop a common Baltic Sea Region approach. Forestry research undertaken by the Nordic Council of Ministers should be exploited. The strategies would be placed in the broader context of national forest programmes or similar and/or national renewable energy plans, balancing supply of wood raw material to the forest-based industries, renewable energy development, nature conservation strategies and wood mobilisation.

Report: The development takes place at various independent levels, in close cooperation with the EUSBSR. Activities are supported and facilitated by the Nordic Council of Ministers, and more concretely through the cooperation structures of the Nordic Forest Research Cooperation Committee (SNS). Potentially, the development of sustainable strategies for wood is one of the main directions in the establishment of new Centres of Advanced Research (CAR) under the SNS. In the long run, the strategies developed would be placed in the broader context of national forest programmes or similar and/or national renewable energy plans, balancing supply of wood raw material to the forest-based industries, renewable energy development, nature conservation strategies and wood mobilisation.

  “Enhance the combined effects of the Rural Development Programmes” through better cooperation leading to more targeted measures. The programmes could be linked when dealing with similar problems. There should be a streamlining of the rural development measures in the national Rural Development Programmes, including joint studies and monitoring. There is a need to develop joint training and advisory measures, with more emphasis on common innovation across borders.

Report: The coordinator is the Ministry of Agriculture of the Republic of Lithuania. The principal participants of this common action are EU Member State representatives from Managing Authorities (ministries) together with social, economic and institutional partners. A system of joint learning and training will be addressed to public officers working with the Rural Development Programme (RDP) implementation. Final beneficiaries in the Member States should be involved as well, as they can identify the most urgent issues to be resolved. Rural Networks and Managing Authorities will be invited to discuss together possible ways to simplify implementation, e.g. by looking at application processes, payments and funding.

Lithuania, as the coordinator of this common action, prepared a Questionnaire on common action: "CAP after 2013 – joint learning and training in implementation of the RDP" in accordance with the Priority Area and sent it to the Member States seeking to identify their concrete demands. The questionnaire was oriented to Member State representatives from the Managing Authorities and to their social and economic partners, with the aim of identifying frequently asked questions, a cooperation model, frequency of meetings, etc.

All Member States in the Baltic Sea Region have their own national or federal (regional) Rural Development Programmes. As the Member States developed their own National Strategic Plans and consequently Rural Development Programmes addressing their specific needs, the selections of measures and allocations of funds differ from programme to programme. The administrative systems for implementation also reflect a variation of possible solutions.

As a response, there will be annual meetings for the representatives of the Member States’ Managing Authorities, dealing with the issues of coordination and implementation of the Rural Development Programmes. The aim is to implement rural development initiatives under the Baltic Sea Region more effectively and to form a more unanimous regional position for CAP and rural development issues for the upcoming programming period.

  “Develop strategies for a sustainable use of and breeding with forest, animal and plant genetic resources” that are considered to have positive effects on hindering soil erosion, to minimize the use of acidifying substances, on carbon capture and storage, and finally to conserve genetic diversity. By creating networks within the Baltic Sea Region, the aim will be to strengthen and develop the cooperation in the area by exchanging information, developing competences and giving advice for policy-making. Furthermore, networks’ projects will be developed within different topics, for example: plant genetic resources for agriculture in changing climate, including pre-breeding, forestry, carbon capture and storage and adaptation to climate changes, animal genetic resources, pollution and sustainable breeding programme, education on genetic resources, etc. Actions and experience of the Nordic Council of Ministers should be exploited for further cooperation and development.”

Report: The project "Management and conservation of forest tree genetic resources in the Baltic Sea" under the EFINORD Flagship Project (see below) directly supports this goal. The project consists of two sub-projects: evolutionary genetic pockets for broadleaved tree species and cooperation in breeding Norway spruce.

  “Animal Health and disease control” should be reinforced. Actions and experience of the Nordic Council of Ministers should be exploited for further cooperation and development, including Nordic Baltic cooperation in this field.”

Report: Activities in this field take place within Flagship Project 9.11. “Reinforcement of animal health and disease control”.

  “Enhance the combined effects of the European Fisheries Fund (EFF) programmes” through better cooperation leading to more targeted measures. The programmes could be linked when dealing with similar problems.

Report: The activities regarding fisheries take place within Flagship Projects 9.1, 9.2, 9.4 and 9.5.

Flagship Projects (as examples):

  9.1 “Develop and improve coordination and cooperation among Member States and stakeholders” on fisheries management in the Baltic Sea. A forum called Baltfish has been established to enhance collaboration among Baltic Sea Member States as a first step towards further regionalisation of fisheries management. The forum will work with relevant Baltic Sea organisations including the BS RAC and HELCOM on how integration of concerned stakeholders in fisheries management and policy implementation can be strengthened. The forum will also be developed further in this regard. (Lead: Sweden; Deadline for progress review: 1 June 2010)

Report: To develop and improve coordination and cooperation among Baltic Sea Member States and with stakeholders, a fisheries forum within the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region is being developed. The forum is called Baltfish. Specifically it aims at improving and strengthening coordination and cooperation of fisheries administrators among Baltic Sea Member States, but also among the administrations and other key stakeholders relevant for the Baltic Sea fisheries. It is a forum with a regional perspective for exchanging ideas, views and information, and a forum that can facilitate joint forces in various concrete projects aiming at achieving sustainable fisheries in the Baltic Sea.

The idea is to facilitate ongoing processes by enhanced information and communication, but also to find synergies between ongoing work within these bodies and the Member States. This could be one way of avoiding duplication of work as well as avert potential misunderstandings and misinterpretations. The core of Baltfish is a High Level Group (HLG) consisting of the fisheries directors of the Baltic Sea Member States as well as the director of Baltic Sea fisheries at the Commission.

The High Level Group will meet on a regular basis to discuss issues of common interest. The high level group may invite other stakeholders that are deemed relevant for the discussions in the group. This includes BSRAC, HELCOM and ICES, which are all key organisations in the management of fisheries in the Baltic Sea. A larger meeting is expected to be organised on a regional basis (e.g. once a year). The leader of this Flagship Project is the Swedish Ministry of Agriculture. However, the chairmanship of Baltfish will change each year. The chairmanship of the Baltfish HLG will change each year (i.e. 12-month period) starting with Sweden 2010/2011 then following an agreed order among the Member States. Sweden has the chair until 1 July 2011. Sweden proposes a clockwise order of the chair, meaning SE, FI (2011/12), EE (2012/13), LV (2013/14), LT (2014/15), PL (2015/16), DE (2016/17) and DK (2017/18).

The Commission (DG MARE) has presented a draft paper for a roadmap for the eradication of cod discards in Baltic Sea fisheries. The Baltfish Forum welcomed the draft roadmap, and there has been discussion on the different issues and elements to be included in the roadmap. An open consultation on the draft ended 31 December 2010, and several contributions have been sent to the Commission. See more information in Flagship Project 9.2

  9.2. “Eradicating discards” Even though discard rates are comparatively low in the Baltic Sea, there is scope for measures to reduce or eliminate them. This could be done by establishing joint pilot projects to identify viable solutions including gear modifications or temporal closures. (Lead: Denmark; Deadline for progress review: 1 June 2010)

Report: The aim of eradicating discards in the Baltic Sea is to contribute to more healthy stocks and marine eco-systems, secure the full economic potential of the goods provided by the sea, satisfy growing consumer demands for sustainable fisheries products and gain a more reliable picture of the stock situation and thus strengthen the biological advice.

The Baltic Sea Member States and the European Commission Services decided in October 2009 to establish a technical working group to assess different measures and develop a roadmap to eradicate discards inter alia through the adoption of a discard ban where appropriate.

At the joint EUSBSR Priority Area 9 seminar and Baltfish Forum meeting on 18 November 2010, the Commission (DG MARE) presented a draft paper for a roadmap for the eradication of cod discards in Baltic Sea fisheries, building on among others the conclusions from the technical working group. The roadmap contains an overview of issues such as scope and management relating to discarding in the Baltic Sea, and includes a timeline for the implementation of a combination of measures (2011 to 2013) at the end of which a discard ban in the cod fishery could be introduced following the step-by-step approach laid down in the roadmap.

An open consultation on the draft ended on 31 December 2010, and several contributions have been sent to the Commission. Following this consultation process the Commission is expected to finalise the roadmap.

  9.3. “Sustainable rural development” projects must be developed to bring together people in the Region for sustainable rural development and livelihood, such as supporting the environment for innovations, youth, rural tourism, agriculture and forestry. New practices on using an integrated approach should be developed. (Lead: Poland and Sweden; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: The project is aiming at increased youth involvement in rural societies and a better innovation climate in rural areas. Connecting local, national and transnational projects within the Rural Development Programme, and mainly LEADER, and promoting good practice and benchmarking in the Member States, while seeking common solutions, will help to make rural areas in the Baltic Sea Region more youth-oriented and innovation-friendly.

A steering committee, “The captain's crew”, has been formed, and criteria for the local projects decided. A draft roadmap has been developed and includes: selection of at least two local/national projects per Member State to be members in the Flagship, a meeting with the selected projects in January 2011, common activities during 2011, and a Baltic Sea conference at the end of 2011 with the Flagship themes.

For the local activities, the funding is secured, but for the common actions such as planned conferences and workshops, the funding issue is still not resolved.

The next steps are the common activities performed individually by each member project followed by the general conference at the end of 2011 where decisions will be made for future common activities in 2012 and a final European Conference. Throughout 2011-12, new local projects are welcome to join and contribute to the Flagship by signing a letter of agreement where the terms of reference for participation are stated. By signing the agreement and implementing the stated common activities in the local project, they become members of the Flagship.

  9.4. “Ensure sustainable fishing” by addressing failures and opportunities in the policy, as identified in the Common Fisheries Policy reform process, by developing an ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management. The activity will be carried out in cooperation with public authorities and stakeholders concerned and take into account the recommendations of the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan, best practices and scientific knowledge, including the scientific assessments by ICES and STECF. (Lead: Sweden; Deadline for progress review: 1 June 2010)

Report: The action plan for salmon management in the Baltic Sea expired in 2010 and a new long term management plan (LTMP) will soon become a focus for debate and negotiations. For an LTMP to ensure sustainable fishing, it has to adopt an ecosystem approach. The case of salmon is characterised by high diversity in terms of genetics, life cycle and habitats, fishing methods and users affecting salmon and the habitats essential for its survival. These are dimensions of high relevance to an ecosystem-based LTMP.

This Flagship Project aims at contributing to the LTMP so that salmon populations are not driven into unsustainable situations and remain above the thresholds needed for long-term viability.

A concept paper on the rationale behind the case of Salmon was distributed and used as a base for discussion. Views have been gathered from officers and experts working with salmon in DG Mare, Baltfish, ICES-WG-BAST, BS-RAC, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Coalition Clean Baltic, the HELCOM-SALAR project and the BALTGENE project.

  9.5. “Encourage sustainable aquaculture production methods”. This action is emphasised in the new Commission Communication on aquaculture and can be implemented by the European Fisheries Fund (EFF) Operational Programmes of the EU Member States. (Lead: Finland; Deadline for progress review: 1 June 2010)

Report: The project is concerned with preparing a “Code of Best Practices for Sustainable Aquaculture in the Baltic Region”. The group of experts were to prepare a Draft Code to be presented at the Baltfish meeting in June 2011. The objective is to have a Code that is widely accepted and implemented in decisions that affect Baltic aquaculture.

The Code would establish specific Baltic recommendations or standards for relevant aquaculture issues such as:

Development of novel environmental policy enabling and facilitating the recycling of phosphorus in the Baltic Sea Region, by using feed made of pelagics or other fish caught in the Baltic Sea and developing feed technology.

Endorsement of large-scale and harmonised use of spatial planning tools for more favourable siting of cage farms. The objective of this is to reach economically viable farm sites with fewer local conflicts and environmental harm.

Feasibility and implementation of robust cage farm technology for the more exposed offshore sites, especially in the northern and western parts of the Baltic Sea.

Feasibility and implementation of novel and moderate cost open-air recirculation systems for on-land farming, especially in the southern and eastern parts of the Baltic Sea.

Development of the legal regulatory framework for aquaculture, especially environmental licensing models for ecosystem approaches, considering the net impacts on the sea and including economic incentives for concentration and relocation of units and use of environmentally sustainable feeds and technologies.

  9.7. “Sustainable forest management in the Baltic Sea Region – EFI ORD”

EFINORD interacts with the EU, especially in policy-related issues, and integrates forest research of the Nordic region into Europe. The network should focus on sustainable forest management, reflecting regional issues; primarily biomass production and ecosystem services, which are high on the agenda for forest owners, industry and society at large.

(Lead: NCM/SNS; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

The EFINORD Flagship offers an umbrella for forest and SFM related activities in the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region. The following activities are to be found under the EFINORD umbrella: "Environmental performance of wood" (Lead: Finland / Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry); "Forestry and water protection" (Lead: Sweden / Swedish Forest Agency); “Sustainable Forest Management in Kaliningrad” (Lead: Swedish Forest Agency); "Baltic landscape" (Lead: Sweden / Swedish Forest Agency); "Creating a ordic Baltic information service for forests and forestry" (Lead: Nordic Forest Research Cooperation Committee (SNS) & North European Regional Office of the European Forest Institute (EFINORD); "Management and conservation of forest tree genetic resources in the Baltic Sea Region under changing climate conditions" (Lead: Nordic Centre of Advanced Research in Forest Genetics and Tree Breeding (GeneCAR)); Sub-project 2: "Cooperation in breeding of Norway spruce" (Lead: NordGen Forest); “Hardwoods are good” (Lead: Sweden / Swedish Forest Agency).

Report: The Flagship Project on sustainable forest management in the Baltic Sea Region was established under the newly founded EFINORD, the regional centre of the European Forest Institute (EFI). EFINORD interacts with the EU, especially on policy-related issues, and integrates forest research of the Nordic region into Europe. The network should focus on sustainable forest management, reflecting regional issues, primarily biomass production and ecosystem services, which are high on the agenda for forest owners, industry and society at large. In this sense, EFINORD is well suited to facilitate cooperation and strengthen synergies between the forest projects under the EUSBSR, including reporting and information exchange between the projects. The EFINORD Flagship consists of several independently implemented activities or projects.

At a meeting for the projects within the EFINORD Flagship in Helsinki on November 18th 2010, the organisations involved in the Flagship coordination agreed to join in cooperation under a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). The MoU presents a vision for the EFINORD Flagship, and outlines the modus operandi of cooperation, including the criteria to accept new projects in the EFINORD Flagship. The MoU is made between the Priority Area 9 Coordinator Finland, EFINORD, represented by EFI and the Nordic Council of Ministers, represented by the Nordic Forest Research Cooperation Committee (SNS).

At the beginning of 2011, there were seven projects (one with two sub-projects) under the Flagship. The projects are at various stages of the project cycle. The project "Hardwoods are good" has received funding (€1.2 million from the South Baltic Programme) and implementation is underway. Four projects/activities ("Improving market communication of wood products' environmental values", "Evolutionary genetic pockets for broadleaved tree species", "Cooperation in breeding of Norway spruce" and "Creating a Nordic-Baltic information service for forests and forestry") have received seed money from the Nordic Council of Ministers. The goal of the seed money is to launch the start-up phase and to further develop project activities. A pilot study of the project "Forest management in Kaliningrad" has been conducted. Of the remaining two projects, "Baltic landscape" is seeking funding and "Forestry and water protection" is still at a planning phase.

  9.8. " etwork of institutions for management and conservation of plant genetic resources (PGR) in the BSR under changing climate conditions": The aim is to secure sustainable conservation and use of plant genetic resources relevant for food and agriculture. To accomplish this, networks of institutions within the Region are already established to exchange and develop knowledge within the field. This will be expanded to include long-term cooperation for practical, cost-efficient solutions in the management of GR and thereby strengthen the food security in the Region. The first objective will be to implement the common European database for plant genetic resources (AEGIS) promoting the utilisation of PGR in the Region for breeding and research. This could serve as a model for regional collaboration to other European countries. (Cross-cutting theme B: Climate change) (Lead: NordGen. Deadline for finalisation: to be determined)

Report: The project is led by NordGen. The first workshop on a network of institutions for conservation was organised on 30th November and 1st December 2010 in Tallinn. One of the concrete outcomes was a joint AEGIS application on conservation issues regarding rye. A decision was made to postpone the next workshop on user stakeholders in the Baltic Sea Region until spring 2012. This is due to the wish to obtain as much synergy as possible for a new PGR-Secure project, for the current Vavilov collaboration, as well as for the new upcoming public-private partnership for pre-breeding.

  9.9. “Establish a Forum for Inventive and Sustainable Manure Processing”, BATMA , by the exchange of information on how to process manure in sustainable ways in the Baltic Sea Region to minimise the environmental impact, and to obtain benefits such as renewable energy. (Lead: Denmark Innovation Centre for Bioenergy and Environmental Technology (CBMI) and Finland Agrifood Research, Technology Research and Environmental Research (MTT); Deadline for finalisation: to be determined) FAST TRACK

Report: Increased animal production has resulted in environmental problems such as algal bloom caused by manure-based nutrient surplus and leaching in the Baltic Sea. The Baltic MANURE project will turn the perception of manure as an environmental problem into an opportunity for business innovation. The project develops and utilises the high potential and know-how for innovative solutions for manure management, such as production of renewable energy, organic fertilisers and other added value products.

Key messages from the project are:

• Baltic MANURE is turning manure problems into business opportunities

• Baltic MANURE is the Forum for bringing together all stakeholders to improve manure handling and use in the Baltic Sea Region

• Baltic MANURE improves knowledge, stimulates technology development and marketing and gives policy recommendations

Research activities have been set in motion and during the first phase they will include soil and manure sampling and farm surveys in all countries as well as technology overview and drawing scenarios for life cycle assessment of different manure handling chains. First business-to-business activities will be organised at the Poleko Fair in 2011.

  9.10. "Recycling of Phosphorus". Recycling of phosphorus is an urgent challenge as it is estimated that the world's easily and economically usable phosphorus will last only 50- 150 years. At the same time, the phosphorus load on waters caused by agriculture is a cause for eutrophication. New practices on using an integrated approach should be developed to minimize the leakage of nutrients/phosphorus and to maximize the recycling of all kinds of phosphorus sources in addition to manure. (Lead: Germany together with BATMAN. Deadline for finalisation: to be determined)

Report: Recycling of Phosphorus became a Flagship Project in 2010, the aim being to start the actual work during 2011. Recycling of phosphorus is an urgent challenge as it is estimated that the world's easily and economically usable phosphorus resources will last only 50-150 years. At the same time, the phosphorus load on waters caused by agriculture is a cause for eutrophication. New practices on using an integrated approach should be developed to minimize the leakage of nutrients/phosphorus and to maximise the recycling of all kinds of phosphorus resources in addition to manure.

The project will cover relevant aspects, which are not integral parts of the “Baltic MANURE” project. The leaders of the project are the Julius Kühn-Institut Germany and Agrifood Research Finland (MTT).

  9.11. "Reinforcement of animal health and disease control". In the Nordic-Baltic region, veterinary contingency planning has been on the common agenda for some years and some of the experience will be used in future cooperation in the whole Baltic Sea Region. One example is simulation exercises that are considered as a very valuable tool for testing contingency plans established for the control and eradication of rapid-spreading animal diseases. The efforts made to facilitate training in the Nordic-Baltic region in the use of risk analysis and creation of networks for sharing experiences should be explored. In the event of an animal disease outbreak, the Baltic Sea Region will be working on the intention to provide, within their resource capabilities, skilled and competent personnel to respond to the animal disease situation in the affected country. Actions and experience by the Nordic Council of Ministers should therefore be exploited for further cooperation and development, including Nordic-Baltic cooperation in this field. (Lead: Nordic Council of Ministers; Deadline for progress review: To be determined)

Report: The project is led by the Nordic Council of Ministers. Information was not available at the reporting deadline.

Pillar 3: To make the Baltic Sea Region an accessible and attractive place

PA 10: To improve the access to, and the efficiency and security Coordinated

of, the energy markets by Latvia and

Denmark

Brief summary of overall progress:

The Priority Area Coordinators report that the Priority Area is progressing favourably and quite rapidly in the sense that all Actions and Flagship Projects are on a fast track. Priority Area 10 can demonstrate extensive progress in relation to improving the access to, and the efficiency and security of, energy in the Baltic Sea Region. On this basis, the PACs find it useful to consider how to best shape the future of the Priority Area to ensure that efforts remain targeted around the most urgent challenges.

Increased integration of the energy markets in the Baltic Sea Region will contribute to stability and economic growth, and improve the security of energy supply. It will reduce prices and facilitate the diversification of energy sources and enable the introduction of solidarity mechanisms. Therefore, the Strategic Action in Priority Area 10 focuses on establishing an integrated and well functioning market for energy by implementing the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan (BEMIP). BEMIP is also covered by three Flagship Projects under Priority Area 10.

To secure progress in Priority Area 10, the BEMIP High Level Group has agreed to act as the steering group. Contact between the Danish Embassy in Latvia and the Danish Energy Agency has been established in order to facilitate contact with relevant actors if necessary.

In relation to the future work of the Priority Area, the Coordinators anticipate some financial as well as technical challenges. The experience of the Priority Area Coordinators is that they are becoming more directly involved in the practical implementation of the Strategy’s Action Plan and there is thus an obvious need for a certain amount of Technical Assistance (TA) for supporting their activities. A Trust Fund is highlighted as one attractive option for channelling TA for PAC.

In the forthcoming period, the Priority Area Coordinators will, if TA and additional financial resources are made available, focus their work efforts on the two Cooperative Actions in relation to identifying new projects which are in line with the scope of Priority Area 10. Furthermore they will try to explore possible synergies in relation to cooperation with Priority Area 5.

Actions:

The coordinators point out that both the Strategic Action and the two Cooperative Actions are covered by the various Flagship Projects and proceeding well. Progress is described under the Flagship Projects. The coordinators note that if technical assistance funding and/or other financial resources become available, they will focus their future work more on the Cooperative Actions with respect to identifying new projects in line with the scope of the Priority Area.

Strategic actions:

  “Establish an integrated and well functioning market for energy by implementing the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan (BEMIP) which, in addition to infrastructure projects, includes specific steps to achieve the desired integrated and functioning internal market for energy. This should include better coordination of national energy strategies, and measures to promote diversity of supplies and better functioning of the energy market.

Report: Please see report for Flagship Projects 10.1, 10.2 and 10.4.

Cooperative actions:

  “Increase use of renewable energies" by extending the use of biomass, solar energy and wind power (e.g. the Nordwind II, project supported by the Nordic Council, and Krieger’s Flak), especially by research into demonstrations and deployments of on- and offshore wind and other marine renewable energy technologies. The region has high-level expertise in maritime technologies. This must be better utilised. In addition, the database on bioenergies developed by the Nordic Council of Ministers (NCM) should be fully exploited. (NB: This has to be read in conjunction with Priority Area number 5 ‘To adapt to climate change’).

Report: Please see report for Flagship Projects 10.2, 10.3 and 10.4.

  “Ensure more cross-border cooperation” to share experiences and coordinate better in fields such as electricity grid and maritime spatial planning, regulatory practices regarding interconnector investments, and environmental impact assessments of wind farms.

Report: Please see report for Flagship Projects 10.2 and 10.3.

Flagship Projects (as examples):

In the frame of the TEN-E and/or the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan (BEMIP) – and the relevant energy projects covered by the European Economic Recovery Plan – the following proposals are underlined:

  10.1. “Monitor the implementation of the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan (BEMIP) correspondingly with the actions of the High Level Group of the BEMIP”. In particular, priority should be given to “connect the Baltic States to the energy networks of the Region”. The need to monitor the progress of the BEMIP emerges not only from the BEMIP on its own, but also from the framework of the European Union Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region. The function of monitoring relies on the High Level Group of the BEMIP, therefore the aim of this project is better coordination between strategic goals of the European Union Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region and the BEMIP. The Commission and the Member States concerned have developed the BEMIP which identifies key missing infrastructures in electricity and gas, lists necessary actions (including financing), and provides coordination mechanisms to bring together Member States, market players and different financing sources. Innovative interconnector solutions involving ‘plugging in’ offshore renewable energy production installations are considered. Projects listed under the TEN-E guidelines could be co-financed by the TEN-E instruments, moreover the European Economic Recovery Plan provides for important additional financial support for infrastructure projects in the Region. (Lead: Lithuania; Deadline for the implementation of priority projects: to be determined) FAST TRACK

Report: This Flagship Project supports the Strategic Action 'Establish an integrated and well functioning market for energy' by implementing the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan (BEMIP), which, in addition to infrastructure projects, includes specific steps to achieve the desired integrated and functioning internal market for energy. This should include better coordination of national energy strategies, and measures to promote diversity of supplies and better functioning of the national energy strategies, as well as measures to promote diversity of supplies and better functioning of the energy market.

In terms of priorities, BEMIP’s focus was initially on the electricity sector, then gas, making reference to other topics of high importance (oil and clean energy). BEMIP brings together in a coordinated way the projects involving all Baltic Sea Region EU Member States, and as an observer Norway, for the development of: a) An internal market for electricity and gas; b) Electricity interconnections; c) New electricity generation capacity; d) Gas diversification of routes and sources; and e) Oil.

The state of play so far includes the following points:

• On electricity, work is progressing well and according to plan. A few actions are ahead of

schedule, such as the work launched by NordPoolSpot to create the "BEMIP price area".

In general, the start of the process can be regarded as a success: since the implementation of the first step of the roadmap, the process is now being driven forward by market actors. Support from the European Energy Programme for Recovery (EEPR) is still highlighted as a driver for project implementation: The Estlink2 investment decision has been made

ahead of plan.

• A major topic for discussion over the coming months is the definition of a common policy

between the three Baltic States on electricity imports from non-EEA countries.

• A new High Level taskforce on nuclear generation with members from the countries

concerned has been established in order to promote and support the implementation of the Visaginas regional nuclear power plant project, to look at related interconnections, as well

as to assess financing options for the project.

• The gas sector now also enjoys the heavy focus of the BEMIP work. A major

breakthrough in this area is the now ongoing dialogue between the companies concerned

on the PL-LT gas link which received political support from both sides.

• Several applications for TEN-E support were received by the Commission in 2010,

including the PL-LT gas link and a storage project in Latvia.

• The West Baltic taskforce [1] has been launched and successfully finished its mandate; it

delivered an action plan in December 2010 which was approved by the BEMIP High Level Group. The Baltic States have also agreed to implement an entry/exit model on a regional level as opposed to country by country (when their markets are open); the details

are currently being discussed.

• Discussions on a regional LNG project are also ongoing and much progress has been

achieved. Evaluation of the LNG options/locations based on agreed criteria is underway, but further discussions are still needed; a special High Level Group meeting was scheduled in addition to East-Baltic LNG taskforce meetings to make progress. A decision

should be reached in the coming months.

  10.2. “Demonstration of coordinated offshore wind farm connection solutions” (e.g. at Krieger's Flak (Denmark, Germany) and Södra Midsjöbanken (Sweden)) (Lead: Denmark; Deadline for progress review: to be determined) FAST TRACK

Report: The traditional way to connect offshore wind power plants is to use national, radial solutions. This project will develop and implement an innovative, cross-border solution which is based on the dual-purpose use of the subsea cables for both transmission of wind energy and energy trade. Hence the aim of this project is to ensure a modular-based Combined Grid Solution (CGS) for the grid connection of the offshore wind farms at Kriegers Flak area in the Baltic Sea. The purpose of this project is in other words to secure a joint interconnection solution for the German offshore wind farm EnBW Baltic 2 and the expected Danish offshore wind farm – Kriegers Flak III.

The result of this project may be the first offshore grid connection of offshore wind power which will also operate as an interconnector. When this large-scale project is completed, it will have addressed the technical challenges of designing, installing and operating a Combined Grid Solution based on the new multi-terminal HVDC voltage source converter (VSC) technology. The project will also have addressed a number of cross-border, regulatory challenges.

A Combined Grid Solution at Kriegers Flak will bring renewable energy to European consumers, strengthen the energy markets and increase the security of supply by providing transmission capacity.

Since the concept of the CGS project is based on the prerequisite that offshore wind farms will be built and operated in the Danish and German part of Kriegers Flak, the progress of these wind farm projects is essential for the progress of the CGS project. EnBW Baltic 1 has been designed, built and installed with a capacity of 48.3 MW in 2010. Concerning EnBW Baltic 2 (former Kriegers Flak I), the project owner (EnBW) has entered into a contract to build the platform for the offshore substation (OSS) with the option of an extension that will accommodate the additional cable connections for the Combined Grid Solution project. EnBW Baltic 2 will have an overall installed capacity of 288 MW.

The political decision concerning Kriegers Flak III on the Danish part has not yet been taken. As a consequence, the final technical design of the CGS project is therefore still pending. The project's main activities in the upcoming years are: Danish political decision on the offshore wind farm Kriegers Flak III, selection of the optimum technical solution and the permission processes.

  10.3. Implement the Baltic Sea Region Bioenergy Promotion project. The project aims at strengthening the development towards a sustainable, competitive and territorially integrated Baltic Sea Region in the field of sustainable use of bioenergy. (Lead: Sweden; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: The Flagship Project aims at strengthening the development towards a sustainable, competitive and territorially integrated Baltic Sea Region in the field of sustainable use of bioenergy. The project is intended to serve as a major Baltic Sea Region-wide platform for:

  • 1) 
    Cross-sectoral and transnational networking to facilitate information and knowledge exchange; 2) Coordinating policy development; 3) Designing the application instruments to promote bioenergy; 4) Creating a regional platform.

The Flagship Project is divided into different thematic work packages (WP), which are the focus for evaluating progress:

Within WP2 on Information and Dissemination, the aim is to increase the knowledge of the opportunities for bioenergy and to enable technology transfer between the BSR countries and regions. Achievements thus far include a project website ( www.bioenergypromotion.net ), a finalised Communication Plan, a database of bioenergy actors, and cooperation established with other EU funded projects, such as 4Biomass, Set@Work, RUBIRES, BATMAN and EEN. The final meeting and WP 2 conference will be held in Rostock, Germany in late October 2011.

Within WP3 – Policy, objectives include the common development and operationalisation of sustainability criteria for bioenergy, the demonstration of ways and good practices on how to integrate those criteria into the policy framework through certification systems and other policy instruments and support for the formulation and implementation of coherent strategies and action plans promoting sustainable use of biomass for heating, electricity and transport. Results include: i) (Draft) policy guidelines on sustainability criteria; ii) A list of national certification schemes, a policy assessment report, a questionnaire to identify capacity needs regarding NREAP formulation, and a first draft of EU policy assessment; iii) The first outline on certification systems, as well as the setting up of the structure of BSR country reports; and iv) The preparation of criteria for Good Practice and guidance for policy showcases – these criteria have been disseminated for partner feedback. Regarding the further work of the WP, the “Biomass for bioenergy state-of-the-art meeting” has for instance been planned, and may include potential cross-fertilisation with the UNECE process.

The WP 4 on (Sub)regions focuses on establishing regions as testing grounds, developing means for promoting bioenergy on a regional level, and establishing regional network points. Achievements thus far include network points and regional websites set up in dedicated regions and a regional business/industry assessment report. A final workshop for exchange of experiences on Strategic Management Plans will take place in Potsdam, Germany, on June 14-17, 2011.

Finally, WP5 – Business, aims at providing information to ensure sustainable, transparent business possibilities between BSR countries in the field of bioenergy, through comprehensive mapping of stakeholders, technologies and best practices in business development. It also looks to establish a BSR wide virtual broker platform for bioenergy business developments and to support bioenergy market “match-making” through the facilitation of opportunities to create networks, clusters, public-private partnerships and potential project development. The 4th progress report will be ready in June 2011.

  10.4. “Extend the ordic electricity market model ( ORDEL 25 )” to the three Baltic

States by following a step-by-step approach with a concrete timetable for implementation (market integration roadmap) within the framework of the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan (BEMIP). (Lead: Latvia; Deadline for progress review: to be

determined)

Report: In order to integrate the Baltic electricity sectors within the common EU electricity market, the Baltic electricity market design has to be consistent with the key elements of the Nordic market design. The necessary actions for creating a well functioning Baltic energy market and integration of the Baltic electricity market in the Nordic electricity market are identified in the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan (BEMIP). Deeper cooperation among authorities and market participants in the Baltic States is required to facilitate harmonisation of legal and regulatory environments in the most efficient way and in the shortest time possible. Creation of an open and functioning common Baltic electricity market is an essential precondition for the Baltic electricity market integration into the Nordic market through the Nord Pool Spot, and includes adopting Nord Pool principles.

The Baltic electricity market roadmap consists of four steps.

Step 1 (2009) – preliminary political and business decision-making on market integration

Step 2 (2010) – fulfilment of market opening requirements

Step 3 (2011-13) – market functioning fine-tuning

Step 4 (2013-15) – fully functioning market integrated with the Nordic market

Besides parallel development of the market infrastructure and interconnections, it will also ensure greater effectiveness of the markets.

In accordance with the BEMIP Action Plan, the creation of a fully functioning electricity market in the Baltic States and its integration within the Nord Pool Spot Price Area should be completed by the end of 2011. The Estlink Price Area and Lithuanian power exchange successfully opened in 2010. At the beginning of 2011, the Ministry of Economics of the Republic of Latvia prepared amendments to the Electricity Market Law which will soon be adopted by the Parliament. The draft Law defines the most important elements concerning the legal form and operation of power exchange, interprets the bidding area, defines forms of deals that can be done only within the power exchange, assigns the obligation for the electricity market operator to supervise electricity trade in the power exchange and obliges the power exchange participant, similarly to regulations in other European Union Member States, to sign a balancing agreement for trading in the power exchange.

At the moment, authorities of the Baltic States are preparing amendments to national legislation in order to carry out Transmission System Operators (TSO) ownership unbundling according to requirements of the 3rd Energy Package. All TSOs in the Region are involved in the process of drafting management’s rules and subsequent information provision to market participants. Latvia has chosen the independent system operator’s option as the TSO ownership unbundling model, which enables the vertically integrated undertaking to retain

25 NORDEL is the collaboration organisation of the Transmission System Operators (TSOs) of Denmark,

Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. Their mission is to promote the establishment of a seamless Nordic electricity market.

transmission system ownership. The Nord Pool Spot does not have experience to work with TSO organised in such a way. Therefore, business environment conformity assessment to Nord Pool Spot requirements could be extended. Further activities related to creation of the Baltic electricity market include Latvia and Lithuania joining the Estonian Nord Pool Spot market area in 2011. A fully functioning Baltic market integrated with the Nordic market is expected in 2015.

PA 11: To improve internal and external transport links Coordinated by Lithuania

and Sweden

A number of projects have being successfully implemented within the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region. One of the concrete examples is the Baltic Transport Outlook (BTO) 2030 study. The BTO report on traffic flows and scenarios 2016/2030 should be delivered in the first quarter of 2011, while the final report is expected in August 2011. Since the onset of the implementation phase, the Northern Dimension Partnership for Transport and Logistics (NDPTL) has also been developed. A new financial Annex to the NDPTL Secretariat Agreement was signed by the member countries during the high-level meeting in December 2010, thereby establishing the financial scheme for the years 2012 and 2013.

The PACs have identified the main priorities in the short term to be the revision of the TEN-T policy and the BTO 2030 study. The main priorities in the mid-term include fostering the cooperation of the Northern Dimension Transport and Logistics Partnership, fully using the potential of the development of Motorways of the Sea, and establishing Functional Airspace Blocks and projects to cooperate on smarter transport development. The PA's Strategic Action to complete the agreed priority transport infrastructures, given its heavy time and investments load, can be seen as the top long-term priority, which will constantly be under implementation.

The Coordination Group of the Priority Area has expressed the importance of promoting the EUSBSR at the national level and uniting various stakeholders to take part in the different EUSBSR projects.

Striving to embrace a more proactive role and to promote the implementation of the transport related agenda of the EUSBSR, the PACs organised the first Annual Progress Conference of the Baltic Sea Strategy’s Transport Priority Area No 11 on the 7th of December 2010 in Vilnius, Lithuania. The Conference gathered project leaders, authorities, regional organisations and the European Commission to discuss the progress of the Priority Area, challenges for the implementation of projects, and the overall status of the Baltic Sea Strategy. It is hoped that continuous dialogue on transport policy development and joint implementation of the transport infrastructure projects in the Baltic Sea Region will form a sound basis for improving the performance of the Region’s transport system.

The Ministers and High Level Representatives of the Baltic Sea Region signed the Haparanda Declaration on 17 June 2010, promising to commit to continued cooperation in the field of transport and infrastructure in order to contribute to improve the competitiveness of the Baltic Sea Region and the European Union. The meeting of NB8 Ministers for Transport on 21-22 September 2010 in Vilnius was organised in order to contribute to the TEN-T revision process. During the meeting, the NB8 Ministers for Transport signed a Common Statement on the TEN-T core network of the Baltic Sea Region. A common TEN-T core network of the Baltic Sea Region including German and Polish parts was composed, finalising the establishment of a full common TEN-T core network in the EUSBSR.

Actions:

The actions within Priority Area 11 are closely linked to the Flagship Projects, through which they will be implemented. Accordingly, this report considers the progress on the actions through the description below of the Flagships.

Strategic actions:

  “Coordinate national transport policies and infrastructure investments

o Regional cooperation should increase on transport issues, for example on the

interoperability of transport systems, icebreaking, co-modality, user charging schemes, transport Research and Development, application of new solutions, in particular in traffic management systems (air, road, rail, maritime), promotion of

joint actions (e.g. road safety) and sharing of best practices.

o The agreed TEN-T priority projects should be implemented on time (cf. further

under ‘Flagship Projects (as examples)’).

o The long-term transport development policies as well as the national investment

strategies should be coordinated to improve access to the Region and intraregional connections. In particular, the stakeholders of the Baltic Sea Region should agree on a joint position of the Region regarding changes which could be introduced in the framework of the TEN-T Policy review and the revision of the TEN-T

guidelines (joint proposal beyond national interests).

o The inland waterway and estuary navigation should be promoted (full

implementation of the ‘Naiades’ action plan 26 ) addressing existing infrastructural

bottlenecks in order to ensure optimal connections between the various regions of the Baltic Sea, such as the Oder Waterway (project E30) and connection of the

Oder River with the Vistula River (project E70).

o The stakeholders should jointly identify the infrastructure gaps which are

important for the whole region (e.g. on North-South and East-West axes) 27 . Links

to remote islands and the periphery (including air connections) should be

considered.

Report: See above

Cooperative actions:

  “Improve the connections with Russia and other neighbouring countries”, especially for major transport connections and freight transport logistics – through cooperation in the framework of the Northern Dimension policy (Northern Dimension Partnership on Transport and Logistics) and the EU–Russia Common Spaces. Special focus should be put

26 The NAIADES action programme, launched in 2006, comprises numerous actions and measures to boost

transport on inland waterways. The programme runs until 2013 and is to be implemented by the European

Commission, the Member States and the industry itself.

27 To support this, Sweden proposes to carry out, jointly with BSR countries, a study on the transport outlooks

for 2030. This study would describe the current transport flows used by all transport modes in the Baltic Sea

Region, infrastructure status, and bottlenecks, and take into account forecasts for 2030.

on removing non infrastructure-related bottlenecks, including those associated with border crossings. Member States should also explore options for new connections to the East and

Far East (gateway to Asia).

Report: See above

  “Facilitate efficient overall Baltic freight transport and logistics solutions 28 by

removing non infrastructure-related bottlenecks, promoting inter-modal connections, developing the Green Corridor concept through the implementation of concrete projects, developing infrastructure, supporting logistics service providers, establishing harmonised electronic administrative procedures, harmonising control procedures, etc. Timely implementation of the Rail Freight Corridors foreseen in the Regulation for a European rail network for competitive freight (EC Regulation 913/2010 i) will better connect freight nodes in the Baltic Sea Region to the broader rail freight network. The network will improve operations and impose strong cooperation between rail infrastructure managers on traffic management issues and investment, and in particular put in place a governance structure for each corridor. It foresees sufficient and reliable capacities allocated to freight on these corridors, the coordination between rail infrastructure management and goods terminal management, the definition of performance objectives such as punctuality and capacity and their monitoring, the coordination of works and easier access to and exchange of relevant information. This will contribute to attractive and efficient rail freight services within the Region and with other European regions, which is essential for

modal shift.

Report: See above

  “Increase the role of the Baltic Sea in the transport systems of the Region” through,

inter alia: identifying and implementing Motorways of the Sea 29 and Marco Polo actions;

developing ports and their adequate connections to the hinterland in particular by rail and inland waterways; increasing sea shipping competitiveness and efficiency through the prompt introduction of EU Maritime Transport Space without barriers and through the

gradual introduction of e-freight and e-maritime concepts; supporting safe, energyefficient and sustainable Short Sea Shipping and port operations.

Report: See above

  “Promote sustainable passenger and freight transport and facilitate the shift to intermodality”.

Report: See above

Flagship Projects (as examples):

  11.1. “Complete the agreed priority transport infrastructures”.

28 Global Satellite Navigation Systems (GNSS), such as Galileo, will contribute to the efficiency, safety and

optimisation of maritime, air and land transportation.

29 Motorways of the Sea that are already existing or new sea-based transport services that are integrated in doorto-door

logistic chains and concentrate flows of freight on viable, regular, frequent, high-quality and reliable

Short Sea Shipping links. The deployment of the Motorways of the Sea network should absorb a significant part of the expected increase in road freight traffic, improve the accessibility of peripheral and island regions and states and reduce road congestion.

In particular, the TEN-T Priority Projects such as: – Upgrading road, rail and maritime infrastructures in Sweden, Finland and Denmark on the Nordic Triangle multimodal corridor;

– Rail Baltica axis linking – by rail – Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia (as well as Finland through a rail-ferry service);

– Fehmarnbelt Fixed Link between Denmark and Germany with the access railways from Copenhagen and Hannover/Bremen via Hamburg;

– Railway axis Gdańsk-Warszawa-Brno/Bratislava-Wien;

– Motorway axis Gdańsk-Brno/Bratislava-Wien.

Options should also be considered to implement other important projects for the Region such as:

– The Bothnian Corridor (divided into the Swedish side and the Finnish side) which connects the Northern Axis to the Nordic Triangle and to Rail Baltica;

– Links with the Barents Region;

– Elements of the Northern Axis (East-West connections through the Baltic States and in the North of the Region);

– Via Baltica linking – by road – Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia;

– Multimodal (N-S) Transport Axes: from Scandinavia-Germany/Poland to the Adriatic Sea).

(Lead: all relevant countries; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: The TEN-T priority projects progressed well during 2010. For instance, intensive preparatory work resulted in the successful advancement of the Fehmarnbelt Fixed Link. Already in the first half of 2011, decisions on technical solutions (immersed tunnel or cablestayed bridge) were to be taken, with construction works expected to start in the first half of 2014. Concerning the Rail Baltica priority project, Lithuania started the construction of the European railway gauge on the Mockava-Šeštokai section in May 2010, aiming at full completion of this section in May 2011. Moreover, the Lithuanian Government adopted the Action Plan on the implementation of Rail Baltica in May 2010. The plan sets out a timetable of specific projects (preparatory work as well as construction work) to be carried out in order to deploy the European gauge up to Kaunas by 2014. Concerning the further completion of the project, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia jointly started a feasibility study with the purpose being to evaluate the construction of the Rail Baltica European gauge up to Tallinn (Estonia) in the long term.

The revision of the TEN-T policy is identified as the main short-term priority. Already in the second half of 2011, the discussion concerning the new legislation of the TEN-T guidelines will start. The discussion is both promising and challenging for the Baltic Sea Region, which has big territorial and infrastructural imbalances, making it difficult to find common criteria that would meet the needs of all countries.

To address these challenges and to contribute to the TEN-T revision process, the Ministers of Transport of the Nordic-Baltic 8 countries signed a Common Statement on the TEN-T core network of the BSR on 21 September 2010 in Trakai (Lithuania). The Ministers outlined that the methodology of the new TEN-T network should be flexible in order to reflect the different conditions of the countries, especially as concerns the need to have strong linkages with the EU neighbours. The Statement was later annexed by a common map of a TEN-T core network in the BSR, including the German and Polish parts, and was submitted to the European Commission as a contribution of the BSR Member States to the TEN-T revision.

  11.2. “Implement the orthern Dimension Partnership on Transport and Logistics”, including the related legal instruments. (Lead: Northern Dimension Partners; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: A Memorandum of Understanding establishing the Northern Dimension Partnership on Transport and Logistics (NDPTL) was signed in Naples on 21 October 2009. The next step is to establish a secretariat for the Partnership. After intensive work within the Steering Committee of the NDPTL, an agreement on the secretariat was prepared and signed in Zaragoza on 8 June 2010. The Secretariat will be supported by financial contributions from each participating country. It is envisaged that for 2011, the costs of the secretariat will be covered by voluntary contributions from Denmark, Finland, Germany, Norway and Sweden. Regarding the establishment of a financial scheme for 2012 and 2013, a new financial Annex to the NDPTL Secretariat Agreement was signed by the member countries at the High Level Meeting on 15 December 2010, whereby all the countries agreed to provide annual contributions, thus ensuring the financial stability of the secretariat and the partnership. At the moment, the process of recruiting staff to the Secretariat is ongoing.

The purpose of the Partnership is to improve the most important transport routes in the Region in order to support the region's growth. One of the tasks of the secretariat is to draft an Action Plan of Northern Dimension priority projects covering both infrastructure projects and horizontal measures. The Partnership has already achieved concrete results in its development process. The NORDIM study, initiated to assist and launch the NDPTL in a timely manner, was completed in December 2010. As an output of this study, a list of priority infrastructure projects of all member countries was identified.

The PACs note that the NDPTL is the most important regional instrument in the transport and logistics field for addressing the aims of the EUSBSR in relation to neighbouring countries. The above-mentioned Action Plan will set an agenda for further activities under this Flagship.

  11.3. “Develop the Baltic Motorways of the Seas network” – linking the Baltic Sea Member States with Member States in Central and Western Europe through sustainable transport links, including the route through the North Sea / Baltic Sea canal / Danish straits. The selected TEN-T and Marco Polo Motorways of the Sea corridors such as the high-quality rail and intermodal Nordic corridor Königslinie involving the Sassnitz Trelleborg link and the Baltic Sea area Motorways of the Sea involving the Karlshamm Klaipeda link, as well as the Karlskrona-Gdynia link, should be implemented, and further project ideas (including the Polish links) should be developed through regional cooperation. (Lead: The Baltic Motorways of the Sea Task Force; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: The Motorways of the Sea (MoS) concept is one of thirty priority projects for the Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T). Co-financing from the EU can be sought for studies and projects. Studies can be granted funds of up to 50% of the total costs, and investment which includes at least two EU countries is funded by up to 30%. The MoS concept aims in particular to strengthen cohesion and accessibility and to facilitate modal shift. In the Baltic Sea Region, the main emphasis is on cohesion and accessibility. A way to achieve these objectives is to concentrate cargo flows or to create long-term and frequent maritime transport between the EU countries and the outside world.

The Baltic Sea States have been active in making the MoS concept operational. A taskforce is established and consists of representatives from the EU countries in the Baltic Sea area, Norway and the European Commission. The development of the Motorways of the Sea concept in the Baltic is to be coordinated by the Baltic MoS Taskforce. The Taskforce has discussed the future work on the MoS concept, which is envisaged to encompass both corridor-specific infrastructure projects as well as projects of a more horizontal nature that are of wider benefit.

Initial action taken by the Baltic Sea States included a project in 2005-07 which included initial studies and joint horizontal activities with a view to developing the MoS concept in the Baltic Sea. This Master Plan Project, which had a total budget of just over €3.5 million, consisted of four parts: a study on flows of goods and infrastructure in the Baltic Sea Region, actions to improve winter navigation, a study on quality assurance of the priority fairway system in the Baltic Sea and a study on the development of a port hub function for transoceanic traffic on the Baltic Sea, a so-called North Sea Baltic hub.

In September 2006, the Baltic Sea countries requested operators in the transport sector to submit project proposals for MoS projects in the Baltic Sea Region. The end result of this call was that two MoS projects were granted in November 2008 total co-financing from the TEN- T MoS budget of around €15 million. The ports included in the projects were Karlshamn (SE)-Klaipeda (LT) and Trelleborg (SE)-Sassnitz (DE). In December 2009, it was decided to also grant TEN-T co-financing to the MoS project Baltic Link, including the ports Karlskrona (SE) and Gdynia (PL) with an EU contribution of about €17 million.

The project aims of the MoS project Karlshamn-Klaipeda are to improve infrastructure in the two ports and to support intermodality which will contribute to developing the transport corridor between Scandinavia and the Eastern Europe-Black Sea area.

The aim of the MoS project Königslinie is to improve the transport corridor between Sassnitz and Trelleborg by upgrading the capacities of a rail/sea link combined with the development of new intermodal train services. Within the project there is also the potential for a significant modal shift from road to combined rail-sea-rail transport. The Baltic Link project between Gdynia and Karlskrona aims to have a new combined terminal in Alvesta, upgraded railway between Emmaboda and Karlskrona, infrastructure investments in the two ports and investments in a new electrification system on ferry operator Stena Line’s new ferries on the Gdynia-Karlskrona route.

In November 2009, the Baltic MoS Taskforce opened an open call for corridor-specific MoS proposals in the Baltic Sea Region, which included horizontal projects. This resulted in December 2010 in three MoS projects being granted co-financing from the TEN-T MoS budget. The ports included were Gothenburg (SE)-Arhus (DK)-Tallinn (EE) with around €29 million, Gedser (DK)-Rostock (DE) with around €24 million, and the horizontal activity MONALISA involving Sweden, Denmark and Finland, receiving co-financing of around €11 million.

The main aim of the MoS project Rostock-Gedser is to improve efficiency and capacity on the ferry link and to increase the multimodal perspective, mainly by investments in port and ferry infrastructure. The MoS project between Gothenburg-Arhus-Tallinn is called The Baltic Sea Hub and Spokes Project and aims to facilitate a modal shift from road to sea by providing more efficient transport solutions and improving access to markets in Central and Northern Europe.

The MONALISA project is not in itself a Flagship Project within the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region, but it addresses strategic actions and two Flagship Projects of Priority Area 11 (Motorways of the Sea and Smarter Transport), in addition to addressing Priority Area 4 and Priority Area 13. The project's main aim is to improve safety of navigation in the Baltic Sea and serve different Motorways of the Sea links in that area.

  11.4. “Shorter plane routes” through the establishment of ‘Functional Airspace Blocks’ (FAB) in the Baltic Sea Region (i.e. the North European FAB, the Nordic Upper Area Control FAB and the Baltic FAB). The aim is to develop a cooperation system between countries in the Baltic Sea Region in order to ensure a successful and smooth transition from domestic air traffic management arrangements to a more integrated European dimension with 2012 as a deadline for implementation. (Lead: Poland and Lithuania; Deadline for progress review: to be determined) FAST TRACK

Report: The goal of this Flagship is to develop a cooperation system between countries in the Baltic Sea Region through the establishment of ‘Functional Airspace Blocks’ (FAB) in order to ensure a successful and smooth transition from domestic air traffic management arrangements to a more integrated European dimension.

The NEFAB: Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Latvia, Norway and Sweden are members of the North European Functional Airspace Block. A feasibility report on the establishment of the FAB was presented in January 2011. The National Supervisory Authorities will during spring 2011 perform an evaluation ahead of a state level agreement. Denmark and Sweden are of the opinion that the feasibility report shows too low a level of ambition regarding the integrated cooperation and have declared that they will keep to the DK-SE FAB if this ambition cannot increase to the level of performance scenario as described in the feasibility report.

The FAB between Sweden and Denmark: An Agreement between the National Supervisory Authorities was signed in July 2010. A Partnership Agreement between Naviair (Denmark) and LFV (Sweden) establishing the commonly owned NUAC Company to deliver en-route services in the Danish-Swedish FAB was signed on 14 October 2010.

The official DK/SE FAB notification from the Commission was received on 6 July 2010 and published in the official journal on 1 December 2010. The NUAC Company will deliver operational support from 2011. From 2012, the Company will operate three ATCCs and provide Air Navigation Services within Danish and Swedish airspace.

The Baltic FAB between Lithuania and Poland: The Ministries of Transport signed a Letter of Intent on cooperation with regard to the Baltic Functional Airspace Block Initiative in July 2010. By this Letter of Intent, the countries decided to cooperate in carrying out a Feasibility Study on the Polish and Lithuanian Functional Airspace Block. The study, financed by the Polish air navigation service provider PANSA and the European Commission, will analyse practical and technical aspects of the Baltic FAB. The study is to be finished during 2011.

The Parties also agreed upon and established several organisational and cooperation structures: a joint inter-ministerial Strategic Committee for the governance and steering of the Baltic FAB Initiative, a joint Steering Committee for the governance and steering of the progress of the Feasibility Study, and a Baltic FAB Project Team with respective Working Groups which are to prepare and submit concrete solutions and decisions in the main areas of the FAB Project.

It is expected that the Baltic FAB will become fully operational by the end of 2012. Lithuania and Poland have informed Mr. Siim Kallas, the Vice-President of the European Commission, about their intentions to cooperate in the development of the Baltic FAB Initiative, sending him a joint letter on this issue.

  11.5. “Cooperate for smarter transport” through development and implementation of concrete pilot initiatives which would contribute to improving safety and freight logistics efficiency, shifting freight from road to rail and sea, and minimising environmental impact of transport in the Region (e.g. the Green Corridor project from the ports of Sweden, Denmark and Germany to the ports of Lithuania and Kaliningrad, the Easy Way project in

the Baltic Sea Region 30 , the eco-driving project ECOWILL and road safety promotion

cooperation programmes). (Lead: Lithuania and Sweden; Deadline for progress review: to

be determined) FAST TRACK

Report: This Flagship is directed towards the development and implementation of concrete pilot initiatives which would contribute to improving safety and freight logistics efficiency, shifting freight from road to rail and sea, and minimising the environmental impact of transport in the Region. To a greater extent than other parts of Priority Area 11, this project represents novel ideas, initiatives and activities.

One of the most interesting parts of this Flagship concerns Green Corridors. The concept of Green Corridors originates from the European Commission’s Freight Transport Logistics Action Plan from 2007. In this Action Plan, the Member States were encouraged to take the initiative. Against this background, Sweden, following an initiative within the government's Logistics Forum in October 2008, started developing a project on Green Corridors.

The three transport projects TransBaltic, East West Transport Corridor II (EWTCII) and Scandria are very important in this context. They are co-funded by the Baltic Sea Region Programme 2007-13. All three projects will run for three years until the end of 2012. The projects have agreed on joint green transport corridor activities together with the Swedish Ministry of Enterprise, Energy and Communications. The purpose of the agreement is to specify the division of labour and harmonisation measures in tackling the green corridor concept among the undersigning parties through to the end of 2012.

One concrete responsibility for the Swedish Ministry is to strive to establish a Stakeholder’s Forum for transport and logistics in the Baltic Sea Region. The Forum shall be used by East West TC II, Scandria and TransBaltic as an advisory body. A first “open forum” meeting was held in Tallinn on 14 October 2010.

TransBaltic arranged during spring 2010 regional foresight debates in Vilnius, Stockholm, Bodö and St Petersburg. The time perspective was 2030. A foresight report summarising the ideas and discussions was presented in autumn 2010. EWTCII has two tasks of great importance and general interest also outside EWTCII: the green corridor manual and an information broker system. The work to develop a green corridor manual has now started and includes guidelines, key performance indicators and steering mechanisms. The work on the information broker system has also started. The Scandria project is focusing on optimisation measures such as time, energy and emission savings in infrastructure and logistics. Such

30 The Easy Way project, supported via the Trans-European Transport Network Programme, brings together 21

Member States, including several from the Baltic Sea Region, in order to cooperate on and to accelerate the deployment of intelligent transport systems on the Trans-European Road Network. It would be beneficial if the missing countries in this Region, namely Latvia, Estonia and Poland, joined this platform in the near future.

criteria will be tested and implemented during the creation of the Baltic-Adriatic Development Corridor. The first open conference was held in Berlin 15-16 September 2010. A Green Corridor Strategy will also be launched as part of the Scandria project.

In parallel with these projects, another important project began its work during 2010, the SuperGreen project. This is run by a consortium, with some partners coming from the Baltic Sea Region, and is co-financed within the 7th Framework Programme. The first open conference was held in Helsinki 28 June 2010. SuperGreen has selected nine corridors for benchmarking and testing of Key Performance Indicators. Green Corridors in the BSR are included in this selection. SuperGreen will also finish its work at the end of 2012.

Two additional corridor candidates have shown their interest in getting involved in the Green Corridor cooperation: the Rail Baltica Growth Corridor and the Bothnian Green Logistic Corridor.

2011 and 2012 will generally be of great importance for the development and initial implementation of the building blocks for the Green Corridors. A Green Corridor Demo Site is planned to be established in Gothenburg. The Swedish network for green corridors will arrange a Green Corridor Demo Day in September 2011.

The PACs foresee new project proposals as a result of Baltic Transport Outlook, for instance with respect to common infrastructure planning and investments. Also, the outcome of the current TEN-T revision could result in new proposals and projects. Relevant criteria for evaluating such new projects that seek to contribute to successful implementation of the EUSBSR need to be considered.

PA 12: To maintain and reinforce the attractiveness of the Coordinated

Baltic Sea Region in particular through education and youth, by

tourism, culture and health 1) Tourism:

Mecklenburg Vorpommern (Germany)

  • 2) 
    Health:

Northern

Dimension

Partnership in

Public Health

and Social

Well-being

  • 3) 
    Education and youth:

    Hamburg

Brief summary of overall progress:

Education

Education in the BSR should be seen in the context of the EU 2020 strategy where it is a transversal and underlying topic in all three pillars of smart growth, sustainable growth and inclusive growth. Education is the basis for developing economies, building innovation and learning about sustainability. In the context of demographic change and the shortage of a qualified workforce, education plays a particularly important role in increasing the number of highly qualified young professionals.

All EU Member States are aiming for the 2020 strategy’s targets, including the following education targets:

• The rate of early school leavers should be under 10%; • At least 40% of the younger generation should have a tertiary degree.

Education in the Baltic Sea Region is to be seen in the European context, i.e. respecting the full educational responsibilities of the Member States. Referring to the macro region of the Baltic Sea, education can and should strengthen what has always been the strength of the Region: A strong regional identity, the most innovative region of Europe, and a high economic potential.

In order to use the full potential in future, further develop the economy and overcome disparities in the Region, the Baltic Sea Region should see education as an underlying topic and further develop educational targets as set out in the EU 2020 strategy: enhancing the performance of education systems, facilitating the entry of young people to the labour market, and empowering people by developing their skills throughout the lifecycle.

There is no obligation for EU Member States to cooperate in education. All activities are voluntary and education is not an EU policy. This may explain why ministries and agencies are still not playing an active role in the Priority Area Education. The lesson to be learned from that is: 1) the macro-regional approach should be linked to the EU 2020 strategy as Member States are working on this (i.e. progress reports to the European Commission); and 2) the PAC has to undertake research to identify colleagues in charge and with knowledge of the issue. Once identified, these people need to be motivated to take part in the activities of the macro-regional strategy; this uses up a lot of PAC time resources. It would be much better if ministerial colleagues came to participate in a proactive way.

Since autumn 2010, the process of clarifying the Flagship Projects (FP) to be put into the Action Plan has continued. The main objective was and is: 1) to find out whether Flagship Projects included in the Action plan really function; and 2) to include Flagship Projects representing areas of the educational and lifelong system which are not yet present in the Action Plan.

A second strand of activities in the PA was, together with the Flagship Project Leaders, to define the function of the steering group, in terms of communication, and the roles of PAC and FP leaders.

The Flagship Projects included in the PA are still changing: through the last amendment of the Action Plan, a new FP has been integrated following a proposal from the PAC: the “Baltic Training Programme – BTP” which includes an area of further vocational training for young adults covering the topic of entrepreneurship. Here, the Norden Association is the FPL and has taken over a very active role in the steering group. One of the two Youth projects has been taken out as no FP leadership could be found. However, another Youth project led by the Blekinge Region is under preparation and will work on mentorship and entrepreneurship; this one should be included in the Action Plan and become a FP. The FP “Mobility of students and researchers in the BSR” has been stopped by both project lead partners (Federal Ministry of Education and Research in Germany, Ministry of Science in Denmark). It held a final conference in cooperation with the Baltic Development Forum (BDF) and the Nordic Council of Ministers on 23 November 2010 in Copenhagen. A final paper was promised to be written, but so far, nothing has been delivered, except a first draft. The PAC agreed with the BDF to cooperate on the “Fifth Freedom” in order to focus more on this topic.

The FP “BSR Quick” is currently preparing another project proposal under the Baltic Sea Region Programme. This new project will be a spin-off and address the development of female entrepreneurs and the elderly workforce.

During the last meeting of the steering group (with PACs, FPLs, NCPs and the Commission) in January 2011, a definition of roles and tasks of PACs, FPLs and NCPs was developed and discussed.

In order to increase visibility, there are plans to set up a PA website. The use of a share point will be examined in order to increase communication within the PA between meetings. With the future technical assistance support, the PAC plans to organise meetings at ministerial level in all countries where no contact exists at present.

Mid-term and long-term aims and objectives for education in the BSR are as follows: make cooperation more binding at ministerial level, set up a strategy working group at ministerial level from all EUSBSR states, put together examples of best practice and experiences, undertake a survey with the aim of identifying major common fields of development in the educational sector, and set up a catalogue of impulses for the development of educational systems.

Priority fields of educational development could be: implement the dual system of vocational training (including the active role of the private sector); implement the dual system of bachelor studies (including the active role of the private sector); implement good practice in early childhood education; further develop diploma recognition (through EQR, etc.); compare systems of monitoring and benchmarking; foster mobility; support teacher training; and provide education in sustainable development.

Tourism

The involvement of stakeholders in the implementation process is developing steadily. Currently, about 60 stakeholders have registered their interest in PA Tourism via the PA Tourism homepage, representing local and regional authorities, universities, projects and marketing organisations. Most of them are involved in local or sub-regional activities. As to direct input and feedback from the stakeholder side, direct contact with various EU projects like BaltMetPromo, Parks&Benefits or Baltic Museums 2.0 and direct interaction during events plays an important role. PA Tourism was presented at several events.

The establishment of a governance structure for cooperation in the tourism sector in the BSR is underway but it might need some 2-3 years until it becomes fully effective. In this respect, the funding of structures and activities also plays a crucial role.

Project proposals have been submitted to the INTERREG IV B South Baltic-Programme and Baltic Sea Region Programme, as well as to the Finnish ERDF programme (cf. Flagship Projects’ reports hereunder).

Initial preliminary results are now available. An analysis carried out in FP 12.9 of tourismrelated EU projects indicates the existence of about 82 projects, most of them taking place under the umbrella of the INTERREG IV A Programmes. In principle, most of these projects are in line with the objectives of PA Tourism and also those of the Baltic Sea Tourism Forum (BSTF) which indicates a high potential of synergies in the cooperation.

Because of the involvement of the PAC and the FPLs, the objective of developing tourism cooperation at BSR level has become more visible. Nonetheless, the objective as such is not as self-evident to all the stakeholders as one might expect.

Based on current actions, contacts with tourism stakeholders will be further developed. Further meetings with stakeholders are expected to take place in the course of the year. These meetings shall be held in different parts of the BSR, where possible with the support of the INTERREG IV A Joint Technical Secretariat. The target groups are national tourism ministries, tourism-related projects, local and regional tourism marketing organisations and other public authorities.

The involvement of third-country stakeholders, especially from Russia, was on the agenda of the follow-up “Turku Round Table” held on 27 May 2011 in St. Petersburg.

Towards the end of 2011, a stakeholder conference for PA Tourism is planned in which progress will be presented and the next steps discussed.

Health

The NDPHS has a framework, expertise and political support for fostering the implementation of the health area of the EUSBSR. The NDPHS Strategy correlates with the EUSBSR, to ensure that the health and social well-being related activities in the Northern Dimension area be implemented in a coordinated and efficient way and involve all relevant actors. Furthermore, the NDPHS presents an example of pragmatic and successful collaboration between the EU and non-EU countries within a jointly created framework, which contributes to fostering the objectives of the health component of the EUSBSR. During the period under review the NDPHS was able to successfully pursue the implementation of the planned goals, although limited financial resources continue to postpone the achievement of more ambitious plans.

Examples of the recent tangible achievements towards the implementation of the health area of the EUSBSR include the following:

• Fostering macro-regional cooperation in health and making it more integrated and

inclusive: The Partnership successfully approached several key regional stakeholders to involve them in the implementation of the EUSBSR. Among the involved key regional stakeholders is the Baltic Sea Parliamentary Conference (BSPC) for cooperation, inter alia, in the field of reducing hazardous and harmful use of alcohol. The cooperation continued between the NDPHS and the e-Health for Regions

network, the latter having been engaged by the NDPHS to take the lead role for the ehealth component of the EUSBSR Action Plan. Finally, several other regional frameworks for cooperation have been contacted for cooperation, among them the BioCon Valley and the ScanBalt BioRegion, both of which are involved in the development and implementation of the Flagship Project “Set up cross-sectoral reference projects for innovation in health and life sciences”.

• Providing assistance in identifying potential sources of financing for activities

contributing to the implementation of the EUSBSR: The Partnership co-organised a seminar with the INTERACT Point Turku on project development and funding. The participating financing institutions and EU programmes presented their funding programmes and the financial resources available for projects in the field of health and social well-being – 18 different financing programmes were presented in 11

presentations made during the event.

• Fostering macro-regional cooperation in policy-shaping: When discussing the next EU

financial programming period, the participants in the above-mentioned seminar agreed that there was a need to raise the profile of health and social well-being and to ensure that it would be visibly exposed in the list of funding programmes’ priorities. The NDPHS, supported by other relevant regional stakeholders, plans to take a role in

pushing for a change in this regard.

• Development/facilitation of regional Flagship Projects contributing to the

implementation of the EUSBSR: Most of the NDPHS expert-level structures embarked on the development of regional Flagship Projects, among them: (i) the EUSBSR Flagship Project on alcohol and drug prevention among youth; (ii) two projects son improving the services for vulnerable groups in order to prevent HIV; (iii) a project on nutrition, physical activity and prevention of obesity and diabetes in schoolchildren; and (iv) a project on health policy and strategy support to combat the non-communicable diseases epidemic in the Northern Dimension geographical area,

etc.

Regarding the challenges and future steps, it is important to note that the NDPHS is well equipped for a focused, coordinated and sustainable implementation of the health component of the EUSBSR. At the same time, project financing availability remains a critical issue in the implementation process. As to the immediate steps to take, these include, but are not limited to the following: (i) further efforts will be make to involve other relevant regional stakeholders in the implementation of the EUSBSR; and (ii) Flagship Project applications will be finalised and submitted to financing institutions and programmes. Limited international and national funding for project development, applications and implementation is a challenge, especially in the area of health and social well-being, which is “under-invested” compared to other sectors. The NDPHS believes that engaging EUSBSR Priority Area Coordinators in the development of the Baltic Sea Region programmes’ priorities could help ensure better alignment of funding for the implementation of the EUSBSR Action Plan.

Actions:

Cooperative actions:

  Education: “Further increase exchanges within the Baltic Sea Region” for students at schools, colleges, vocational institutions and adult education organisations under programmes from the European Union, from international organisations (such as the Nordic Council of Ministers) and from national / regional / local authorities. This could equally be extended to entrepreneurs and other professionals.

Report: The topics of this action are included in the Flagship Projects 12.1, 12.2, 12.4 and 12.5 that are described below and that are making it concrete.

Education: “Develop people-to-people actions” to reinforce the daily cooperation between citizens. For example, school exchanges to improve mutual understanding and promote language learning should be increased.

Report: The Norden Association already has the opportunity of supporting the people-topeople-actions, as they have a strong network of schools. Flagship Project 12.4 illustrates this action.

  Tourism: “Highlight and optimise the sustainable tourism potential” of the Baltic Sea Region by establishing an environmentally-friendly tourism strategy at the level of the Baltic Sea Region (including Russia). This strategy could include the harmonisation of standards, the development of similar projects in different regions, joint marketing of the Region and cooperation on projects.

Report: The objective of this action is to highlight and optimise the sustainable tourism potential by establishing an environmentally-friendly tourism strategy for the BSR, including Russia. The development of a strategy for the Region and a manual for sustainable tourism are on the agenda of FP 12.10. The results shall be confirmed by a PA Tourism stakeholder conference at the end of 2011. As to the involvement of Russia, tourism is not on the list of common interest that is currently being talked about by the Russian government and the European Commission. Nonetheless, Russian involvement is pursued on a regional basis. Additionally, contact with the Northern Dimension Partnership on Culture will be established.

  Tourism: “ etwork and cluster stakeholders of the tourism industry and tourism education bodies” based on the ongoing activities started with the first Baltic Sea Tourism Summit in October 2008. At the second Baltic Sea Tourism Forum in Vilnius in September 2009, it was decided to continue this process on an annual basis, with the next forum being hosted by the Kaliningrad Region in autumn 2010. Six future fields of intensified cooperation, among them common promotional activities, the creation of a common internet platform and the development of Baltic Sea Region products and services have been agreed on.

Report: According to this action, aspects to be mentioned in the strategy are joint marketing of the Region and cooperation on similar projects. The mapping exercises and the building-up of a network, especially in FP 12.7 and 12. 9, are a first step to identifying the different actors and their objectives. In the next step, the common denominators of the various activities will have to be identified. Next to that, issues like common marketing for the BSR are also being discussed in the Baltic Sea Tourism Forum and individual projects like BaltMetPromo involving the Baltic Development Forum. Through continuous dialogue, these issues will be further elaborated on.

The aforementioned activities also relate to the second cooperative action targets which are the development of networks and clusters of stakeholders in the tourism industry and tourism education bodies in the BSR. Reference is being made in the Action Plan to the “Baltic Sea Tourism Forum”. One result of the Kaliningrad Forum in November 2010 is a draft action plan which targets the joint development of products and services and their marketing in the fields of cultural and nature tourism, maritime tourism, events, and wellness and healthrelated tourism. The PAC accompanies these activities. Next to that, FPL 12.7 and 12.8 are also directly involved in the organisation of the work of the BSTF which promotes close cooperation with PA Tourism. The objective of this action is also supported by the activities in FP 12.8 which aims at setting up a tourism network. The result of these activities will be strongly influenced by the outcome of the project application of FPL 12.8 in the INTERREG IV B Baltic Sea Region Programme in spring 2011.

As the implementation of both cooperative actions is related to the Flagship Projects 12.7, 12.9 and 12.10, they will be finished only after 2012.

  Health: “Contain the spread of HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis” through partnerships and international collaboration in prompt and quality care for all, focusing on Tuberculosis / HIV co-infection and ensuring early diagnosis of HIV infections, providing access to treatment and strengthening interventions to reduce vulnerability, especially for Injecting Drug Users (IDU), prisoners, etc

Report: The NDPHS is developing two project proposals to strengthen inter-sectoral collaboration in HIV and related diseases prevention and care for vulnerable groups, with participation of partners from Russia, Poland, Lithuania and Finland. Both projects will aim at improving services for vulnerable groups in order to prevent HIV – one project is targeted at drug users and the other at primary prevention among youth. Concept Notes of both projects have been submitted to the Delegation of the European Union to the Russian Federation for financing from the Non-State Actors and Local Authorities Programme for the Baltic Sea Region. A project planning meeting was scheduled for April-May 2011.

  Health: “Fight health inequalities through the improvement of primary healthcare” by assessing differences in the accessibility and quality of primary health care in the Region, by reviewing the situation of patients and health professionals, including their deployment, mobility and training and by promoting e-health technology as a means for closing gaps in health care access and quality.

Report: The NDPHS continued its focus on identifying and addressing the key problems related to the improvement of the primary health care in the Region. The role of the local hospitals has been identified among the priorities for regional action. Local hospitals, being an interface between specialist medicine and primary health care, could serve as important components of a comprehensive and equitable health system. At the same time, rapid knowledge expansion and specialisation, coupled with increasing population demands for health care sophistication and the effects of financial austerity, may threaten local structures that do not adapt rapidly enough to the changing environment. Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Russia, Sweden and Norway have already expressed their interest in regional cooperation in addressing the issue. The first kick-off meeting was scheduled for May 2011 in Riga, followed by a seminar in autumn 2011, where possible development of a Flagship Project could be further discussed.

  Health: “Prevent lifestyle-related, non-communicable diseases and ensure good social and work environments” by developing comprehensive policies and actions in the entire region to prevent and minimise harm from tobacco smoking, alcohol and drug use to individuals, families and society (especially young people). Actions will contribute to the implementation of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and the “Northern

Dimension Partnership in Public Health and Social Well-being (NDPHS) 31 Strategy on

Health at Work” ensuring good social and work environments and preventing lifestylerelated, non-communicable diseases, using the workplace as an effective arena for promoting a healthy lifestyle.

Report: Several steps were taken towards strengthening the commitment and involvement of decision-makers and policy-makers in the prevention of lifestyle-related, non-communicable diseases (NCD) and ensuring good social and work environments in the Baltic Sea Region. Different NDPHS contributions have provided a basis for discussions on this issue. Another example of such activities is the established and evolving cooperation with the BSPC. In addition, major progress has been reported by the Member States in the implementation of the NDPHS “Health at Work” strategy, a merger of the ILO, WHO and EU occupational safety and health (OSH) strategies, committing the countries to improve OSH systems and improve the working environment, as part of the general health system. According to the informal surveys conducted during the BSN Annual Meeting, substantial progress has been achieved. Estonia, Finland, Germany Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Poland, Russia and Sweden reported that work is in progress or partly ready for all or almost all items of the NDPHS Strategy on Health at Work.

Furthermore, the NDPHS is developing several project proposals to prevent lifestyle-related NCDs and ensure good social and work environments. A Concept Note of the “Healthier and Wealthier Cities and Villages: Management of change through monitoring, partnership, promotion and commitment” project has been submitted to the Delegation of the European

31 The Northern Dimension Partnership in Public Health and Social Well-being (NDPHS) is a cooperative effort

of thirteen governments, the European Commission and eight international organisations. It provides a forum for concerted action to tackle challenges of health and social well-being in the Northern Dimension area and foremost in north-west Russia.

Union to the Russian Federation for financing from the Non-State Actors and Local Authorities Programme for the Baltic Sea Region. A project proposal “Nutrition, Physical Activity and Prevention of Obesity and Diabetes in Schoolchildren” and a project proposal “Stop NCD-epidemic now!: Health policy and strategy support to combat NCD epidemic in Northern Dimension geographical area” were discussed at the first planning workshop in St. Petersburg, Russia on 23-24 March 2011. Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Finland, Poland and Russia have expressed their interest in participating in the abovementioned two projects. In addition, the NDPHS is developing other new multi-country project proposals that will focus on industrial sectors and targets with high-risk working conditions, as well as return to work following work disability.

Among the challenges in preventing lifestyle-related NCDs and ensuring good social and work environments in the Baltic Sea Region is the fact that these issues are often given a low priority among the decision-makers. For example, there is a clear difference between the increasing availability and affordability of alcohol beverages in many countries and those countries’ capability and capacity to meet the additional public health burden that follows. This problem needs to get more attention from the policy-makers and decision-makers in order to reduce the spread of harmful drinking practices, which are among the main causes of the NCDs.

   “Bring local authorities close to the citizens” by developing tools (for example based on the LEADER approach) whereby citizens would see their concerns and interests addressed by local authorities.

Report: no report available.

Flagship Projects (as examples):

  12.1. Education: “Enhance cooperation – on a voluntary basis – between the regional Universities of the Baltic Sea Region” so that they coordinate their activities (research areas, exchange of students / professors / researchers, cooperation with enterprises) in order to establish the Baltic Sea Region as a region of sustainable development. This cooperation should implement political decisions devoted to Education for Sustainable Development. It could be based on the existing networks of universities, such as the

‘Baltic University Programme 32 ’ involving almost all universities in the Region, and the ‘Baltic Sea Region University Network 33 ’ with 40 members. A model could be the UHI Millennium Institute 34 . The envisaged Northern Dimension Institute which is under

preparation by a number of universities in the Region could also provide further opportunities for networking. (Lead: Baltic University Programme in coordination with Lithuania (Vilnius University); Deadline for finalisation: to be determined) FAST

TRACK

Report: Regional cooperation between universities is quite intensive. The Baltic University Programme (BUP) has been functioning since 1991. This Programme is coordinated by BUP at Uppsala University (Sweden). It unites 227 universities from 14 countries. The programme focuses on SD and ESD: university courses, university teacher training, student activities,

32 http://www.balticuniv.uu.se/

33 http://bsrun.utu.fi/

34 The UHI Millenium Institute is a partnership of colleges and learning and research centres, working together

to provide university-level education to people throughout the Highlands and Islands of Scotland.

research activities, exchange of students, common projects, etc. A third BUP Rectors conference will be held in October 2011.

About 40 universities cooperate in the Baltic Sea Region University Network (BSRUN), which started in 2000. The network organises conferences, the exchange of students and staff members, as well as common research projects. Dissemination of information is one of the main activities of the network. The secretariat is located at Turku University (Finland) and is mostly financed by the Finnish government.

The project leader has faced difficulties in securing financing for the Flagship Project and in finding relevant financiers that are interested in financing ESD and networking, and is trying to find possible financiers and contacting them for discussions.

Further cooperation of universities can be strengthened by:

  • making financing available for networking between universities in the Region;
  • coordination of university teacher training and research activities for the sustainable development of the Region;
  • cooperation for common, higher education areas in the Region;
  • benchmarking of the governance of universities;
  • cooperation among citizens in the Region with a view to preserving and cherishing linguistic and cultural diversity;
  • production and updating of courses.

There are no dates set for finalisation of such cooperation. Universities should agree on common indicators to ensure monitoring of the process.

  12.2. Education: "BSR-Quick”. The project BSR-Quick aims at qualification for owners, graduates and employees of small and medium-sized enterprises. The project encompasses academic education (dual bachelor study courses) and vocational training. By creating a network of universities, the missing link between SMEs and the academic area will be forged. In addition to education and training, the project will deliver innovative solutions for individual companies (Lead: Hanse Parliament e.V. Hamburg, Germany, with 40 partners from all BSR countries including business organisations, universities and polytechnics, and public administrations. Deadline for finalisation: December 2012).

Report: Besides the formal partners, the project strongly cooperates with nine Russian partners from St. Petersburg and Kaliningrad and has substantial support from 41 associated organisations.

A unique network of universities entitled the “Baltic Sea Academy”, providing the missing link between SMEs and academic institutions, was established at the beginning of the project in 2010 and has grown from 8 to 15 members since. The concrete work focuses on education, qualification and very tangible R&D solutions for SMEs. The trainings and study courses developed are very well accepted by the entrepreneurs and often overbooked. Following a “Hanseatic Conference” on Education, a book with perspectives from different countries in the Region will be published in May 2011. The publication will also include strategies for a future education policy.

As a spin-off, a new project was initiated in spring 2011 and is directed specifically at the further qualification and promotion of female entrepreneurs as well as the integration of older employees.

 The project will be finalised in December 2012.

  12.3. Education: “Identify barriers hampering mobility of researchers and students in the Baltic Sea Region and enhance cooperation in the Region in the area of mobility” (the so-called "Fifth Freedom"). (Lead: Denmark, Lithuania and Germany; Deadline for finalisation: to be determined)

Report: No report has been delivered so far.

  12.4. Education: “Promote school exchanges and develop a ring of partner schools around the Baltic Sea” in order to improve mutual understanding and promote language training. (Lead: Hamburg (in cooperation with the German Foreign Office); Deadline for finalisation: to be determined)

Report: While developing a ring of partner schools around the Baltic Sea, the following subjects should be dealt with and the following activities should be furthered:

– The number of exchanges between schools as well as between vocational institutions within the Baltic Sea Region should increase;

– The existing cooperation between schools should be encouraged and strengthened, e.g. by suggesting the schools deal with subjects of mutual interest as a basis of the cooperation;

– Language learning should be promoted.

It has not been possible so far to take stock of all existing school partnerships within the Baltic Sea Region. Hardly any country carries out surveys in order to gather data on school partnerships.

Lists of COMENIUS projects are available, but these connections exist only on a temporary basis and do not initiate long-term partnerships in the first place (perhaps now and then as a by-product).

If we have no data of the relevant schools, we are unable to proceed much further. We will have to narrow the scope of our work to a small number of countries within the Baltic Sea Region.

Thus the project leader decided to invite German actors in order to find a solution for this problem, to plan the next steps and to distribute the tasks. But there is a certain reluctance to participate in these actions because they lack financial support.

Without any reliable financial support it will be difficult to proceed.

In order to develop more than a website, money will be needed e.g. for initiating meetings of the schools involved and for sponsoring activities that they plan.

A meeting of the German actors was scheduled for April 2011. After having agreed on the scope of our activities, the project leader will try to find schools in this limited area that are interested in a school partnership with another school within the Baltic Sea Region.

A website with the relevant data will then be created.

Counselling and support will be offered to the schools that look for a suitable partner school.

  12.5. Education: "Baltic Training Programme" (BTP). The project BTP supports the internationalisation of vocational education and training (VET) as well as cross-border entrepreneurship. It is divided into two parts: 1) a testing model, where students at VET and their cooperation project ideas are matched with host companies in another country; and 2) seven stakeholder seminars for target groups such as providers of VET, companies, politicians and civil servants involved in VET. The seminars discuss relevant topics in order to identify actions needed to support internationalisation of VET and cross-border entrepreneurship in the BSR. The area of operations is Estonia, Latvia and the Eastern part of Sweden. (Lead: Norden Association, Sweden; Deadline for finalisation: May 2012).

Report: The project was launched in October 2009 with the main financing from INTERREG IVA Central Baltic. The partnership consists of four partners in Estonia, Latvia and Sweden with the Norden Association in Sweden as Lead Partner.

The method applied is built on matchmaking of viable business projects formulated by final year students at VET with host companies in a neighbouring country. Afterwards, the students participate in a combined educational and internship programme over one month. Project coaching by business consultants is offered to the participants, both students and companies. At the end of the programme, the projects are presented at seminars with stakeholders such as representatives from the industry, educational providers, politicians, etc. So far, two groups have been finalised from a total of 23 business projects.

The main challenge identified during the implementation of the project was the limited number of potential participants, namely students with an entrepreneurial mind and good command of English. Secondly, the educational providers have not proved to be very flexible as regards letting their students participate in the BTP outside the planned periods for internships. The challenges are being met with more direct information to the educational providers, building up a net of antennas supporting the project locally at the schools.

The next steps are three more groups, four seminars with stakeholders and finally a conference in Riga in April 2012. The BTP will be finalised in May 2012.

  12.6. Education and Youth: “Establish a youth resource centre”. The Youth Resource Centre in the Baltic States is to be built on the model of Youth Centers in Budapest and Strasbourg, but having a stronger focus on building competences within the field of organisational work and being built for and with young people. The target group of users will be the Baltic Sea Youth Councils and other youth organisations, then extending to include Belarus, Ukraine, Moldova, Russia and potentially the Caucasus. The activities of the centre should be coordinated with the Youth Resource Centre for Eastern Europe and the Caucasus, based in Warsaw, Poland. The centre is to represent a focal point for national and international cooperation between – and development of – different NGOs, and it should provide a venue with good working conditions and possible accommodation. (Lead: Lithuanian Youth Council (LiJOT), in cooperation with the national youth councils of Latvia, Estonia, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Denmark, Germany, Poland, Russia and Belarus; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: No report has been delivered.

12.7. Tourism: “Attract tourists to rural areas especially the coastal ones” by promoting joint sustainable rural and coastal tourism packages (e.g. farm, food tourism, hiking, winter sports, nature-based tourism) and by creating a tourism network made up of actors from the tourism sector, research and education, and local and the public sector, in order to share and disseminate best practices and know-how with regard to products, services and their accessibility. (Lead: Regional Council of Southwest Finland (in cooperation with Turku Touring); Deadline for progress review: 31 May 2012)

Report: About 40 people participated in the first kick-off meeting in Turku in September 2010 where different aspects of rural and coastal tourism were discussed, accompanied by some networking activity. During autumn, other national networking events were organised. Furthermore, the FPL participated in many Baltic Sea tourism related events and promoted the FP. The mapping of the regional tourism actors of the Baltic Sea Region has started and the formation of a Baltic Sea coastal and rural tourism network has been initiated. About 50 participants have signed up for the network.

Because of its limited resources, the lead partner is seeking new funds for the implementation. The lead partner has had to cover many of the costs of the Flagship from its own sources, namely the annual budget of the organisation. The involvement of the network members and stakeholders is challenging in terms of the lack of funding. The FPL (here: Centre of Expertise for Tourism and Experience Management at Turku Touring) prepared a project application for the 4th Call under the INTERREG IV B Baltic Sea Region Programme that closed at the end of March 2011. The application was coordinated by Turku Science Park. The objective of the proposed project is to set up an Innovation network for the BSR area, piloting tourism, which will strongly support the goals of the FP. The approval of the project would greatly support and speed up the implementation of the FP. The decision will be taken in October 2011.

Many workshops and seminars will be organised throughout the year. During autumn, a national rural tourism seminar will be organised together with the Finnish rural tourism theme group. The FPL will also be involved in a series of meetings around the BSR planned by the PAC. Exchange with the stakeholders in the coastal and rural tourism network will be further deepened with the aim of setting up a draft agenda for development needs and ideas for the promotion of joint tourism packages, though a lot will depend on the outcome of the project application in the INTERREG IV B BSR Programme. A progress review was submitted in June 2011 to the PAC.

12.8. Tourism: “Facilitate environmentally sustainable cruise vessels in the Baltic Sea” by developing programmes bringing together providers of maritime services to passengers (e.g. the cruise industry, maritime leisure activities, national/regional/local authorities…). (Lead: AIDA Cruises, Germany; Deadline for progress review: December 2012)

Report: Currently, no activities under this FP can be reported. AIDA CRUISES, a German cruise ship operator, is in contact with the PAC with regard to taking over the role of the FPL. One important point has been the question of resources that are needed to carry out this task which is apparently difficult for private company stakeholders. So far, no concrete activities have been undertaken in this FP.

12.9. Tourism and culture: “Promote the cultural and natural heritage” by mapping the main areas of interest in order to preserve and revitalise elements of cultural and natural heritage. Major directions in the further development of attractive and characteristic tourist offers in the Baltic Sea Region will be identified. (Lead: Office of the Marshal of the Pomorskie Voivodeship; Deadline for progress review: 31 December 2011) FAST TRACK

Report: A study on projects of initiatives and projects that relate to this FP finished in December 2010. This multilevel analysis identifies 82 projects that are being implemented within 12 INTERREG IV A programmes. Quite a lot of the projects analysed are concurrent with principles of the Strategy. The concurrence is, in many cases, "passive", because the projects are oriented in accordance with priorities of the programmes, not the Strategy. At the same time, in many cases a lack of a broader attitude to the strategy subject is visible, especially in the case of projects oriented towards investments.

The report will be given to the stakeholders/institutions responsible for tourist promotion and development as a source of current and reliable information about initiatives undertaken. Pursuant to the analysis conducted, conclusions and recommendations concerning directions of the Strategy implementation were prepared, and suggested directions for further cooperation between entities implementing particular projects were also indicated. The second step and challenge will be to establish cooperation structures with regard to cultural und natural heritage tourism in the BSR and to define the most suitable tools and methods for implementation.

So far, the FPL has not received any external funding for its activities. A project application in the INTERREG IV A South Baltic Programme has been re-submitted under the 5th call of this programme, with a decision expected in mid-April 2011.The prospect of obtaining funds within the INTERREG IV A South Baltic Programme will give real opportunities for crossborder cooperation with tourist product creations and implementations.

A progress review will be submitted at the end of 2011.

12.10. Tourism: “Develop strategies for sustainable tourism” by using available sources of

information such as the YEPAT database 35 or the Nordic Culture Point. In addition, within the project AGORA 2.0 36 , partners from the Baltic Sea Region (including Belarus) will start

implementing pilot projects to improve accessibility to natural, cultural and historical heritage for tourism and to detect features of a common identity of the Baltic Sea Region. (Lead: University of Greifswald (Germany); Deadline for progress review: 31 December 2011)

Report: The project AGORA 2.0 held its 2nd project meeting in Minsk / Belarus (October 2010) and is preparing the 3rd meeting in Tallinn / Estonia where draft solutions will be introduced, including:

– BASTIS (web-based Baltic Sea Heritage Tourism Information System)

– Heritage Scout (web-based heritage panel)

– BSR-wide online questionnaire survey: What do we have in common across the Baltic Sea Region?

– BSR-wide online ranking: Six Baltic Sea Wonders and others.

35 www.yepat.info

36 AGORA 2.0 compiles tools and information concerning sustainable tourism and makes them accessible for

interested users. The source for this information is partners representing all three dimensions of sustainability, different levels of administration and tourism management and different thematic interests, projects, actors and stakeholders of tourism www.agora2-tourism.net.

Greifswald University continued the cooperation with other INTERREG IV A and B projects. During a workshop in Greifswald, 26-27 January 2011, leaders of seven ongoing tourismrelated BSR projects decided on a work plan to develop a “Manual on sustainable tourism in the BSR” – also involving BSR-wide / European umbrella organisations. The Leader of FP 12.10 is a member of the CBSS Expert Group on Sustainable Development – Baltic 21. The content of this FP is also included in the new Baltic 21 strategy.

To act as a lead partner of an INTERREG IV B project and as an FP coordinator at the same time is a challenging task – but at present it is the only source for financing activities for the FP by projects. Unfortunately, these projects require lots of time for extensive administration tasks which could be better used for work on contents.

FP 12.10 gets financial support through the project AGORA 2.0 (INTERREG IV B Baltic Sea Region Programme 2007-13).

The project AGORA 2.0 will be finished in December 2012. FP 12.10 is expected to finish at the same time. A progress review will be submitted at the end of 2011.

12.11. Health: “Alcohol and drug prevention among youth” – project aimed at reducing hazardous and harmful alcohol use and alcohol and substance use in general among young people. (Lead: Northern Dimension Partnership in Public Health and Social Well-being (NDPHS) and its member countries; Deadline for progress review: to be determined) FAST TRACK

Report: The preparation of the project proposal for application for funding is ongoing. Three project planning meetings have been held so far. As of February 2011, 11 countries and organisations are involved in the project planning process: the Baltic Healthy Cities Association, the Baltic Sea States Sub-regional Cooperation, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Latvia, the Nordic Council of Ministers, Norway, Poland, Russia and Sweden.

Financing matters are among the main challenges. There are no financing programmes that would accept an application involving all partner countries and organisations. Therefore, it was decided to split the project into one project specifically for Russia and another – similar project – for the other partners.

The next step is to finalise the project proposal with the aim of submitting it for funding in 2011. A project planning meeting was scheduled for 6 June 2011 in Helsinki, Finland.

12.12. Health: “Improvement of public health by promotion of equitably distributed high quality primary health care systems” – project aimed helping increase cost-efficiency of the public health system and more efficiently counteracting communicable diseases as well as health problems related to social factors. (Lead: the Northern Dimension Partnership in Public Health and Social Well-being (NDPHS) and the Blekinge County Council; Deadline for progress review: mid-2011) FAST TRACK

Report: The project includes 12 project partners from Belarus, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania and Sweden, as well as Kaliningrad Region, Russia as an associated project partner. The project has now moved from the planning phase to the implementation phase. The project activities were affected by the decision to close down the Committee for International Health Care Collaboration (SEEC), the previous Lead Partner of the project. Fortunately, the Blekinge County Council has agreed to take over as a Lead Partner, although the time-frame for the planned activities, milestones and deliverables is lagging behind due to the abovementioned difficulties.

So far, the following detailed activities and outputs have been realised:

(i) Country working papers, outlining existing remuneration/incentive payment schemes, have been prepared and are used to produce a transnational synthesis report. Based on this report, a transnationally valid incentive payment scheme will be developed and piloted in Latvia;

(ii) In parallel, a working group on quality indicators for primary health care performance has conducted research into indicators that are being used in the participating countries and Great Britain (which is an advanced country in the field) and how reporting systems are set up. The data collected is being used to create a joint basis and approach for the implementation of a new remuneration system which will foster efficiency and quality, through both financial incentives and benchmarking between the General Practitioners;

(iii) Two nurse training weeks have been held in Turku, Finland (October 2010) and Blekinge, Sweden (November 2010);

(iv) The ImPrim Project website (www.oek.se/imprim) is updated on a regular basis and is user-friendly. The website contains information about the project achievements and provides access to the relevant documentation. It also provides information about the upcoming ImPrim activities and the events organised by associated organisations.

As to the next steps, the following milestones and deliverables were expected by May 2011:

(i) Transnational workshop in Klaipeda, Lithuania, to present and discuss mid-term evaluation results of a pilot project on testing a jointly developed incentive payment scheme in Latvia;

(ii) Training instrument developed for the medical qualification and basic graduation of a physician;

(iii) Transnational workshop on motivational counselling in Turku, Finland;

(iv) Guidelines developed on the use of tools for quality improvement from a bottom-up perspective;

(v) Presentation of a multilingual ToT Programme containing BSR best practice for leaders in professional development;

(vi) 3rd Transnational Partner Meeting in Turku, Finland;

(vii) Pilot project in Gomel, Belarus: two rural practices equipped according to modern standards;

(viii) Kick-off pilot project: “Health Synergy”, Klaipeda, Lithuania;

(ix) ImPrim Newsletter on professional development issues.

12.13. Health: "ICT for Health" – Strengthening social capacities for the utilisation of eHealth technologies in the framework of the ageing population. The INTERREG IV B project "ICT for Health" is managed within the eHealth for Regions network and is aimed at contributing to better deployment of eHealth technologies through enhancing social capacity, acceptance and knowledge of citizens and medical professionals. It addresses some of the key challenges of the Baltic Sea Region, namely demographic changes and the large differences with regard to access to, and quality of, health services. (Lead: University of Applied Sciences, Flensburg; Deadline for finalisation: December 2012).

Report: The ICT for Health is running according to the planned timeframe and has encountered no serious problems so far. After 14 months of fundamental conceptual work, project partners are now starting the implementation work, e.g., the piloting of learning courses.

So far, the following detailed activities and outputs have been realised:

(i) To raise awareness about the project, key project messages were formulated;

(ii) Communication tools (website, SharePoint) were implemented (www.ictforhealth.net);

(iii) An eHealth-Acceptance-Index (EAI) measuring eHealth acceptance was developed;

(iv) The impact of demographic change on health care systems in the partner regions was compared;

(v) The first version of a web-based learning course for citizens with chronic heart failure (SALUDA) is ready and the recruitment of patients for the pilot started;

(vi) Practice of eHealth teaching for professionals as well as selected patient education being offered in five partner countries was surveyed. Possible teaching content for the target groups is described;

(vii) The special needs of people with chronic diseases travelling and the possible effects from the electronic health record on patient empowerment were analysed;

(viii) Exchange with other projects established (“Best Agers”, “epSOS”).

The ICT for Health runs from January 2010 to December 2012. The next steps are to:

(i) Hold an online debate on the topic of eHealth acceptance, planned for spring 2011;

(ii) Carry out a pilot run with 400 participants with chronic heart failure to test the SALUDA learning course in all partner countries and to measure the effectiveness of eHealth acceptance and self-monitoring, planned to run in summer and autumn 2011;

(iii) Formulate eHealth education standards and conceptualise an eHealth Master programme, planned from spring to winter 2011;

(iv) Launch the multilingual personal health portal, planned to run from summer 2011 until the evaluation at the end of 2012.

Pillar 4: To make the Baltic Sea Region a safe and secure place

PA 13: To become a leading region in maritime safety and in Coordinated

security by Finland and

Denmark

Brief summary of overall progress:

The coordination process started in late 2009. It is necessary to recall that this Priority Area did not build on existing structures, thus the efforts to get activities initiated started from scratch. The Priority Area Coordinators, the Danish Maritime Safety Administration and the Finnish Ministry of Transport and Communications, have established an international Steering Committee to provide advice and assistance.

The creation of an efficient Steering Committee with well defined terms of reference can be considered as a good practice for other Priority Areas. It provides added value in creating a multi-national cross-sectoral forum for project-oriented as well as political dialogue among the Baltic Sea States, gathering leaders, experts and generalists from a wide range of different national ministries and government agencies with an interest in maritime safety and security. Therefore, the Steering Committee supplements the existing forums of the Region, which are frequently dealing with a single or a few highly specialised items. So far, three meetings have been held and in future two regular and one thematic meeting are planned per year.

The Priority Area Coordinators have also made much effort to establish new networks and ensure as broad participation of stakeholders as possible, e.g. representatives of other Priority Areas or of the BONUS programme are invited to the meetings, and there is regular contact with the relevant Priority Area Coordinator(s) from the Danube Strategy to exchange experience and lessons learned. The Priority Area Coordinators have been trying to actively involve third countries and will continue to encourage the participation of Iceland, Norway and the Russian Federation.

It is worth noting, that in late 2010, a major project, which forms a part of the “Motorways of the Sea concept” was approved by the EU Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T). The project is entitled “Motorways and electronic navigation by intelligence at Sea” (MONALISA) and supports the implementation of two fields of Priority Area no. 13 (resurveying of major sea routes and e-Navigation) as well as priority fields of Priority Areas 4 and 11. Albeit not formally a Flagship Project of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region, it is indeed a contribution to the implementation of the Strategy, for which reason the project has a standing invitation to attend Steering Committee meetings of Priority Area 13 in order to brief about the progress of this project.

The main added value of the current set up of the Priority Area seems to be in assisting Flagship Projects in conveying results and recommendations to the political level. By doing so, the Priority Area Coordinators can help to ensure that different projects, including those of other Priority Areas, cooperate and share experience, if relevant. The Priority Area has the potential to identify and make proposals for further cooperation within its area.

A new potential Flagship Project proposal was favourably discussed during the Steering Committee meeting in March 2011, namely “BaltWin – Enhanced Ice Navigation in Challenging Conditions of the Baltic Sea” which focuses on finding better and safer ways of handling winter navigation in the Baltic Sea.

The main challenges have been funding of the Flagship Projects as well as lack of human and financial resources available to the Priority Area Coordinators. However, the latter problem should be solved by the grant for the technical assistance offered via the Commission's services by the European Parliament.

The actions are not reported on separately, but relate to the Flagship Projects.

Action:

Strategic actions:

  “Create a common maritime management system and monitoring, information and intelligence sharing environment for the Baltic Sea”: While respecting relevant data protection provisions, the creation of an integrated network of reporting and surveillance systems is needed for all maritime activities, such as maritime safety, maritime security, protection of the marine environment, fisheries control, customs, border control and law enforcement. In addition, there is a need to identify possible gaps and inconsistencies in fields where cooperation between civil and military assets exists, or could be developed in the future. The network should build on existing and future initiatives and pilots to integrate systems.

Report:

  “Improve the coordination of systems relating to ship routing and monitoring vessel traffic, and consider establishing new systems”. The task is also to improve the coordination and information-sharing mechanisms between the existing systems to ensure their effective interoperability. Coastal states should jointly consider whether new measures (routing/traffic separation schemes/mandatory reporting systems) should be introduced. Decisions on these measures should be based on an analysis of the risks and effectiveness of the measures based on a formal safety assessment and research projects. Improved satellite navigation systems should be jointly utilised, such as Galileo, to support maritime positioning and navigation, especially for Automatic Identification Systems (AIS), Vessel Traffic Management Systems (VMS), and hazardous-cargo monitoring, for port approaches, ports and restricted waters as well as for safety systems for Search and Rescue.

Report:

  “Jointly apply surveillance tools”, such as coastal radars, Automatic Identification Systems (AIS), Vessel Monitoring Systems (VMS), Long Range Identification and Tracking of Ships (LRIT), earth observation satellites and maritime patrol, in the Baltic Sea Region. The cooperation between Baltic Sea Region Member States and the European

Maritime Safety Agency in tracing illegal discharges by ships will continue 37 . Further

dialogue between relevant authorities, including the armed forces, to investigate the possibility of jointly operating national assets at regional level should take place.

Report:

103 Cooperative actions:

  “Ensure that vessels, in particular those transporting energy products or other dangerous cargo, are up to the highest maritime safety standards” and that crews serving onboard are well trained, in the framework of EU efforts on quality shipping especially in the light of the recently adopted third EU maritime safety package.

Report:

Flagship Projects (as examples):

  13.1. “Conduct a technical feasibility study on a Baltic Sea Coastguard etwork”. It should involve national “coast guard-like” services in EU Member States and third countries, in the context of maritime safety, maritime security, and pollution prevention and response in the Baltic Sea. (Lead: Finnish Coast Guard tbc, relevant European agencies to be associated, DG MARE to follow up; Deadline for finalisation: 31 December 2011)

Report:

Leader: The Finnish Border Guard has been confirmed as leader of this Flagship Project which is being implemented through the “Baltic Sea Maritime Functionalities” project.

Description: The Baltic Sea Maritime Functionalities project (BSFM) is aimed at developing maritime actors by defining cooperation, conceptualising maritime functions and creating target statuses in relation to them, and demonstrating these functions in the context of the Baltic Sea. The project’s objective is to create the viewpoint of the Baltic Sea Region on European Union’s CISE (Common Information Sharing Environment for the surveillance of the EU maritime domain) project where all the actors are involved. The aim is to depict the maritime functionalities from the viewpoint of one state and to depict their connection to the international exchange of information. However, while conducting the project, the existing development work (e.g. CISE TAG, MARSUNO) should be considered so that all overlapping and possible competition will be avoided.

State-of-play: A draft of the project’s written study was produced as part of the Finnish national preparation in March 2011. The parts of the study that are being developed in other projects, such as MARSUNO, are referenced directly from them. The planning of the study demo has started. The idea is to utilise the functionalities of the SUCBAS demo in exchanging surface situational images and to engage it with information exchange entities from different actors using the rules defined in data management and from the viewpoint of the subtext. Implementation of the demo’s design is planned for the EU integrated maritime policy meeting scheduled to take place on 4 October 2011 in Poland. The planning of the study demo has started. Financing: no external financing is foreseen

Next steps: As the draft is finished, the participants defined in the preparation phase will be offered a possibility to take part in the study. The final participants finalise the definitions and goals for the functionalities, as well as the requirements of data management. The design of the demo’s details continues after the draft of the study’s written part is finished.

Expected finalisation: new deadline has been set – December 2011.

  13.2. “Become a pilot region for the integration of maritime surveillance systems”. The overall objective of this Maritime Policy pilot project and preparatory action is to develop and test mechanisms for improving maritime awareness by sharing operational information between government departments and agencies responsible for monitoring

activities at sea of all Baltic Sea countries 38 . One specific goal is the development of

technical interfaces that securely allow for all countries to join in a common situational image containing restricted law enforcement and other information. (Lead: the MARSUNO pilot project is led by Sweden, DG MARE to follow up; Deadline for

finalisation: 31 December 2011) FAST TRACK

Report:

Leader: Swedish Coast Guard

Description: The pilot project is a step towards achieving the aims of rendering existing monitoring and tracking systems more interoperable between at least three coastal Member States of the Northern European Sea basins (hereinafter "the project partners"). In particular, the aim is to determine the extent to which this cooperation enhances exchanges of information and enforcement of international, EU and national legislation as well as cooperation that already takes place between the Member States. The objectives of the project are:

  • 1. 
    To test the capacity of project partners to exchange surveillance and monitoring information relating to Coast Guarding activities that take place in the Northern European Sea basins.
  • 2. 
    To test joint maritime surveillance operational procedures between law enforcement authorities. Testing may include joint sharing of existing systems as well as observations and development of procedures for joint operations.
  • 3. 
    To determine the extent to which project partners are potentially able to set up an exchange of information – basic data – mechanism at a cross-sectoral and cross-border level that is viable and durable in time, also concerning cooperation between civil and military assets.
  • 4. 
    To identify legal, administrative and technical obstacles that may hinder the exchange of the above-mentioned information on a long-term basis.
  • 5. 
    To identify – on the basis of the acquired experience in exchanging the information – best practices and/or legal adjustments needed to overcome the obstacles identified.
  • 6. 
    To determine the extent of added value in both qualitative and quantitative terms, and relate this to what already exists from a cross-border/cross-sectoral cooperation perspective.

The work is divided into six work groups or so-called "layers":

  • 1. 
    Integrated Border Management – Law Enforcement (IBM-LE)
  • 2. 
    Vessel Traffic Monitoring Information Systems (VTMIS)
  • 3. 
    Maritime Pollution Response (MPR)
  • 4. 
    Search and Rescue (SAR)
  • 5. 
    Fisheries Control (FC)
  • 6. 
    Maritime Situational Awareness (MSA)

State-of-play: The MARSUNO project has been in operation for 15 months and is following the work plan with some minor deviations. Several groups have finished their first sub-tasks and work has started on five thematic reports of the project’s layers 1-5, summing up the

38 Cooperation should also be developed with other relevant projects such as MARSUR organised by the

European Defence Agency and SUCBAS led by Finland. The aim of SUCBAS (Sea Surveillance Cooperation Baltic Sea) is to adapt and develop multinational cooperation within Sea Surveillance in the Baltic Sea area.

Participating countries are Finland, Sweden, Estonia, Latvia, Germany, Denmark, Poland and Lithuania.

EDA MARSUR aims at developing a solution that fulfils the need for a coherent, common, recognised maritime picture for the ESDP maritime mission and tasks taking into account the inter-pillar approach. The project includes 14 Member States (CY, DE, ES, FI, FR, GR, PT, UK, BE, IT, IE, NL, PL, SE) as well as EUMS,

EMSA, FROTEX, JRC, EUSC and the European Commission.

results and recommendations they have agreed on within each work group. A final report will be delivered to the European Commission/DG MARE by the end of December 2011, under the responsibility of the Maritime Situational Awareness layer (work group). During 2010 a lot of effort was made regarding the mapping project partners’ capacity to exchange surveillance and monitoring information, and this is continuing during 2011. It is foreseen that in the autumn of 2011 one of the work groups will perform a demo and examine how the information exchange work can be based on different platform solutions. A gap analysis identifying administrative, technical and legal obstacles will be carried out during March 2011 and the results from this will be used in the project’s further work. The final report will emphasise best practice within different sectors and suggest solutions for identified gaps to improve conditions for information exchange with other EU Member States as well as third countries.

Financing: Total budget: €3 047 085; EU contribution: maximum €1 896 810; the grant agreement between the European Commission and the Swedish Coast Guard was signed on 28 December 2009. Each participating authority will contribute a minimum level of financing, as stated in the grant agreement, while the EU Commission will contribute approximately 60% of the specified amount. Next steps: A gap analysis will be carried out within all working groups. Several seminars were scheduled for the spring of 2011. From September to December 2011, the project’s work groups will finalise their work in different reports containing examples of best practice solutions for information exchange, and suggestions of how to improve identified obstacles for information exchange within the different sectors (user communities).

  13.3. “Speed up re-surveying of major shipping routes and ports”, as agreed in HELCOM, in order to ensure that safety of navigation is not endangered by inadequate source information. (Lead: HELCOM in cooperation with the International Hydrographic Organisation; Deadline for progress review: 2013)

Report:

Description: The aim of the project is to speed up hydrographic re-surveys of the Baltic Sea, and thus to contribute to improving the safety of navigation. More specifically, the activity aims at developing and starting implementation of the revised Baltic Sea Re-survey Scheme, to be based on national re-survey plans and to cover the whole Baltic Sea area in a harmonised way. The 2002 Re-survey Scheme, developed by the Baltic Sea Hydrographic Commission (BSHC) following the HELCOM 2001 Copenhagen Declaration, will be revised e.g. taking into account the actual shipping routes (based on AIS) and the new routing measures established or planned in the Baltic Sea. The hydrographic re-surveys are a continuous activity. It has been agreed by the coastal countries that the national re-survey plans, including time schedule estimations, are to be finalised and presented preferably by 2013, but not later than 2015.

Motorways and electronic navigation by intelligence at sea - "MonaLisa project" (September 2010 – December 2013): Albeit not formally a Flagship Project, the MonaLisa project is considered to contribute to the implementation of Priority Area 13, in particular Flagship Project 13.3, for which reason a brief description of the project is included here. The project is led by the Swedish Maritime Administration. Its total budget amounts to €22.4 million, of which 50% is co-financing provided by the Trans-European Networks. The MonaLisa project is divided into four activities:

  • 1. 
    Dynamic and proactive route planning – "Green Routes"
  • 2. 
    Verification System for officers’ certifications
  • 3. 
    Quality assurance of hydrographic data
  • 4. 
    Global sharing of maritime information

Quality assured hydrographic surveys are urgent due to the increasing number of large vessels navigating with deep draft. Verifying that unknown shoals do not exist between old sounding lines is urgent, and is the reason re-surveys must be performed as soon as possible. Re-survey of HELCOM fairways and Baltic Sea port areas should be carried out as soon as possible by way of modern, quality-assured methods to ensure that hydrographic data is presented in nautical charts and other nautical publications. The activity of re-surveying major sea routes (HELCOM fairways cat. I and II) started in September 2010. The other activities are starting in 2011.

State of play: The revision of the Baltic Sea Re-survey Scheme, including its principles, has been agreed on at a political level (HELCOM Ministerial Meeting on 20 May 2010, Moscow). The BSHC committed in September 2010 to implementation of the revised Scheme and tasked its Monitoring Working Group with developing the harmonised scheme by 2013 (2015). Currently, re-surveys have been mainly on the so-called category 1 areas. The amount of re-surveyed areas are increasing, but still there is a lot of re-surveying to be done even on category 1 areas. The re-survey database is available at http://helcomresurvey.sjofartsverket.se/helcomresurveysite/ .

Next steps: The MWG is planning to have a meeting in May 2011 with the aim being to review the progress, to agree on implementation details and to have a workshop where all can jointly load their re-survey areas into the database. This meeting will also prepare for reporting to IRCC3, EUSBSR, BSHC and HELCOM. The BSHC will report the re-survey scheme and the database to the IHO Inter-Regional Coordination Committee (IRRC) at its 3rd meeting in May 2011 as an example of a regional implementation of the World Wide Status of Hydrographic Surveying (C-55). The EU TEN-T MonaLisa project, which inter alia aims to carry out re-surveys in Finnish and Swedish waters, was approved in late 2010. The BSHC will review the progress of the implementation at its 16th Conference in September 2011.

Expected finalisation: The new Baltic Sea Re-survey Scheme is to be fully harmonised and put in place by 2015 at the latest. However, most of the BSHC members have strong intentions to finalise their schemes by 2013. Generally, national re-surveys are a continuous activity according to specific national timetables.

  13.4. “Become a pilot region for e-navigation 39 by establishing one or more enavigation

trial zones, in view of the gradual achievement of an integrated network of enavigation systems for European coastal waters and the high seas (Efficient, Safe and Sustainable Traffic at Sea (EfficienSea) project, financed by the ‘Baltic Sea Region’ transnational programme). (Lead: Danish Maritime Safety Administration; Deadline for finalisation: 31 December 2011) FAST TRACK

Report:

Description: This Flagship Project relates to a work package of the EU INTERREG IV B Baltic Sea Programme project “Efficient Safe and Sustainable Traffic at Sea” (EfficienSea). e

Navigation 40 is a concept under development that provides the mariner with the information

39 According to the E-navigation Committee of the International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and

Lighthouse Authorities, "E-navigation is the harmonized creation, collection, integration, exchange and presentation of maritime information on board and ashore by electronic means to enhance berth-to-berth navigation and related services, for safety and security at sea and protection of the marine environment."

40 According to the e-Navigation Committee of the International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and

Lighthouse Authorities, "E-navigation is the harmonized creation, collection, integration, exchange and

required to navigate safely and effectively. Information is gathered from a number of sources from the vessel’s own sensors as well as shore-side services, which is processed and presented to the mariner in a single system. In contrast, today information is often presented on a number of different displays onboard that only partially can exchange information. e Navigation will help to reduce information complexity and thus enhance safety. The aim of the EfficienSea e-Navigation work is two-fold: a) to prepare project partners for e-Navigation through the development of prototype services and the establishment of test beds in the Baltic Sea with vessels, users and infrastructure; and b) to support and assist the global e-Navigation process.

State of play: The Flagship Project is progressing well and has completed the preparations for the establishment of e-Navigation trial zones and started work on developing prototypes for several e-Navigation services. A number of prototype services, including provision of meteorological and oceanographic data on routes, maritime safety information presented in the nautical chart and route exchange facilities, are already operational. The prototype services developed will e.g. allow the mariner to be notified directly, if a lighthouse is unlit, a buoy is out of position or waves reach a certain height. The prototype also offers route exchange, allowing two vessels to exchange planned routes, which reduces the risk of collision at sea while also increasing authorities’ possibilities to foresee and warn the vessels against dangerous situations. The actual testing of the infrastructure for e-Navigation onboard a number of vessels was launched in September 2010. One of the objectives of the project is to make the test results available to the international community working with e-Navigation. From 31 January to 2 February 2011 the EfficienSea project, in cooperation with the International Association for Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA) and other partners, organised the conference “e-Navigation Underway”. The conference gathered 130 delegates from 21 countries onboard the cruise liner M/S Crown of Scandinavia, one of the vessels in the project’s test fleet. Representatives from the maritime community including international organisations, industry, research institutes and national authorities presented e-Navigation test bed results from all over the world in order to exchange lessons learned and methodology. The conference resulted in 19 concrete recommendations for the e

Navigation process 41 . The EfficienSea e-Navigation work can be considered a regional

contribution to the ongoing development of a future, global standard for e-Navigation within the International Maritime Organization – the UN agency responsible for the safety and security of shipping. Problems encountered and solutions found: while the development of e Navigation is progressing well, it has become clear, that the testing and full development of the e-Navigation concept will require more time and funding. Funding for the work on e Navigation beyond the completion of the EfficienSea project by January 2012 is uncertain.

Financing: The total budget of the EfficienSea project is approximately €8 million, while the budget of the e-Navigation work package is €1 953 786, of which the EU finances 75%.

Next steps: The project runs from 2009 to January 2012. During 2011 the work to test the prototype services as well as the infrastructure will continue.

Expected finalisation: The project will be completed by January 2012, but it is foreseen that additional efforts to develop and implement e-Navigation are required.

  13.5. “Create a network of centres of excellence for maritime training” to provide young people with attractive prospects for a life-long career in maritime enterprises / professions and facilitate mobility between sea and land-based jobs. “Jointly develop high

presentation of maritime information on board and ashore by electronic means to enhance berth-to-berth navigation and related services, for safety and security at sea and protection of the marine environment."

108 standards of training, drills and exercises” for upgrading seafarers' competences and adapting requirements to today's shipping industry (sophisticated vessels, ICT, security and safety, navigation in icy conditions). Ensure familiarity with security plans and

procedures for ship and port facility security. 42 (Lead: Poland; Deadline for progress

review: 1 June 2011)

Report:

Leader: The Polish Ministry of Infrastructure has overall responsibility, while the Maritime University of Szczecin has been appointed to lead the project.

Description: The aim of the project is to deliver best practices of European maritime training institutions to provide young people with attractive prospects for a life-long career in maritime enterprises / professions and facilitate mobility between sea and land-based jobs, as well as upgrading competences to adapt requirements to today’s shipping industry. The following general steps are planned to be carried out:

  • 1. 
    To establish a European network of cooperative academies and centres of maritime training, supported by representatives of maritime transport and industry;
  • 2. 
    To provide education and training that correspond to the industry's needs and expectations; 3. To create a Joint European best practice model for broad maritime career possibilities; 4. To create a life-long learning system for those who work at sea. The project is expected to run from 2010 – 2012.

State of play: An initial international seminar entitled “Create a network of centers of excellence for maritime training” took place on 1 October 2010 at the Maritime University of Szczecin, Poland. Representatives of the European Commission, the EMSA, the Polish Ministry of Infrastructure and nine European countries participated in the event. The seminar defined strategic goals of future work and networks, objectives and steps forward. The project´s website www.c4mt.eu was also launched. Recalling the outcome of the seminar, the Flagship Project Leader has investigated possible ways of financing the project and has established a consortium of 13 Baltic Sea Region maritime training institutions, with the aim being to submit an application to the Baltic Sea Region Programme. Problems encountered and solutions found: the main difficulty is to find suitable EU funds to carry out the project. The consortium created will allow the project proposal flexibility as concerns the opportunity to send a letter of application for calls of other financing programmes.

Financing: An application for funding was to be submitted to the 4th Call of the Baltic Sea Region Programme by 31 March 2011. Simultaneously, other ways of financing are also being considered.

Next steps: Organising the 2nd seminar of the project (Gdynia on 20 May 2011); Elaborating the best practice model of maritime training.

Expected finalisation: The project is planned to be completed by 2014, by which time a model for curriculum consisting of best practices and standards for maritime training and education is to be delivered.

  13.6. “Develop a plan to reduce the number of accidents in fisheries”. This could be achieved by improving the way information on accidents is gathered and analysed, enhanced training and awareness programmes, as well as sharing best practices and developing specific measures to increase the safety of fishermen. (Lead: Member States and/or Inter-Governmental Body tbc; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

42 Experience could be drawn inter alia from the DaGoB project (Safe and Reliable Transport Chains of

Dangerous Goods in the Baltic Sea Region), a project part-financed by the European Regional Development

Fund within the BSR INTERREG IIIB Neighbourhood Programme, 2006-07.

Report:

State of play: There is currently no lead for this Flagship Project, which is why the Priority Area’s Steering Committee worked on resolving this during its initial three meetings, and foresees to revert to the topic again at its next meeting. At a meeting of the Steering Committee in March 2011, the representative of the European Commission’s Directorate General for Maritime Policy and Fisheries informed that the issue of accidents in fisheries had

been discussed at a recent meeting of the Baltic Sea Regional Advisory Council (BSRAC 43 )

whose aim is to advise the European Commission and Member States on matters relating to management of the fisheries in the Baltic Sea. As reported, the BSRAC might have an interest in the Flagship Project, thus the Priority Area Coordinators will investigate this possibility.

  13.7. "Conduct a formal risk assessment for L G carriers in the Baltic Sea Area". Maritime transportation of liquefied natural gases (LNG) for energy consumption has become an increasingly important market. This is expected to affect the Baltic Sea Region as well. Experience with accidents relating to LNG ships and LNG terminals is very limited. There is a need for a formal risk assessment (FSA) for this type of maritime transportation within the Baltic Sea Region. The purpose is to identify any preventive measures and regulations in relation to safety and security. The FSA should involve both government and industry stakeholders with the scope to develop model procedures, contingency plans, guidelines and legislative incentives. The initiative is only possible through proper funding, and a pre-study on possible funding should be undertaken (Lead: Poland; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report:

Leader: The Polish Ministry of Infrastructure has the overall responsibility, while the Maritime University of Szczecin was appointed to lead a project, which should ideally also involve other interested EU Member States and organisations.

Description: It should be noted that this Flagship Project was not included under Priority Area 13 in the original version of the Action Plan, but its inclusion got broad support from Member States and was subsequently confirmed by the EUSBSR High Level Group. The purpose of conducting a risk assessment is to determine any preventive measures and regulations related to security and safety. A formal risk assessment should include interested parties from both the governments and industry in order to develop standard procedures, emergency plans, guidelines and legal incentives. The aim is to perform analysis in order to understand the risks associated with the use of LNG tankers in the Baltic Sea. The possibility of a tanker accident especially in the vicinity of population centres (grounding), when passing passenger ferries (collisions) and crossing under the bridges (a collision with the pillars of bridges, acts of terrorism) should also be carefully assessed.

State of play: A kick-off meeting was scheduled to be held in Szczecin, Poland in April 2011, depending on feedback from the Baltic Sea Region Programme.

Financing: An application entitled "Marine LNG technology in the Baltic Sea – risk, environmental impact, economical effectiveness" was to be submitted by the Maritime University of Szczecin for the 4th Call of the Baltic Sea Region Programme by 31 March 2011. In this project proposal, one of the work packages (WP 3 Formal risk analysis of LNG

43 BSRAC is one of seven Regional Advisory Councils established by the European Council to increase stakeholder

involvement in the development of a successful Common Fisheries Policy. The other RACs are for the Mediterranean Sea, the North Sea, North western waters, South-western waters, Pelagic stocks and High seas/long distance fleet, cf. http://www.bsrac.org

carriers in the Baltic Sea) is entirely devoted to Flagship Project 13.7.

Next steps: A meeting of stakeholders was scheduled for the first quarter of 2011, its objectives: to create a Steering Committee with a view to submitting a project proposal to the Baltic Sea Region Programme 2007-13.

Expected finalisation: Proposed deadline – 2014.

PA 14: To reinforce maritime accident response capacity Coordinated

protection from major emergencies by Denmark

Brief summary of overall progress:

A national preparation meeting on the PA took place in April 2010 to prepare for the macroregional kick-off meeting in May. It included participants from seven different Danish public authorities. One main focus was trying to find ways of involving partners from other Baltic Sea Region countries as lead partners in the two Flagship Projects without a lead (14.1 "Assess volunteer troops’ capacities regarding maritime pollution response, as well as maritime search and rescue operations”; and 14.3 "Develop scenarios and identify gaps for all main hazards of the Baltic Sea Region"). However, only Estonia and Finland attended the kick-off meeting of 28th of May 2010, and none of the participants had the necessary mandate to take on a lead part in the Flagship Projects.

As it is clear that a whole Priority Area should not be the task of one single country, the Commission has initiated work on supporting Priority Area 14. It is believed that part of the explanation behind the difficulties encountered by the Priority Area Coordinator in developing a macro-regional network stems from the fact that the subject area is dealt with by different authorities in different countries (i.e. the Ministry of Defence in one country, the Ministry of the Environment in another country, and so forth). Promisingly, the effort to revitalise the area has already resulted in additional contact points being nominated in Sweden, Finland and Germany. The Commission is also looking at other ways of supporting the development of networks in the area, including the possibility of having an external consultant examine the area.

However, there is some progress in two Flagship Projects, namely:

14.2. "Map existing marine pollution response capacities and make sub-regional plans for cross-border response cooperation", led by the Admiral Danish Fleet Headquarters, which is working towards presenting the Region with its first overall risk assessment of pollution caused by shipping accidents covering the entire Baltic Sea area (including Russia) based on a common methodology, and 14.3. "Develop scenarios and identify gaps for all main hazards of the Baltic Sea Region" where the Council of the Baltic States (including Russia) has shown interest in taking the lead.

Action:

Strategic actions:

  “Implement the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan 44 (BSAP)” to ensure swift national

and international response to maritime pollution incidents, including intensifying cooperation between offshore and shoreline response (notably including local and regional authorities), and enhanced cooperation on places of refuge based on Directive 2002/59 i. Furthermore, a mutual plan for places of refuge is under development to ensure that a ship

44 Agreed in November 2007 by Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Germany, Denmark,

Russia and the European Community.

in distress is always granted the most suitable place of refuge irrespective of national borders.

Report:

Cooperative actions:

  “Develop a winter storms and storm surge prevention and preparedness approach” in the Baltic Sea Region. Develop methods on how to enhance cooperation between different local, regional and national agencies having a role in emergency operations relating to winter storms and storm surge, and on how to increase synergies with the Community Civil Protection Mechanism. Methods for cooperation should be given a broad interpretation including public awareness actions, contingency planning, disaster scenarios, communication systems, use of technology, joint exercises and training, etc.

Report:

Flagship Projects (as examples):

  14.1. “Assess volunteer troops’ capacities regarding maritime pollution response, as well as maritime search and rescue operations" using, among others, the VOMARE project, financed by the ‘Central Baltic’ cross-border programme, which is part of the ‘territorial cooperation’ objective. (Lead: Member States and/or Inter-Governmental Body tbc; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: the project has no lead and is not active for the moment. A number of innovative approaches, including expanding the understanding of the term ‘volunteer troops’ in order to widen the field of potential leaderships, have been attempted, but to no avail. The Priority Area Coordinator remains attentive to the Flagship Project, but ideas on how to persuade potential leaderships appear to have been exhausted.

  14.2. “Map existing marine pollution response capacities and make sub-regional plans for cross-border response cooperation” based on assessment of the integrated risk of

shipping accidents. (BRISK project 45 , financed by the ‘Baltic Sea Region’ transnational

programme, which is part of the ‘territorial cooperation’ objective). (Lead: Admiral Danish Fleet HQ; Deadline for finalisation: 24 October 2011) FAST TRACK

Report:

Lead: The Lead Partner of the BRISK-RU project is the Central Marine Research & Design Institute Ltd. in St. Petersburg, and the Coordinator is the Information Office of the Nordic Council of Ministers in Kaliningrad.

Description: The main effort is made through the BRISK project, the international project on the sub-regional risk of spills of oil and hazardous substances in the Baltic Sea. This project is developing a risk analysis model with the aim being to map areas with the highest risk of pollution and environmental damage caused by shipping activities. This analysis is the first overall risk assessment to cover pollution caused by shipping in the waters of all Baltic Sea countries based on a common methodology. The BRISK project will build a mutual understanding of the concepts of risk and damage, which is the first step to improve the capacities of the Baltic Sea countries to tackle medium-size and large spills of oil and

113 hazardous substances. The risk analysis model of BRISK takes a variety of risk-reducing measures into account. Risk-reducing measures include preventive measures such as the use of pilots’ onboard ships to assist in navigating through difficult waters as well as relief measures such as the emergency response for spills. This feature provides the possibility to model the effects of different response and prevention activities. The inclusion of riskreducing measures takes the risk analysis a decisive step forward – from simply describing the status quo into providing support to decision-makers for improving response strategies and planning investments in emergency capacities. Possible future scenarios can be investigated and compared by varying the type, number, location and intensity of more than a dozen different risk-reducing measures. The BRISK-RU project will carry out activities in the Russian Federation complementary to the BRISK activities.

State of play: The BRISK project is progressing very well and a risk analysis model including a variety of risk-reducing measures is under development.

Financing: The BRISK project’s total budget is around €3.3 million, with approximately €2.5 million to be allocated from the European Regional Development Fund. The BRISK-RU project is financed by the Nordic Council of Ministers. Expected finalisation: April 2012

  14.3. For all main hazards in the Baltic Sea Region, including winter storms and floods, "develop scenarios and identify gaps" in order to anticipate potential disasters, thus enabling a rapid and effective EU response through the Community Civil Protection Mechanism. In addition, and drawing on existing possibilities for funding in the Civil Protection Financial Instrument, strengthen training activities and exercises in cooperation with the countries of the Baltic Sea Region. (Lead: Member States and/or Inter Governmental Body tbc; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report:

Lead: The project had been dormant since the kick-off of the Priority Area until very recently, when an initiative facilitated during the Annual Forum of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region in Tallinn in October 2010 resulted in the Council of the Baltic Sea States taking leadership. Description: The project will map those risks, which have macro-regional and/or crossborder dimensions through geographic proximity, functional interdependencies or through other mechanisms, or where clearly joint approaches would bring added value and where assistance capacity is needed. It aims at providing a best practice, which can be used as a model for other EU macro-regions.

Funding: An application for the Civil Protection Financial Instrument - Call for proposals: "Projects on prevention and preparedness" was submitted before 18th of March 2011. Expected finalisation: 18 months from the start of the project.

PA 15: To decrease the volume of, and harm done by, cross Coordinated

border crime by Finland and

Lithuania

Brief summary of overall progress:

The Priority Area Coordinators have chosen to use the existing structures of cooperation, namely Europol and the Baltic Sea Task Force, especially its Operative Committee (BSTF OPC), as a main forum for coordinating the Priority Area. As the BSTF already facilitates cooperation between all the states in the Baltic Sea Region, the Priority Area Coordinators decided not to convene a kick-off meeting for the whole Priority Area. This approach has proved to be a success. On the one hand, the work combined in regular Law Enforcement cooperation did not require any extra financing, and on the other hand, the extra efforts required by the Flagship Projects were easily addressed by Europol, FRONTEX as well as concerned Member States and third countries.

The Priority Area content was modified in line with the Priority Area Coordinators' wishes at the High Level meeting on 12 April and 13 December, 2010 held in Brussels and published in the current updated Action Plan (December 2010 version). The Priority Area Coordinators opted for the following division of tasks: Finland took over the Flagship Projects 15.1, 15.2 and 15.4, while Lithuania took over the newly formulated (in December 2010) Flagship Projects 15.3 and 15.5. Links have been established with Priority Area 13 on producing the outcome for Flagship Project 15.2 "To create a single national coordination centre".

The Flagship Projects 15.1 and 15.4 are now successfully completed. The other three Flagship Projects are under way, with the work already started.

The EU-Russia Law Enforcement cooperation has suffered from the lack of an operational agreement between Europol and Russia.

Action:

Strategic actions:

  “Improvement of cooperation between customs, border guards and police”, both inside each Member State and between Member States, and including at sea: establish a common coordination mechanism based on existing cooperation bodies; use joint law enforcement actions, joint mobile patrol squads, joint investigation teams, joint intelligence teams, sharing of equipment between services and cooperation on the development, purchasing,

deployment and use of technology as frequent tools for practical cooperation 46 ; and

discuss with third countries their involvement in this cooperation. In parallel, it is necessary to “evaluate the potential for further integration of law enforcement functions and tasks”, while respecting the competences of relevant actors as established by national legislations, as part of the assessment of the implementation of the 2008-10 Strategy of the Task Force on Organised Crime in the Baltic Sea Region (BSTF). This

46 Without affecting the responsibilities of FRONTEX regarding the coordination of operational cooperation

between Member States at the external borders.

should also be seen in the light of actions aiming at improving the functioning of the Single Market.

Report: The Strategic Actions were reformulated for parts of the Flagship Projects, see below.

Flagship Projects (as examples):

  15.1. “Conduct a threat assessment for the Baltic Sea Region”, in line with the Organised Crime Threat Assessment methodology, concerning organised crime and border security, and longer term threat assessment of critical infrastructure. (Lead: Europol in cooperation with the BSTF and Baltic Sea Regional Border Control Cooperation and FRONTEX as concerns external borders (coordinated by Finland); Deadline for finalisation: 31 December 2010) FAST TRACK

Report:

Lead: This Project was led by Europol in good cooperation with Member States, the BSTF and FRONTEX as concerns external borders. Europol received high-level contributions from the Member States, third countries (Norway and Russia) and FRONTEX according to the agreed schedule.

Description: The Threat Assessment was created in line with Europol’s Organised Crime Threat Assessment methodology concerning organised crime and border security as well as longer term threat assessment of critical infrastructure for the Baltic Sea Region, including the source areas of this criminality. This project was led by Europol in good cooperation with the Member States, the BSTF, the Baltic Sea Regional Border Control Cooperation, and FRONTEX concerning the external borders. Europol and FRONTEX had the first Flagship meeting at Europol in June 2010, where all the Baltic Sea Region States (excluding Lithuania and Iceland) were represented. The meeting discussed the methodology for the material collection. The participating Member States and organisations received the technical requirements for the data collection with contact points, deadlines, etc.

State of play: The project was successfully completed two weeks before the deadline and its expected result, namely the Threat Assessment for the Baltic Sea Region (BOCTA), was published before mid December 2010. BOCTA consists of 25 pages of analysis on the collected material. The main findings are:

  • 1. 
    The division of the Baltic Sea Region into a prosperous, highly innovative North and West, and a less developed East and South, is creating opportunities for multiple criminal activities 2. Each country in the Region has its own set of indigenous organised crime groups (OCGs) that cooperate internationally
  • 3. 
    Lithuanian OCGs are key players in the Baltic Sea Region and are involved in multicommodity crime
  • 4. 
    Estonian OCGs may expand their role as a link between OCGs based in the Russian Federation and those based outside the Nordic region
  • 5. 
    Outlaw motorcycle gangs (OMCGs) are expanding their criminal activities in the Baltic states and Russia
  • 6. 
    Cigarette smuggling remains a major criminal activity of OCGs active in the Baltic Sea area
  • 7. 
    OCGs based in the Russian Federation specialise in the supply of illegal goods to the EU and in a range of economic crimes that include fraud and money laundering
  • 8. 
    OCGs active in cyber crime based in the Russian Federation, Ukraine and Estonia are amongst the most developed in that criminal field. With their advanced hacking skills they pose a significant threat to e-commerce worldwide
  • 9. 
    Nordic countries act as the main destination points for the trafficking of human beings in the Baltic Sea Region

On the basis of BOCTA, Finland and Europol took the initiative to invite a Senior Level Police Chiefs’ meeting to discuss and consider the future of the EU-Russian cooperation in various criminality areas. The meeting was held at Europol on 25 January 2011. Seventeen EU Member States, Russia (with a high level delegation), Norway, the Commission and the Council representatives participated in the meeting. The conclusions of the meeting were distributed to the participants and reported to the EU Law Enforcement Structures (COSI, Europol) and BSTF OPC. The follow-up of the meeting in the form of the operative cooperation (led by a single EU Member State) and other fora are currently under consideration. Europol has the possibility to support this cooperation.

Financing: The work has been done within the existing structures without any extra financing.

  15.2. “Create a single national coordination centre” in each Member State, which coordinates 24/7 the activities of all national authorities carrying out external border control tasks (detection, identification, tracking and interception) and which is able to exchange information with the centres in other Member States and with FRONTEX. “Create one single national border surveillance system”, which integrates surveillance and enables the dissemination of information 24/7 between all authorities involved in external border control activities in all or – based on risk analysis – selected areas of the external border. (EUROSUR phase 1). This Flagship Project will be linked to and completed under Priority Area 13 (“To become a leading region in maritime safety and in security”); there is also Law Enforcement Flagship Project 2: (“Become a pilot region for the integration of maritime surveillance systems”). (Lead: Finland; Deadline for finalisation: 31 December 2012) FAST TRACK

Report: This Flagship Project is linked with and carried out under Priority Area 13 (“To become a leading region in maritime safety and in security”), as are Flagship Projects 13.1 (“Conduct a technical feasibility study on a Baltic Sea Coastguard etwork” – "Baltic Sea Maritime Functionalities (BSFM)" project) and 13.2: (“Become a pilot region for the integration of maritime surveillance systems” – MARSUNO project). For more information on both Flagship Projects, please refer to Priority Area 13.

  15.3. “Implementation of the Baltic Sea Task Force on Organised Crime Regional Strategy 2010-14” (Lead: Lithuania; Deadline for progress review: 1 June 2011)

Report:

Description: The Flagship Project “Set up common Police and Customs Cooperation Centres” was reformulated in December 2010 at the High Level Group meeting to: “Implementation of the Baltic Sea Task Force on Organised Crime Regional Strategy 2010-14”.

The Baltic Sea Task Force (BSTF) sees its mission in supporting the participating countries, their governments and law enforcement agencies in delivering a coordinated overview and initiation of joint activities to meet both the operational and political needs in preventing and combating organised crime in the Baltic Sea Region (BSR). The major goals of the BSTF when implementing the BSR are as follows:

  • 1. 
    Strengthening the BSTF and Europol alignment
  • 2. 
    Facilitating operational cooperation to combat organised crime in the BSR
  • 3. 
    Further development of cooperation with other external partners
  • 4. 
    Development of the involvement of Russia in operational activities within the EU and Europol frameworks, based on regional needs.

Lithuania started its chairmanship of the Task Force on Organised Crime for the period of 2011-12. The leading of the Flagship Project 15.3 will be done within the BSTF OPC Secretariat.

State of play: The very first BSTF operational planning and coordination meeting, attended by representatives from 10 Baltic Sea Region states, Europol and Interpol was held in Vilnius, Lithuania on 24-25 February 2011. Among other issues, new initiatives following BOCTA findings (Flagship Project 15.1) and decisions of the EU-Russia high level meeting were agreed.

Financing: Lithuania has allocated certain financing in the 2011 governmental budget to cover the expenses of the presidency. The Priority Area Coordinators have also applied (25.02.2011) for a Technical Assistance grant (€120 000) offered by the European Parliament via the European Commission services. The aim is to use this extra financial support to activate the operative cooperation and common operative projects within the BSTF OPC work in 2011-12.

  15.4. “Pool resources for the posting of liaison officers to third countries and international organisations” in order to fight serious forms of cross-border crime, such as drug trafficking, inter alia by considering the further development of the existing Council Decision on the common use of liaison officers posted abroad by the law enforcement agencies of the Member States within the Baltic Sea Region. (Lead: Finland; Deadline for progress review: 1 June 2011)

Report:

Description: To more effectively fight serious forms of cross-border crime, such as drug trafficking, the aim is to elaborate the initiative of the cross-use of liaison officers posted to third countries from BSTF countries and enforce the EU Council Decision 2003/170 i/RIA from 27 February 2003.

State of play: The project was prepared by the BSTF Operative Committee (OPC). The first step taken during summer 2010 was to collect information on the Member States’ Liaison Officers posted abroad, both inside and outside the EU. During the meeting in Tallinn (Estonia, September 2010) the OPC agreed to encourage the EU Member States to more efficiently and regularly use the existing Liaison Officers Network for the needs and benefit of all the Member States in the Baltic Sea Region as well as to get the third countries' acceptance of the proposed working method. This decision was finally confirmed by the personal representatives of Heads of the Baltic Sea States (Task Force) in their meeting in Vihula Manor, Estonia (2nd December 2010).

Financing: no extra financing

  15.5. “Take preventive measures against trafficking in human beings” and provide support and protection for victims and groups at risk, by means of transnational actions. (Lead: Lithuania; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report:

Description: This project aims at identifying the extent of trafficking in human beings (THB) in the Baltic Sea Region as well as at coordinating prevention measures of different governmental and non-governmental agencies. Over the last decade, Lithuania has achieved very good results in this area, receiving international recognition for them. During Lithuania’s chairmanship of the CBSS, the Lithuanian Ministry of Internal Affairs together with the International Organisation for Migration (Vilnius Bureau) and the European Migration Network organised a conference on “Prevention and Control of THB – Regional Aspects” in Vilnius in May 2010. The conclusions of the Conference were accepted unanimously in close cooperation with the CBSS Task Force on Trafficking in Human Beings and the Directorate General for Justice and Home Affairs of the European Commission.

Next steps: It is foreseen to bring together a Situation Report produced by the CBSS Secretariat and a Europol Report on THB, which is currently being finalised. On the basis of the recommendations of both reports, suggestions for further actions under this Flagship Project will be made.

Financing: Since 2002, Lithuania has been coordinating prevention measures against THB according to the national 3-year programmes adopted, which used to receive considerable governmental financing. The recent national programme of 2009-12 has not received financial allocations due to difficulties of the ongoing economic crisis. With the identification of the concrete needs and objectives of the Flagship Project, Lithuania will apply to the EC for financial support.

Horizontal Actions

Actions:

  “Align available funding and policies to the priorities and actions of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region”.

The Strategy is not in itself a funding instrument: proposed actions should be funded, to the extent necessary, from existing sources. These may include Structural and Cohesion Funds, other EU funding (e.g. rural development funds, fisheries, external action, research, environment, etc.), national, regional and local funds, banks and International Financial Institutions (in particular the European Investment Bank (EIB)), NGOs and other private sources. These funding opportunities should be made more transparent for stakeholders and project participants. While many projects will have readily available funding, others may need assistance in identifying sources. Cooperation between Member States is crucial to achieve the desired result. The Member States, Regional and Local Authorities and private bodies could identify a body to act as the central point of reference for reconciling the availability of different sources of financing to the needs of the actions and projects. In a global sense, policies in general should also be better aligned. (Deadline for progress review: 31 December 2010)

Report: Please refer to the relevant sections in the Communication for a summary of the work on aligning funding with the Strategy. A separate document on the contribution of Structural Funds programmes to the Strategy will also be made available on the Strategy's website.

  “Cooperate on the transposition of EU directives” so that national implementing rules do not create unnecessary barriers. This would facilitate transnational initiatives and cooperation.

In many areas – Single Market, environment, transport interoperability, procurement, labour and social security – European legislation is implemented at national level and the discretion allowed by the directives may lead to the creation of unintended barriers and blockages. Groups of relevant officials within the Baltic Sea Region should coordinate their work to ensure that the Region’s governments align implementation to avoid such blockages. This will remove barriers, or avoid building new barriers, to trade, labour mobility, transport links and enhanced environmental protection. All such coordination would be completely voluntary and would remain entirely within EU legislation.

Report: [This Action has not yet been initiated]

  “Develop integrated maritime governance structures in the Baltic Sea Region”

The implementation of a large number of the maritime actions detailed in pillars 1 to 4 will require strengthened internal coordination within Member States in the Baltic Sea Region, as well as cross-border networks between these integrated maritime functions. Based on the Communication on Maritime Governance of June 2008, the European Commission would recommend that Member States develop such mechanisms, including appropriate stakeholder consultation frameworks. (Deadline for progress review: 31 December 2010)

Report: Since the adoption of the Commission's Communication "Guidelines on an Integrated Approach to Maritime Policy: Towards Best Practices in Integrated Maritime Governance and Stakeholder Consultation" in 2008, all Baltic countries have taken significant steps to strengthen the internal coordination of sectoral policies, and to develop integrated maritime governance structures; they have developed, or are in the process of developing, maritime strategies.

The Baltic Member States share the latest developments of maritime governance structures in the CBSS Working Group on Maritime Policy that was established in June 2009. The Commission also invites Member States to share their approach to maritime governance on the internet ( http://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/memberstates_en.html ). In addition, the Baltic Sea States Sub-Regional Cooperation (BSSSC) and the Baltic Sea Parliamentary conference (BSPC) have also established structures for cooperation on the development and implementation of the IMP in the Baltic Sea Region.

  “Become a pilot project in implementing the Marine Strategy Framework Directive” and take early action to restore the Baltic Sea.

The Marine Strategy Framework Directive 47 includes the option for a region to be a pilot

project, subject to some eligibility conditions, when the status of a marine region is so critical as to necessitate urgent action. This entails that the European Commission provides supportive action. The recognition of the environmental degradation of the Baltic Sea led to

the adoption of the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP) 48 , which is coherent with the

concept of an early programme of measures required for a pilot project. Therefore, the consideration of supportive action by the Commission should be urgently addressed in the framework of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region. With a view to progress towards the establishment of a pilot project in the Baltic Sea, an important form of "supportive action" already at this stage could be to optimise the use of EU funds having regard to the critical status of the Baltic Sea, thereby securing effective integration of environmental concerns in the real application of sectoral policies, to better address the urgent environmental challenges related to the Baltic Sea, as agreed by the European Council. (Deadline for progress review: 31 December 2010)

Report: This action is not expected to be taken forward unless all Member States of the Baltic Sea region would agree to informing the Commission of a revised timetable for an early implementation of the Directive. There was no agreement to do so in 2010.

  “Encourage the use of Maritime Spatial Planning in all Member States around the Baltic Sea and develop a common approach for cross-border cooperation”

Increased activities in the Baltic Sea lead to competition for limited marine space between sectoral interests, such as shipping and maritime transport, offshore energy, ports development, fisheries and aquaculture in addition to environmental concerns. Maritime Spatial Planning is a key tool for improved decision-making that balances sectoral interests that compete for marine space, and contributes to achieving sustainable use of marine areas to benefit economic development as well as the marine environment. The development of a Maritime Planning System for the Baltic Sea, based on the ecosystem approach, is encouraged at national level as well as common cross-border cooperation for the implementation of the Maritime Spatial Planning in the Baltic Sea following the key common principles set out in the recently adopted Commission's Roadmap for Maritime Spatial Planning. The European

47 Directive 2008/56/EC i of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 June 2008 establishing a

framework for community action in the field of marine environmental policy (Marine Strategy Framework

Directive), OJ L 164, 25/6/2008, p.19).

121 Community and the HELCOM Contracting States have agreed in the context of the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan to develop such an integrated tool, and relevant initiatives are also in

process with VASAB, the Baltic Regional Advisory Council 49 and relevant stakeholders. The

Commission will also launch preparatory actions in the Baltic Sea to test the implementation of Maritime Spatial Planning in a cross-border context in close cooperation with the Baltic Member States. The transnational INTERREG project BaltSeaPlan and the DG MARE project Plan Bothnia are the first key projects in that respect. (Deadline for progress review: to be confirmed)

Report: Increased activities in the Baltic Sea have led to competition for limited marine space between sectoral interests, such as shipping and maritime transport, offshore energy, ports development, fisheries and aquaculture in addition to environmental concerns. Maritime Spatial Planning is a key tool for improved decision-making that balances sectoral interests that compete for marine space, and contributes to achieving sustainable use of marine areas to benefit economic development as well as the marine environment. Since the launch of the Commission's Roadmap for Maritime Spatial Planning in 2008, setting out the key principles for MSP, there has been much progress at the EU level and in Baltic Member States, which has been reported in the Commission Communication "Maritime Spatial Planning in the EU –

Achievements and Future Development" 50 .

The level at which MSP is applied in the Baltic Region is varied and ranges from legally binding MSP in the territorial sea as well as the EEZ to application of MSP in the territorial sea by regional councils or municipalities or no MSP at all. Some Baltic Countries have fully applied MSP; others are taking first steps in developing MSP at national level. The challenge is to ensure a common approach and cooperation between Member States on MSP. To test the implementation of MSP in a cross-border context and to make further progress, a study on cross-border cooperation is ongoing with HELCOM as lead partner and partners from other MS institutions involved. This "Plan Bothnia" study is supported by the European Commission as a preparatory action in the Baltic Sea.

Cross-border cooperation is encouraged through the HELCOM and VASAB activities and relevant INTERREG projects. In 2007, HELCOM agreed on a recommendation for the development of broad-scale marine spatial planning principles in the Baltic Sea area, including among others the joint development of common principles and consultation of jointly concerning actions. In a VASAB ministers conference (Oct. 2009) MSP guidelines were agreed. They acknowledged that Maritime Spatial Planning is a joint priority of all the cooperating countries around the Baltic Sea, together with urban development, aimed at establishing territorial cohesion of all the Baltic Sea Region and Europe. As mentioned above, HELCOM and VASAB are working together to establish a joint MSP platform and common, shared principles for MSP. HELCOM and VASAB are taking a prominent role in promoting MSP in the Region together with other stakeholders, by forming a joint working group on MSP. The group has agreed on a joint set of MSP principles for the Baltic Sea.

INTERREG projects help BSR countries to develop good know-how of MSP in the Region. The ongoing BaltSeaPlan project brings together the key MSP players throughout the Baltic Sea Region and offers the chance to create a joint understanding of the necessary instruments

49 The main aim of the BS Regional Advisory Council is to advise the European Commission and Member States

on matters relating to management of the fisheries in the Baltic Sea.

50 Maritime Spatial Planning in the EU – Achievements and Future Development, COM(2010) 771 i of

17.12.2010.

and processes for a successful MSP. BaltSeaPlan builds on the results of projects like BaltCoast, Balance, Coastman, EWW and PlanCoast. The spatial data describing the marine environment and sea-use has improved considerably due to these projects but the principles for harmonising spatial data and the systems for managing this data are still missing.

  “Develop and complete Land-based Spatial Planning”

This action is of key importance in ensuring coherence between actions and maintaining an integrated approach. Without a clear picture of the Region, and an awareness of sensitive areas, population and economic pressures and other factors, sustainable development is not

feasible. Land-based spatial planning is already underway, led by VASAB 51 , and this

initiative should be strengthened, in coordination with maritime spatial planning, and completed. The VASAB Long-Term Perspective for the Territorial Development of the Baltic

Sea Region 52 is a first contribution to that and should be taken into account by other priority

coordinators with regard to spatial objectives, conditions and impacts of their actions (VASAB; Deadline for progress review: to be confirmed)

Report: The major contribution to the development of land-based spatial planning was the elaboration of the “Long-Term Perspective for the Territorial Development of the Baltic Sea Region” (LTP). The LTP was adopted by the VASAB 7th Conference of Ministers responsible for Spatial Planning and Development of the Baltic Sea Region in October 2009 in Vilnius. The LTP is in line with the Territorial Agenda of the EU and it complements the EU BSR Strategy with regard to more detailed objectives and actions concerning territorial cohesion and development of the Baltic Sea Region. The LTP concentrates on issues which require transnational solutions such as urban networking across borders and urban-rural cooperation, improving external and internal accessibility as well as development of maritime spatial planning.

As part of the implementation process of the EU BSR Strategy, the LTP is currently being implemented through a number of short-medium and long-term actions together with other stakeholders of the Region.

Examples of actions are:

o VASAB’s 7th Conference of Ministers responsible for Spatial Planning and Development in October 2009 adopted the Vilnius Declaration which noted the importance given to land-based and maritime spatial planning in the EUSBSR and considered the LTP as a contribution to it and to further development of spatial planning in the Region, and confirmed that VASAB will continue this work.

o VASAB’s Expert and Stakeholder Meeting on Demographic Trends and Labour

Market Development was held on 8 June 2010 in Kaunas, leading to political

recommendations.

o VASAB’s Expert Workshop on Urban-Rural Partnerships in the Baltic Sea Region

was held on 21 September 2010, Minsk, Belarus, discussing further steps in

developing the urban-rural partnership concept.

51 VASAB - Vision and Strategies Around the Baltic Sea – is an intergovernmental network of 11 countries of

the Baltic Sea Region promoting cooperation on spatial planning and development in the Baltic Sea Region.

52 Adopted by the Ministers responsible for Spatial, Planning and Development of the Baltic Sea Region

countries in October 2009 in Vilnius.

o VASAB’s Annual Conference “Integrated Approach to Spatial Development of

Europe – Meaning of Territorial Cohesion” was held on 7-8 February 2011 in Warsaw to assess the progress achieved recently in advancing territorial cohesion in the Baltic Sea Region (BSR), to raise awareness of the BSR becoming a model region for territorial cohesion and to offer BSR as a testing ground for implementation of

TA2020 provisions.

o Influencing and using a number of transnational INTERREG projects such as

BaltSeaPlan, Eco-Region, New Bridges, Baltmet Promo, TransBaltic and Rail Baltica

Growth Corridor.

o Participation in the Eco-Region – a Baltic 21 Lighthouse project on sustainable development.

o Closer cooperation with the Council of Baltic Sea States in order to have better

coordinated implementation of the LTP across various sectors of the economy of the

Baltic Sea Region countries.

o Preparation of an application for an ESPON project on developing a spatial

monitoring system for the BSR.

o Presentation and discussion of LTP results on accessibility at the Transport Quality

Forum of the BSR Programme’s Annual Conference in Jyväskylä.

  "Strengthening multi-level governance, place-based spatial planning and sustainable development"

The action looks to establish dialogue amongst actors at all levels of governance in the Baltic Sea Region (a Baltic Dialogue) in order to consolidate findings and disseminate good methods and experiences. The aim of this dialogue is to ensure the involvement of all levels of governance, including the European Commission, national ministries and authorities, local/regional authorities, macro-regional organisations, financial institutions, VASAB and HELCOM. A second component is to work with showcases building on the Regions’ special field of expertise, spatial (strategic) planning and water management, and through this work establish good examples and methods that allow generalisation. A third component is a "Local signal panel" enabling the Priority Areas and Flagship Projects the possibility to reach all levels of governance. This local panel would make it possible for all actors involved in the Strategy to easily and rapidly ask a question or put forward a suggestion and get a "signal" back from the local/regional level (Deadline for progress review: to be confirmed).

Report: An application has been made to the Baltic Sea Programme to address three of our goals, i.e. to present two showcases, to build a dialogue forum also involving local and regional actors and to create a local signal panel. Cooperation has been established with PA 1 and an outline of regional and local perspectives for that area has been presented. The next step is to approach all Priority Areas to have a discussion on how a multi-level governance approach can be included in the PA and which of the Flagship Projects are most relevant. Presentations have been made to HELCOM (at the idea stage), CBSS, VASAB, the Union of Baltic Cities and the Baltic Sea Commission.

At the end of 2010, an agreement was signed between the Regional Councils in Västerbotten and Kalmar and the Sida Baltic Sea Unit was signed. Support for the multi-level governance approach is given by the Swedish Government and relevant national authorities.

To simplify the communication, INVOLVE has been introduced as a short name for this horizontal action about multi-level governance, place-based spatial planning and sustainable development. It’s about involving local/regional levels together with national and EU levels in the process, but also about involving local and regional aspects at all EUSBSR levels.

The work with Baltic Dialogue will be developed. Examples of important actors to contact are the European Commission, ministries, national authorities, associations of local/regional authorities, macro-regional organisations, financial institutions, VASAB, HELCOM and other relevant pan-Baltic or European organisations.

To fulfil the EUSBSR objectives, a strong political commitment is important. To reach this on local/regional levels, there are two important components – willingness and ability. Willingness is built on an understanding of the EUSBSR concept and a belief that this is of benefit for my municipality/region. Ability is dependent on resources, tools, the regulatory framework, etc. This is an important task not only for this horizontal action, but also for all involved – to spread such an understanding and belief, and to support the local/regional ability. In the longer run, the vision is to define one multi-level showcase within each and every Priority Area.

Other objectives include:

• Creation of a “local signal panel”.

• Local/regional EUSBSR analyses in municipalities/regions in the BSR. Inventory

and analysis of ongoing activities contributing to the EUSBSR objectives as well as an analysis of how the EUSBSR influences/implicates the municipality/region

and consequently the need for further activities.

• External analysis/evaluation and innovative documentation of the showcase’s

working methods.

• State-of-the-art analysis of policy-relevant studies of multi-level governance in the

BSR. Survey of multi-level governance processes already in place in the BSR. Elaboration of a methodology for empirical identification and evaluation of patterns and processes of MLG. Development of a process framework (provisional

model) for operationalising and analysing multi-level governance.

• Manual for practical designers of multi-level governance structures to avoid

pitfalls and to have clear orientations for the development of multi-level

governance.

• Policy recommendations in order to create a better context for the dissemination of

multi-level governance.

• Training material and pilot training at partner countries; e-training could be used.

  “Transform successful pilot and demonstration projects into full-scale actions”

This knowledge has been gained through projects financed by EU, national, regional funds or private funds. For example, such projects have been / are being implemented under the umbrella of HELCOM, Baltic 21, the Nordic Council of Ministers, partnerships in the framework of the Northern Dimension etc. Under the ‘Baltic Sea Region’ transnational programme which is part of the ‘territorial cooperation’ objective of the ERDF, some projects are also supported. The potential of this transnational programme, which already covers the Baltic macro-region, should be maximised. (Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

Report: This Action has not yet been initiated.

  “Use research as a base for policy decisions” through common research programmes in the Baltic Sea Region.

To achieve the objectives of the Strategy (including restoring the Baltic Sea environment, adapting to climate change, developing sustainable fisheries, agriculture and tourism or establishing common spatial planning), there is a need for actions and measures by all countries in many different sectors. Often these are very expensive, and it is necessary to prioritise. Applied (or policy-linked) research with participations from all countries in the Baltic Sea Region can provide the necessary data for such decisions to be made. The Baltic

Nest decision support system 53 and the BONUS Joint Baltic Sea Research and Development

Programme are among the most important, together with the planned research programme on

costs for no actions (a Baltic “Stern” report 54 ). In particular, the network of funding

organisations established through BONUS could be expanded and used also for other common research activities, such as those supported by the Nordic Council of Ministers. (Deadline: to be determined)

Report: DG RTD: BONUS was adopted by the European Parliament and Council on 22 September 2010 (Decision 862/2010/EU). It will be implemented under Article 185 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (formerly Article 169 of the TEC), which provides for the participation of the Union in research and development programmes undertaken by several Member States. Based on previous work undertaken within the framework of the BONUS ERA-Net and BONUS ERA-Net Plus initiatives (2003-10), BONUS brings together all eight Baltic Sea Member States in a joint research effort to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the Baltic Sea Region's environmental research programming. By implementing a policy-driven, fully-integrated joint research programme, based on extensive stakeholder consultations, BONUS will provide concrete scientific outputs facilitating the implementation of ecosystem-based management of environmental issues in the Baltic Sea area while contributing to the establishment and structuring of the ERA in the Baltic.

In 2010 BONUS intensified its links with the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region (EUSBSR), and opened a dialogue with the DG REGIO and Interact Programme (Turku) in regards to building further on the existing synergies.

Broadening of the BONUS Programme’s funding base was a key priority in 2010 and initial steps were taken towards involving innovation funding agencies, and in particular the EUSBSR Flagship Project BSR Stars; this dialogue is continuing in 2011.

53 Developed at the Baltic Nest Institute www.balticnest.org.

54 The ‘Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change’ is a report released in October 2006 by the

economist Lord Stern of Brentford for the British government. It discusses the effect of climate change and global warming on the world economy in particular by comparing the costs of actions compared to the costs of no action.

   “Ensure fast broadband connection for rural areas” using local solutions to include the rural communities in the communication networks.

This action should be combined with initiatives to support internet use, for example free access at official buildings or free internet support for basic services. Support for internet use should include assistance to less advantaged social groups with low income and low education, with actions aimed at supporting digital literacy and ICT training, including fiscal or other incentives aimed at favouring PC ownership, including the enterprise replacement of PCs with portable devices with the aim being to adopt different work patterns that would favour a better integration of work and family life. (Deadline: to be determined)

Report: Digital technologies have a key role to play in improving people's daily lives, for example, in increasing consumer choice and providing better access to information, entertainment and other services. Although Europe has the highest average levels of broadband penetration worldwide (24.8%), it has far from the best networks, and take-up varies considerably. Only 1-2% of Europeans have a fast fibre-based internet, compared to 12% in Japan and 15% in South Korea. EU consumers also pay higher prices for those highspeed connections compared to Japanese or Koreans.

With the aim of closing the gap, the Commission presented an ambitious Digital Agenda for Europe focusing on the 21st century technologies and online services that will enable Europe to boost job creation, promote economic prosperity and improve the daily lives of EU citizens and businesses in a wide variety of ways. The Digital Agenda has set the following targets for broadband: by 2013, broadband coverage for all EU citizens and, by 2020, fast broadband coverage at 30 Megabits per second for all EU citizens, with at least half of European households subscribing to broadband access at 100 Megabits per second. Fast and ultra-fast internet access will play a central role in economic recovery and in providing a platform to support innovation throughout the economy, as electricity and transport did in the past.

In order to further boost the growth of innovative wireless broadband services, there is a need for a better coordination of the radio spectrum management. Meeting the targets set by the Europe 2020 strategy and the Digital Agenda, including the 100% broadband coverage objective, can only be done by a mix of technologies – fixed and wireless. Efficient and coordinated use of the wireless spectrum will be key to ensuring the 100% coverage target by extending broadband to remote and sparsely populated areas. It is necessary to develop a comprehensive policy, based on a mix of technologies focusing on two parallel goals: on the one hand, to guarantee universal broadband coverage, both fixed and wireless, and over time to foster the deployment and take-up of ultra-fast broadband.

To this end, the Commission adopted the broadband package on 20 September 2010 (the Broadband Communication, the NGA Recommendation and Spectrum Policy Programme), which will provide a common framework for the deployment of ultra-fast broadband internet in the European Union and meet the Europe 2020 and the Digital Agenda targets. These three documents along with the revised framework for e-Communications and the Community Guidelines for the Application of State Aid Rules in Relation to Rapid Deployment of Broadband Networks make up the Community level contribution to ensuring Europe has a world-class internet infrastructure to compete in the world economy.

Member States are vital when it comes to the implementation of the Europe 2020 and the Digital Agenda targets. Thus all Member States should have operational broadband plans/strategies, which should take a long-term and balanced view of the cost and benefits of early investment in and roll-out of ultra-fast internet, spectrum allocation and licensing agreements. The plans should also give clear guidance on the uptake of EU broadband funds and EIB instruments, which should aim to unlock the financing for the higher-risk infrastructure projects.

   “Define and implement the Baltic Sea basin component of the European Marine Observation Data etwork (EMOD ET) and improve socio-economic data.”

Marine data – geological, physical, chemical and biological – collected largely by public institutions, are still fragmented, of uncertain quality and difficult to assemble into coherent pictures of the entire Baltic Sea basin. The Commission has proposed a European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNET). As a preparatory action of this initiative, a first version of sea basin-scale map layers of Baltic geology (sediments, geohazards, mineral resources) and broad-scale marine habitats (building on the work of the BALANCE project) was to be ready by 2010. The Commission has also developed a database on data for maritime sectors and coastal regions that constitute a first step towards developing Baltic Sea basinwide socio-economic indicators. (Lead: Poland tbc. Deadline: to be determined)

Report: Marine data – geological, physical, chemical and biological – collected largely by public institutions, are still fragmented, of uncertain quality and difficult to assemble into coherent pictures of the entire Baltic Sea basin. In order to (1) increase the efficiency of all those who work with marine data – industry, public authorities and research bodies, (2) stimulate innovation and growth, and (3) reduce uncertainties in the past, present and future behaviour of the sea, the "marine knowledge 2020" initiative was launched in the autumn of 2010. As a preparatory action of this initiative, a first version of sea basin-scale map layers of Baltic geology (sediments, coastline, sedimentation rates, geohazards, mineral resources) is being finalised. Input data preparation is largely complete, threshold testing is well underway and draft models are being worked out now. The portal providing access to these layers is now on-line.

EMODNET Geology’s substrate and sediment maps are crucial inputs to the physical habitat model that is also being developed under the marine knowledge initiative. Other inputs include seabed salinity, energy (both oceanographic wave and tidal models, as well as a high resolution fetch-based wave model), stratification and oxygenation levels. All of these layers are available through the EUSeaMap portal.

In addition, HELCOM has agreed to adopt the physical classes mapped for EUSeaMap as the high-level structure for the EUNIS habitat classification, which will be a substantial improvement to the way Baltic habitats are organised within EUNIS. This contribution from EUSeaMap will be a critical part of HELCOM's update of the Red List, which is now underway and due to be completed in 2014. The HELCOM will add detailed, biologicallydistinct habitats to the high-level structure defined by EUSeaMap’s modelling of physical variables .

The Commission has also developed a database on data for maritime sectors and coastal regions that constitute a first step towards developing Baltic Sea-basin-wide socio-economic indicators.

  “Build a regional identity” at the level of the wider region based on a common vision.

This would involve opinion surveys and marketing campaigns, awareness and visibilityraising exercises, promotion of cultural heritage linked to the shared Baltic Sea and the preparation of a common history book. Possibilities could include creating annual prizes for the best projects promoting the Region or otherwise supporting the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region, or applying jointly (as the Baltic Sea Region) for the organisation of a major world or European-level sporting event. The drafting of a common history book could be considered as there is already a strong interest by the ‘Academia Baltica’, an institution for research and adult education based in Kiel (Germany). (Lead: BaltMet; Deadline: to be determined)

Report: Naturally it is difficult to measure or assess the “level” of regional identity existing. Policy roundtables arranged by the horizontal action leader and discussions at the EUSBSR annual forum with various stakeholders have nevertheless helped identify the key issues to be tackled. The first Policy Roundtable was organised in Vilnius on 31 May, 2010 in parallel with the Baltic Development Forum's Annual Summit. The second Policy Roundtable of BaltMet Promo was on 14 October, 2010 in Tallinn, back-to-back with the First Annual Forum of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region. The following Policy Roundtable was scheduled for May 30th 2011 in Berlin. The fourth Policy Roundtable will be parallel with the Baltic Development Forum’s Summit in Gdansk on 24-27 October, 2011. A basic lesson learned is that there are at least two basic approaches to the question of regional identity – identity as a brand and identity as a feeling of belonging. Both can be developed, but have to be based on existing common goods of the BSR and cannot be imposed from above.

A common understanding is that both are long-term tasks that have no particular deadline, as identities are ever-evolving. Finding common definitions of a regional identity and its prerequisites is important work in order to achieve a common vision that is anchored among as many stakeholders as possible, as called for in the EUSBSR Action Plan. This work will continue in through policy roundtables. Understandably, discussions are more focused in terms of branding than a feeling of belonging. Developing and finding clear ownership for the discussions on feelings of belonging is the greatest challenge of the HAL.

List of concrete outputs/results

The BaltMet Promo project (INTERREG IVB funded) has advanced in identifying existing common goods from a branding point of view, and a first result of this process is the Baltic Sea Region Investors Guide.

As a complement to the situation analysis of place branding and place promotion efforts in the Baltic Sea Region conducted by the HAL last year, the HAL has also collected information on existing transnational projects in the Region with relevance for regional branding and identity. These are listed at http://www.baltmetpromo.net/public/branding.html#horizontal. Discussions on how to translate these project results into policy and lessons learned for the good of all stakeholders have started, and without the existence of the Horizontal Action this would not have taken place, as the projects are dispersed throughout different funding programmes and sectoral initiatives.

Cross-cutting cooperation

The HAL has established a database of actors with relevance for regional branding in order to be able to request more coordinated reporting on this issue. Within the strategy structures, HAL invites PA 7, PA 8 and PA 13 to policy roundtables, and vice-versa HAL is invited to discussions within concerned PAs. Notably, branding is included as an element in the starting innovation Flagship Project StarDust, developing towards the BSR Stars Programme, and this provides a long-term perspective for developing branding as a support tool for transnational innovation cooperation.

In terms of cooperation with NCPs, the HAL points out that it could be worthwhile considering asking them to identify key stakeholders in national ministries and agencies. Help with identifying relevant contacts in DGs would also be welcomed, e.g. from DG COMM and DG EAC. In view of the deepened and more coherent analysis available on the issue of regional identity, as a result of EUSBSR efforts, the HAL would suggest an all-round modification of the wording of the Horizontal Action Regional Identity so that it better reflects the identified tasks necessary.

Process

The HAL points out that the very valuable process started within the BaltMet Promo project concerning the identification of BSR common goods from a branding point of view, risks being cut short because of the discrepancy between the necessary long-term approach of identity building and the relatively short-term approach of project financing. While the ultimate goal of developing a BSR branding approach is to establish it as an independent element of profitable commercial activities, it is clear that this cannot be done within just a couple of years and thus needs sustained project financing for some time to come (see next steps).

Concerning the process of advancing a feeling of belonging, an established forum is still at the stage of emerging. European technical assistance financing for establishing such a forum would be very useful.

Next steps

The HAL engages in coordination between and evaluation of branding and identity projects in the Region through inter alia joint meetings, seminars, a common web space, and project development advice for projects contributing to the Horizontal Action.

The HAL will continue to advance discussions on both regional identity in terms of branding as well as a feeling of belonging. The HAL will continue efforts to bring together outputs from relevant transnational projects for learning for all stakeholders. For regional branding this will take place within the established policy roundtables. In order to ensure their continuation, as well as concrete output in terms of identifying common goods for regional branding and starting to develop the brand, the HAL is submitting a new project proposal to the Baltic Sea Programme 4th Call called Baltmet Brand-Id. The project will have a strong branding and identity approach including a Regional Branding Strategy and Branding Platform and an inclusive stakeholder approach bringing together all the other EUSBSR projects that have identity and branding aspects on their agenda. To solidify the approach to regional identity in terms of a feeling of belonging, the HAL will explore the opportunities of technical assistance.

  Support for sustainable development of the fisheries areas” under the European

Fisheries Fund (EFF) Operational Programmes and the Community FAR-NET network 55 .

This is expected to assist in improving the quality of life of the Baltic coastal communities by promoting the protection of the environment, regenerating and developing coastal hamlets and villages with fisheries activities, and protecting and enhancing the natural and architectural heritage. These programmes should also contribute to favourable conditions for the development of sustainable tourism of the Baltic Sea coastal areas, in particular by promoting eco-tourism. It is estimated that ca. 60-70 local fisheries groups will be created in the Baltic Sea Region which could potentially implement the action during the 2007-13 period. (Lead: each Member State network for fisheries areas, in cooperation with the Community FAR- NET network; Deadline for progress review: to be determined)

130 Report: DG MARE: The new Priority Axis 4 of the European Fisheries Fund provides support for the sustainable development of fisheries areas. In particular, it supports measures to promote economic diversification (tourism, food, renewable energy, etc.) and an improved quality of life in areas affected by a decline in fishing activities. An important innovation in the implementation of Axis 4 is the emphasis on the territorial approach, which encourages a focus on specific areas and seeks to mobilise local actors from all sectors: public, private and civil society, to work together as “groups” to design and implement integrated local development strategies. The European Commission established the European Network for Fisheries Areas (FARNET) to assist in the implementation of Axis 4 of the EFF. The FARNET Support Unit supports and guides Fisheries Local Action Groups (FLAGs) in devising and implementing their local development strategies and acts as a platform for networking between fisheries areas.

It is estimated that around 125 FLAGs will be created in the Baltic Sea Region. These groups are also encouraged to engage in interregional and transnational cooperation. The total public investment by Baltic Member States under Axis 4 (EFF + other public contributions) for the period 2007-13 amounts to €452 million, which is almost half of the total EU public investment under Axis 4 (this figure also includes some inland FLAGs and the North Sea FLAGs for the MS that cover both the Baltic and the North Sea).

All FLAGs around the Baltic are expected to be selected by the 2nd half of 2011. In seven Baltic countries, 116 FLAGs have already been selected and approved by the Managing Authority of the EFF Operational Programme. In Poland, 26 FLAGs have been selected and another 12 FLAGs are expected to be approved in a second selection round. In Lithuania, the process of selecting the FLAGs is currently being finalised. Groups in DK, FIN, DE, SE, EE and LV have already started implementing projects. In some Scandinavian countries, where the rural and the fisheries areas overlap, LEADER local action groups have taken on direct responsibility for the management and delivery of Axis 4 funds (with clear demarcation between the funds).

Some delays in implementing Axis 4 have occurred due to the novelty of the approach and the lack of experience in many MS at the level of both the MAs and stakeholders. Support and resources are needed at all levels (EU, national and local) to put in place a system so radically different from past programmes.

A Baltic Sea Network of EFF Managing Authorities and the FLAGs is being created with the support of DG MARE. The main objective will be to foster transnational cooperation under Axis 4 of the EFF (sustainable development of fisheries areas) among the FLAGs in fisheriesdependent areas of the Baltic Sea Region. This cooperation is expected to result in joint projects contributing to the implementation of the EUSBSR.

Annex: HELCOM actions and corresponding actions under the Action Plan for the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region 56

Lead countries / Contact persons EU actions HELCOM actions

EU contacts HELCOM contacts

Priority area 1: To reduce nutrient inputs to the sea to acceptable levels; coordinated by Poland and Finland

Finland: Ulla Kaarikivi-Laine

Poland: Katarzyna Biedrzycka

Strategic actions

Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM Implement actions to reduce On-going activities Secretariat nutrients”

mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi Updating and further development of a set of full implementation of: core eutrophication indicators and their

and - key Directives relating to publishing on the HELCOM website by 2013 to Maria Laamanen, HELCOM eutrophication enable up-to-date provision of information on Secretariat the eutrophication status of the Baltic Sea

maria.laamanen@helcom.fi - actions in the HELCOM Baltic Sea (CORESET). Action Plan

Implementation of the HELCOM project to review and revise the environmental targets (TARGREV project) and country-wise provisional nutrient reduction targets (in cooperation with BNI) during 2010-2012 based on the integrated thematic assessment on eutrophication, results of the Fifth HELCOM Pollution Load Compilation and EMEP data.

Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Promote measures and practices On-going activities Secretariat which reduce nutrient losses from

mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi farming and address eutrophication” Work in the HELCOM Baltic Agriculture/Environmental Forum established in

  • full implementation of the Nitrates 2010 and Water Framework Directives,

132

and the new Common Agricultural - targeting of measures and investments to Policy Cross-Compliance most optimal installations with biggest requirement to establish buffer potential environmental benefit and also strips along water courses from areas with high nutrient impact to the

  • additional Rural Development Baltic Sea measures to maximise fertiliser - review of HELCOM List of agricultural hot efficiency or achieve nutrient spots, represented by both point and diffuse recycling sources.

based on: List of priority installations in agricultural - identification of all the intensively sector in Belarus that are contributing to used agricultural land of the whole transboundary pollution of the Baltic Sea catchment area to focus on these adopted at the 2010 HELCOM Moscow areas first Ministerial Meeting

  • consideration of further measures

needed through environmental or Conduction and participation in various projects:

agricultural policies HELCOM BALTHAZAR Project 2009-2012:

  • in Leningrad and Kaliningrad Regions as well as the City of St.Petersburg:

    implementation of on-farm pilot projects in consideration of environmental benefit to the Baltic Sea (re. BSAP)

Baltic COMPASS Project (Comprehensive Policy Actions and Investments in Sustainable Solutions in Agriculture in the Baltic Sea region):

  • implementing large scale on-farm pilot investments in Baltic Sea coastal states and in Belarus, based on identified most feasible and efficient technologies and management measures (spatially and geographically)

All Member States Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Full implementation of the Water On-going activities

Secretariat Framework Directive in order to River Basin Management Plans and their

mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi maximize the environmental benefits Operational Programmes that are relevant for the for the Baltic Sea” watershed of the Baltic Sea were taken into

  • measures to obtain good ecological account while elaborating National

status in all water bodies, including Implementation Programmes for the Baltic Sea

coastal waters, by year 2015 Action Plan.

  • full implementation (including reporting) of the Water Framework HELCOM Agriculture and Environment Forum Directive, together with the Nitrate serves for exchange of experience between the Directive and the Urban Waste Contracting Parties on application of WFD with Water Directive, in line with the regards to prevention of pollution from objectives of the Marine Strategy agriculture. Framework Directive for 2020

    Follow-up of national work on reaching the requirements of UWWT Directive and support to facilitation of compliance with the stricter HELCOM requirements.

    HELCOM participation in PURE (Project on Urban Reduction of Eutrophication) project

    • Increased phosphorous removal, according to the HELCOM Recommendation 28E/5, in five waste water treatment plants

    Need for further action

    Review of and transfer of know-how on waste water treatment technologies that are available in the region for reaching more stringent HELCOM effluent standards (both chemical and biological)

Cooperative actions

Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Establish and restore more wetlands” On-going activities Secretariat

mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi - to recycle the nutrients and to mitigate The HELCOM Joint Comprehensive floods Environmental Action Programme (JCP)

The wetlands should be established includes four transboundary hot spots which where long term effects can be expected address management of coastal wetlands and the considering the different climatic BSAP includes an endorsed list of examples for conditions, the sensitivity for reducing nutrient inputs which includes eutrophication etc. establishment of wetlands.

ARTWEI Project

  • addressing priority measures in selected coastal lagoons and transit water areas in the Baltic Sea Area

Needed action

Further support to recover transboundary hot spots represented by coastal lagoons by 2012 when the JCP is expected to be implemented.

HELCOM could initiate a joint activity for establishment and restoration of wetlands. The initiative would have potential for protection of biodiversity as well.

Maria Laamanen, HELCOM “Set up the BO US 185 (169) scheme” On-going activities

Secretariat

maria.laamanen@helcom.fi - in order to have a sustainable research BONUS EEIG has observer status in HELCOM, framework (this action is underway and and there is cooperation between the two

expected to be implemented from the organisations.

end of 2011/early 2012) Participation by the HELCOM Secretariat in the

drafting process of the Strategic Research Agenda of BONUS with the aim to ensure that research needs stemming from the implementation of the ecosystem approach and the BSAP will be sufficiently covered.

HELCOM’s ecosystem approach to management

of human activities and the Baltic Sea Action

Plan have set a continuous demand for scientific

information supporting policy making and hence

on-going cooperation also with the Baltic Sea

area scientific community.

“Facilitate cross-sectoral policy On-going activities

oriented dialogue” HELCOM Agriculture and Environment Forum

  • integration of agricultural, - facilitating actions to reduce nutrient inputs environmental and rural development from agriculture through dialogue between issues national environmental and agricultural authorities

    HELCOM’s participation in Baltic COMPASS Project: - forum for discussion and adaptation of environmental and agricultural interests and policies on the regional level

Flagship Projects

Sweden Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Remove phosphates in detergents in On-going activities

Swedish Chemicals Agency Secretariat countries where this is not yet the case mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi as recommended by HELCOM Baltic Implementation of HELCOM Recommendation Åsa Thors ( Asa.Thors@kemi.se ) Sea Action Plan” 28E/7 on Measures aimed at the substitution of polyphosphates (phosphorus) in detergents.

Bo Nyström (Bo.Nystrom@kemi.se) - a timetable to be prepared for the early phasing-out in the Baltic Sea of use of

phosphates in detergents Country programmes and measures for laundry

(FAST TRACK) 31 Dec. 2012 detergents were presented at the HELCOM Ministerial Meeting in 2010 and will be

Questions and Answers on Phosphates implemented in accordance with national in Detergents can be found on the timetables, and in all cases not later than by website of the Swedish Chemical 2015. Discussion on inclusion of also dishwasher Agency detergents will be carried out in accordance with

Expected finalization of the project is EU process.

June 2011 A proposal for an EU Regulation has been put forward by EC to ban phosphorus in laundry detergents by 2013.

P-containing detergents in laundry are banned for

household use in LV (2010), SE (2009) and

voluntarily phased out in DE (since 1980-s) and

FI (since early 1990-s). P-containing dishwasher

detergents are banned in household use in SE

from 2011

Sweden Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Cleaner waste water” On-going activities

Swedish Environment Protection Agency Secretariat - identifying, building / upgrading HELCOM participation in the PURE Project

Anne Andersson, mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi priority Waste Water Treatment Plants (Project on Urban Reduction of Eutrophication)

(anne.andersson@naturvardsverket.se) and around the Baltic Sea (for example in to promote the implementation of the stricter

Lotta Ruokanen, HELCOM Neman and Sovetsk), taking into HELCOM requirements for Urban Waste Water Secretariat account the HELCOM requirements to Treatment Plants (UWWTPs) ( HELCOM lotta.ruokanen@helcom.fi remove phosphorous and nitrogen Recommendation 28E/5 on Municipal - functioning of existing Waste Water wastewater treatment) (including several Baltic Treatment Plants to be improved, taking municipalities as well as Belarus).

into account the HELCOM on-going

process List of priority installations in waste water

treatment sector in Belarus that are contributing to transboundary pollution of the Baltic Sea was adopted at the 2010 HELCOM Moscow Ministerial Meeting

Follow-up of national work on reaching the requirements of UWWT Directive and support to facilitation of compliance with the stricter HELCOM requirements

Need for action

Review of waste water treatment technologies that are available in the region for reaching more stringent HELCOM effluent standards (both chemical and biological) – partly on-going within PURE

Development of List of “Green Spots” consisting of WWTPs that are in compliance with requirements of HELCOM Recommendation 28E/5

tbd “Analyse results of pilot actions”

  • funded by the Baltic Sea Region programme and LIFE to recommend “best practices”

(FAST TRACK) 30 June 2010

Sweden Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Putting best practices in agriculture On-going activities

Sindre Langaas (sindre.langaas@lrf.se) Secretariat into work – Baltic DEAL” mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi Support and follow-up the activities of

Denmark - knowledge and promotion of how to and have a nutrient-balanced agriculture and - Baltic COMPASS Project

Leif Raun (lfr@landscentret.dk) Kaj Granholm, HELCOM of how to reduce the leaching from - Baltic DEAL Project– to address

Finland Secretariat agriculture into the Baltic Sea through individual farm level the rivers

Germany kaj.granholm@helcom.fi Support to the Baltic Sea Farmers Prize - improving the extent and quality of (developed and promoted by WWF and BFFE)

national agrienvironment services and take it into account when developing the concept

related information activities targeting of “Green List of Farms”.

farmers and their advisors

Need for further action:

Deadline: 31 December 2013 Based on the outcomes of the HELCOM

Thematic Assessment of Eutrophication in the Baltic Sea and relevant inputs from the HELCOM Pollution Load Compilation work, to prioritize measures within areas with high nutrient impact to the Baltic Sea

Finland Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Assessment of regional nutrient On-going activities

Ministry of Environment Secretariat pollution load and identification of mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi priority projects to reduce nutrient For Belarus: within the Baltic COMPASS and

Kristiina Isokallio PURE Projects

( kristiina.isokallio@ymparisto.fi ) and

inputs from Belarus to the Baltic Sea” - activities in Belarus to build capacity in

Laura Sajonmaa Kaj Forsius, HELCOM

  • in the context of the Northern

( Laura.Saijonmaa@ymparisto.fi ) Secretariat

Dimension Environmental Partnership nutrient runoff assessing on a farm and river basins scale, i.e. through training,

kaj.forsius@helcom.fi Deadline: 31 December 2011 international workshops and investments in continuous water quality monitoring

equipment

Support to the project on assessment of transboundary nutrient loads originating from Belarus (led by the Finnish Ministry of Environment)

  • through the list of priority projects in waste water and agricultural fields
  • through PLC data from countries sharing watersheds with Belarus

Priority area 2: To preserve natural zones and biodiversity, including fisheries; coordinated by Germany

Germany: Heike Imhoff

Strategic actions

Maria Laamanen, HELCOM Implement the HELCOM Baltic Sea On-going activities

Secretariat Action Plan” HELCOM Maritime work on alien species (see

maria.laamanen@helcom.fi - specific reference to the Biodiversity further below).

and and Nature Conservation segment, as well as the Maritime Activities segment

Monika Stankiewicz, HELCOM re. the HELCOM Ballast Water Road HELCOM Red List Project (2009-2013) to Secretariat Map & 2004 IMO BWMC develop Red Lists of birds, marine mammals,

monika.stankiewicz@helcom.fi - closely related to implementation and macrophytes, benthic invertebrates and fish and

development of EU policies, including lamprey species, and to update a Red List of

the Common Fisheries Policy Baltic Sea habitats/biotopes by 2013, including finalising a classification system for Baltic Sea

habitats.

HELCOM-VASAB Joint Working Group on Maritime Spatial Planning and testing and applying of the newly adopted common principles for broad scale maritime spatial planning by 2012.

PlanBothnia project for piloting the use of the adopted common principles for broad scale maritime spatial planning.

HELCOM Fisheries and Environmental Forum for the implementation of the fisheries related items of the Baltic Sea Action Plan.

HELCOM SEAL work on the protection of seals in the Baltic Sea.

Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Reduce the negative effects of fishing On-going activities Secretariat on the Baltic ecosystem”

mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi HELCOM Baltic Fisheries and Environmental - additional national measures to Forum.

and minimise the effect of fishing on the

Maria Laamanen, HELCOM marine ecosystems within their

Secretariat territorial waters and for fishing vessels HELCOM has finalised a project in cooperation flying their flag in line with, or more with ASCOBANS to build-up a database on

maria.laamanen@helcom.fi stringent than the existing Community harbour porpoise sightings, by-catches and legislation strandings and now needs to ensure updating of

  • especially for the protection of the the database

critically endangered Baltic harbour

porpoise population Need for actions

Establishment of a project on assessment of impacts of fishing activities within MPAs.

Flagship Projects

Germany Maria Laamanen, HELCOM “Create marine protected areas” On-going activities

Federal Ministry for the Environment, Secretariat - Member States to complete the Implementation of the BSAP and the HELCOM

Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety maria.laamanen@helcom.fi designation of a network of marine Moscow Ministerial Declaration related to the Division KI II 5 protected areas in the Baltic Sea / need to designate further MPAs especially in the

Dörte Ratzmann BSPAs EEZ and to develop management plans and

( doerte.ratzmann@bmu.bund.de ) - adopted and implemented measures for all BSPAs by 2015.

management plans that correspond to the threats towards the species or

habitat they are created to protect HELCOM’s Fisheries and Environmental Forum considers various issues and also measures that

  • designation of the Natura 2000 are under the CFP. network in the Baltic Sea to be taken into account in the context of maritime spatial planning Need for actions
  • Coordination with measures under the To consider joint activities for developing and Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) implementing management plans and measures

(FAST TRACK) for protected areas, including a possible project on evaluating impacts of fisheries in MPAs and

creating a toolbox of measures for management.

HELCOM Monika Stankiewicz, HELCOM “Restrict the introduction of new alien Accomplished work

Sweden Secretariat species by ships”*proposed to be monika.stankiewicz@helcom.fi moved under PA4 Common decision has been reached that ballast Germany water exchange should not be a management and - enforcement of the international option in the Baltic Sea.

Germany leading the work of the Ballast Water Management Convention Correspondence Group: Manfred and by means such as onboard Rolke, BSH treatment and the installation of ballast HELCOM has developed the list of alien species

manfred.rolke@bsh.de water reception facilities in ports with in the Baltic. important traffic flows from and

towards outside the Baltic Sea

  • HELCOM countries agreed in the Joint HELCOM/OSPAR Guidance on voluntary Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP) to ratify ballast water exchange have been agreed for both the Convention possibly by 2010, and incoming (BWM.2/Circ. 14) and outgoing traffic by 2013 at the latest (BWM.2/Circ.22).
  • HELCOM Road Map has been agreed,

focusing e.g. on the ballast water Guidance to distinguish between unacceptable management and risk assessment for high risk scenarios and acceptable low risk inner Baltic voyages scenarios – a risk of spreading of alien species by

  • HELCOM is working on joint OSPAR ships on Intra-Baltic voyages has been adopted / HELCOM guidance on the voluntary by HELCOM.

interim application of ballast water

exchange standards On-going activities

New HELCOM project Pilot risk assessments of

alien species transfer on intra-Baltic ship

voyages has been launched.

Sweden ratified the Convention on 23 November 2009, and the ratification process is on-going in other Baltic Sea countries.

HELCOM / OSPAR / REMPEC Guidance on voluntary ballast water exchange in the high seas by ships to/from Mediterranean agreed by HELCOM and awaiting adoption by other relevant regional commissions

Work is on-going to cover alien species in the HELCOM monitoring and assessment programmes

Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Establish measures to facilitate Accomplished work

Secretariat migration and reproduction of

mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi migratory fish species” Overview of the state of salmon (Salmo salar) and sea trout (Salmo trutta) populations in rivers

Germany Based on a classification and inventory flowing to the Baltic Sea (DG MARE funded of rivers with historic and existing project, started in 2010)

migratory fish species (cf. HELCOM BSAP)

  • national eel management plans are On-going activities

also expected to contribute to the Work within HELCOM Baltic Fisheries and restocking of this species Environmental Forum, in cooperation with ICES e.g. on:

  • strengthening of the knowledge base and information exchange on European eel

Priority area 3: To reduce the use and impact of hazardous substances; coordinated by Sweden

Sweden: Karin Klingspor

Strategic actions

Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Implement actions to reduce On-going activities Secretariat hazardous substances”

mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi Revised HELCOM objective with regard to specific HELCOM BSAP Hazardous hazardous substances (in order to ensure that

Substances segment HELCOM always has the focus on hazardous

  • full implementation of the key substances of most importance/ most Directives and Regulations relating to environmental harm in the region) was adopted as

chemicals a part of HELCOM Moscow Ministerial Declaration ( HELCOM Recommendation 31E/1 )

BALTHAZAR project 2009-2012: - establishment of a prioritized list of landfills

  • supervision of compliance with and other hazardous waste sites and municipal Regulation (EC) 782/2003 i which management schemes with a high risk of transposes the Antifouling Convention hazardous waste pollution to the Baltic Sea; by the International Maritime - pooling of financial resources in cooperation Organisation (IMO) into Community with IFI’s and implementation of pilot projects in law North West Russia;
    • assessment of the hazardous waste management regime and regulatory framework in support of Russian National Implementation Programme for HELCOM BSAP.

    COHIBA project 2009-2011: - identify the most important sources of 11 hazardous substances of special concern, - quantify inputs of the selected substances to the Baltic Sea, - analyze the pathways of the selected substances from production, processes and uses to the marine environment, - develop cost-effective management options to reduce discharges

Cooperative actions

“Restrict the input of hormone-like On-going activities

substances” Was taken into account within revision of

  • analysis of the sources, flows and HELCOM objective with regard to hazardous impacts of pharmaceutical products in substances ( HELCOM Recommendation 31E/1 ) the marine environment

“Assess the need to clean up On-going activities contaminated wrecks and chemical

weapons” Annual reports of Lead country (Denmark) on dumped chemical munitions at sea and HELCOM

  • protect sensitive marine reports from 1994 and 1995, containing thorough ecosystems, taking into account information on the dumping sites as well as

    earlier work carried out by quantity, quality and potential impacts of the HELCOM. chemical munitions in the Baltic Sea

    The 2010 HELCOM Ministerial Meeting established ad hoc Expert Group to update and review the existing information on dumped chemical munitions in the Baltic Sea (HELCOM MUNI).

Maria Laamanen, HELCOM “Continue the research on hazardous On-going activities

Secretariat substances” HELCOM CORESET project develops core

maria.laamanen@helcom.fi - need to improve further the hazardous substances indicators with target levels knowledge basis, including through reflecting good environmental status

the development of the planned

BONUS 185Joint Baltic Sea Work on monitoring of biological effects of Research and Development hazardous substances, e.g. through the BEAST Programme Project (funded from the BONUS Programme)

Need for actions

Further joint monitoring is required and considered within HELCOM in connection with a proposal to establish a project for review of HELCOM’s monitoring programmes

Flagship Projects (the updated list of Flagship Projects is contained in the Action Plan of the EU SBSR from 17.12.2010)

Finland Maria Laamanen, HELCOM "Develop tools and indicators for the Development of tools for biological effects of

Finnish Environment Institute Secretariat assessment of biological effects of hazardous substances is one of the priority maria.laamanen@helcom.fi anthropogenic chemical stress in the actions of the BELCOM BSAP

Kari Lehtonen

( kari.lehtonen@ymparisto.fi ) and

Baltic Sea”

Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM investigating the causality between Secretariat chemical pressure and biological effects

Outcomes of the BEAST project will be taken

mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi at different levels of biological

into account in development of HELCOM

organization CORESET indicators for hazardous substances

The project will also contribute to capacity building and strengthening of network via workshops (BEAST project financed by the Bonus Joint Baltic Sea Research and Development Programme)

Poland “Assess the need to clean up chemical On-going activities

Chief Inspectorate for Environmental weapons” Annual reports of Lead country (Denmark) on

Protection - Activities should encompass dumped chemical munitions at sea and HELCOM

Katarzyna Biedrzycka identification of the current priority reports from 1994 and 1995, containing thorough

( k.biedrzycka@gios.gov.pl ) threats and establishment of the information on the dumping sites as well as costs and benefits of any possible quantity, quality and potential impacts of the

action through agreed research chemical munitions in the Baltic Sea. programmes.

  • This should build on existing

    knowledge and mapping in the On the initiative of Germany and Poland, the

    Baltic Sea. 2010 HELCOM Ministerial Meeting established an ad hoc Expert Group to update and review the

  • The development of major offshore existing information on dumped chemical infrastructure projects should also munitions in the Baltic Sea (HELCOM MUNI) take into account the location of that held its first meeting in 15 November 2010. underwater chemical weapon

    dumping sites

Sweden Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM "Sustainable management of The Project will contribute to the revision of

Secretariat contaminated sediments" HELCOM Guidelines for disposal of dredged

Swedish Geotechnical Institute mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi A guideline and a tool-box for treatment material at sea, including the assessment of

options for beneficial use of dredged material

Göran Holm ( goran.holm@swedgeo.se ) technologies, an assessment and decision support system will be

developed, and field tests to validate and demonstrate treatment methods under various conditions will be performed.

SMOCS project financed by the Baltic Sea Region Programme

Deadline: 16 December 2012

HELCOM Maria Laamanen, HELCOM “Development of HELCOM Core Set HELCOM CORESET Project for the

Secretariat Indicators” (HELCOM CORESET) development of a HELCOM core set of indicators

maria.laamanen@helcom.fi to support regular updating of the and targets (2010-2013) will ensure the necessary

and thematic assessments, which assess cooperation and coordination, and finally also the marine region-wide harmonisation needed to set

Samuli Korpinen, HELCOM whether HELCOMs strategic goals and Baltic Sea specific targets for GES related to

Secretariat ecological objectives have been reached, and whether the hazardous substances and biodiversity

samuli.korpinen@helcom.fi implementation of the Baltic Sea Action Likewise the HELCOM work is carried out Plan has been successful. The indicators within the field of eutrophication

should be fully in line with Good Ecological Status (GES) as defined in the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive, and the ensuing guidelines or criteria

Finland Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Control of Hazardous Substances in HELCOM participates in the COHIBA Project as

Finnish Environment Institute Secretariat the Baltic Sea Region” a partner responsible for communication and mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi dissemination of information.

Ansa Pilke ( ansa.pilke@ymparisto.fi ) Identifying the sources and inputs of 11 hazardous substances and substance

groups which are addressed in the

HELCOM BSAP, and develop The COHIBA approach for screening of sources measures to reduce the load of these of hazardous substances will be tested within the substances. The project also aims at 2

nd phase of Balthazar Project in the Russian

improving knowledge of best practices Federation

and capacity building (COHIBA-

project co-financed by the EU Baltic The Final Conference of the Project will be

Sea Region Programme 2007-13). arranged on 11-12 October 2011 in Helsinki, (Lead: Finnish Environment Institute Finland (SYKE). Deadline for finalisation: 2012)

Germany Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Innovative Management of Follow-up of COHIBA Project

ISI Fraunhofer Institute Secretariat Hazardous Substances in the Baltic mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi Sea Region”, (InnoMaHaz) Not yet started – only at the planning phase

Eve Menger-Krug ( Eve.Menger

Krug@isi.fraunhofer.de ) - mapping sources and evaluating cost-efficiency of measures to a set

of emerging hazardous substances, e.g. pharmaceuticals.

  • innovative measures will be analysed in terms of cost-efficiency and ease of implementation.

This analysis will target selected fields, which have been identified in COHIBA as potential gaps, e.g. import of products (such as textiles), flame retardant use in the building sector or new urban infrastructure concepts for waste, waste water and urban run-off.

The International Chemical Secretariat Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM "Reduce the use of the Substances of Not yet started – only at the planning phase

Per Rosander Secretariat Very High Concern (SVHC) in the

( per.rosander@chemsec.org ) mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi Baltic Sea Region"

 Jerker Ligthart ( jerker@chemsec.org ) aims at bringing forward substances relevant for the environment in the

Baltic Sea, such as the recommendations on hazardous substances made through the Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP) to the REACH candidate list

Sweden Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Make the Baltic Sea Region a lead in This Flagship Project will support the

Swedish Medical Products Agency Secretariat sustainable development for establishment of an expert network and exchange mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi pharmaceuticals” of knowledge on the problem of pharmaceutical

Charlotte Unger establishing a network on contamination of the Baltic marine environment,

( charlotte.unger@mpa.se ) pharmaceuticals with the focus on as decided by the 2010 HELCOM Ministerial sustainable development where good Meeting.

practice and experience are exchanged between people with knowledge of medical products, health and Kick-off meeting of the Flagship Project is environmental aspects within the preliminary planned in second half of 2011 region.

Priority area 4: To become a model region for clean shipping; coordinated by Denmark

Denmark Lolan Eriksson, Chair of

Danish Maritime Authority HELCOM Maritime Group, Ministry of Transport and

Clea Henrichsen( cge@dma.dk ) Communications of Finland

Helle Knudsen ( hkn@dma.dk ) lolan.eriksson@mintc.fi

and

Monika Stankiewicz, HELCOM Secretariat monika.stankiewicz@helcom.fi

Strategic actions

HELCOM is implementing this Implement actions to reduce ship On-going activities

strategic action pollution” Work is well under way.

Additional HELCOM contact: Based on the Maritime Activities

Finland leading the work of the segment in the HELCOM BSAP

All Baltic Sea countries agreed that the Baltic Sea should be designated as a NECA. Joint

Correspondence Group - Jorma - IMO/MARPOL (Annex VI) submission by the HELCOM countries to IMO on Kämäräinen, Finnish Transport introduces even stricter conditions for the Baltic Sea NECA is being finalized, e.g. based

Safety Agency SOx in the Baltic Sea on a HELCOM study on the Baltic NECA

jorma.kamarainen@trafi.fi - IMO/MARPOL (Annex IV) provides economic impact for presentation of a progress

for establishing marine areas as a NOx report in June 2011, further concluding on the

emission control areas submission in November (HELCOM MARITIME 10/2011) and a decision in December 2011.

  • possibility to establish the Baltic Sea as a NOx Emission Control Area (NECA)
  • EU to assess, whether action is required at EU level or specifically within the Baltic Sea Region

Cooperative actions

Flagship Projects

HELCOM “Promote measures to collect ship On-going activities

generated waste Policy framework is in place.

  • enhanced application of HELCOM’s

‘no special-fee’ system for port HELCOM Recommendation 28/10 requires that reception facilities especially for oily ships should not be charged for using port wastes from machinery spaces, sewage reception facilities, under the “no-special-fee”

and garbage) system. Costs should instead be recovered from general harbour fees or general environmental

fees. Majority of the ports apply the system. There

  • availability of port reception facilities is room for improvement is some ports.

in the Baltic Sea Ports to be further enhanced covering the delivery of all

wastes, especially waste waters, taking HELCOM Moscow Ministerial Meeting adopted into account the proposal by the Roadmap for upgrading port reception facilities HELCOM Member States to the for sewage in passenger ports in the Baltic Sea International Maritime Organisation Area . Road map is to be implemented by 2015 at (IMO), asking for a prohibition of the the latest (the condition for the Baltic Sea Special discharge of sewage from ships, Area under Annex IV of MARPOL to take effect).

especially from passenger ships and

ferries A Cooperation Platform on PRF in the Baltic Sea ,

(FAST TRACK) with specific ToR, has been established to facilitate the implementation of the Roadmap, involving national administrations, passenger ports, and passenger shipping industry, and water and wastewater utilities. A round of stakeholder meetings re. PRF is being arranged (Gdynia, 4 March 2011; Tallinn, 5 April 2011; Helsinki, June 2011).

Finland “Promote measures to reduce On-going activities

Finnish Transport Safety Agency emissions from ships and enhance the development” The HELCOM-supported flagship InnoShip

Jorma Kämäräinen Project is to give advice to decision-makers on

( jorma.kamarainen@trafi.fi ) - for shore side electricity facilities or cost-efficient policy options to further reduce ship for emission treatment in all major emissions, especially in the light of designation of

Sweden ports around the Baltic Sea the Baltic Sea as a NECA (which will concern

Swedish Maritime Administration - promoted through taxation or tariff only new ships) and the need to create a level measures in order to come to a level playing field for existing ships.

Reidar Grundström playing field

( Reidar.Grundstrom@Sjofartsverket.se ) (FAST TRACK) The flagship Clean Ship project is also active in

this area.

Need for actions on national and port level to implement HELCOM Recommendation 28E/13 on introducing economic incentives as a complement to existing regulations to reduce emissions from ships.

HELCOM “Introduce differentiated port dues Need for actions on regional, national and port

Sweden depending on the environmental level to implement HELCOM Recommendation impact of ships” 28E/13 on introducing economic incentives as a

(Swedish Maritime Administration Reidar complement to existing regulations to reduce

Grundström - to set incentives for ships producing emissions from ships.

Reidar.Grundstrom@Sjofartsverket.se ) low emissions, managing waste water and ballast water in a sustainable way,

Finland using environmentally friendly Need to raise the interest of ports regarding

(Government of Åland technologies implementation of Ballast Water Management

Mikael Wennström, (FAST TRACK) Convention

mikael.wennstrom@regeringen.ax )

Finland HELCOM has already “Eliminate the discharge of sewage Accomplished work

(Finnish Transport Safety Agency Jorma accomplished this. from ships” HELCOM countries submitted to IMO MEPC 60

Kämäräinen ( jorma.kamarainen@trafi.fi )) Additional HELCOM contact: - establishing, through the International in December 2009 a joint proposal to designate

Jorma Kämäräinen, Finnish Maritime Organisation, the Baltic Sea the Baltic Sea as a control area for sewage Transport Safety Agency as a Special Area according to the discharges from passenger ships, whereby

jorma.kamarainen@trafi.fi Annex IV of MARPOL passenger ships will be required to treat their sewage to remove nutrients or deliver it to port

reception facilities. HELCOM countries have also submitted in June 2010 supplementary information to the proposal for consideration by MEPC 61 (MEPC 61/7). MEPC 61 approved new regulations, which – after adoption at MEPC 62 in 2011 - will come into force when the Baltic Sea countries inform IMO on adequacy of PRF for sewage in their passenger ports.

HELCOM countries have been requested to encourage voluntary tightening of the existing regime for sewage discharges from ships.

The European Cruise Council, representing the leading cruise companies operating in Europe, has committed their members to undertake to discharge waste water ashore at Baltic ports with adequate port reception facilities which operate under a “no-special-fee” system.

Region Blekinge, Sweden - Baltic Master “Improve the waste handling on board On-going activities

II and in ports” Policy framework in place (e.g. HELCOM

Therese Nilsson, - through better involvement of Recommendations 23/1 , 22/3 , 22/1 , 19/3 , 19/12 , ( therese.nilsson@regionblekinge.se ) different actors, i.e. coastal 19/10 , 19/9 , 14/7 and more at www.helcom.fi )

municipalities and ports together with national authorities, research institutes, universities and pan-Baltic organisations and finding practical solutions to improve waste handling (BALTIC MASTER II)

Danish Maritime Authority “Conduct a feasibility study on L G

Mogens Schrøder Bech( mb@dma.dk ) infrastructure for short sea shipping” to form the basis for further action in

Nordic Council of Ministers this field

Priority area 9: To reinforce sustainability of agriculture, forestry and fisheries; coordinated by Finland and Sweden

Finland: Minna-Mari Kaila and Leena Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM

Anttila Secretariat

Lithuania: Laimonas Čiakas mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi

Sweden: Agnetha Alriksson

Strategic actions

“Continue the adaptation of the Baltic fishing fleet capacity to the available resources”

  • evaluate the economic performance of the fleet segments and apply necessary measures to adjust fishing capacity to a level in-line with the available resource using national means or

regulations within the framework of the CFP

“Improve control and stop illegal On-going activities

fishing” Information exchange within HELCOM Baltic

  • enhancement of national quota Fisheries and Environmental Authorities Forum

utilisation and fisheries control and

inspection, especially by high- tech

monitoring and surveillance, improved Need for action

coordination and harmonisation among

Member States Availability of new technical means to monitor landings/catches; exchange of available Vessel

  • an effective traceability system based Monitoring System (VMS) data on existing legislation and further analysis of developments should be established
  • Copenhagen Declaration on combating unreported cod fishery in the Baltic Sea should be implemented

Cooperative actions

“Develop sustainable strategies for wood” within the framework of Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) and Research and Development Programmes (RDP)

  • to develop a common Baltic Sea Region approach
  • national forest programmes or similar and / or national renewable energy plans, balancing renewable energy development, nature conservation strategies and wood mobilisation

Lithuania Kaj Granholm, HELCOM “Enhance the combined effects of the On-going activities

Ministry of Agriculture Secretariat rural development programmes” HELCOM participation in Baltic COMPASS

Project 2010-2012:

Laimonas Čiakas ( laimon@zum.lt ) kaj.granholm@helcom.fi - streamlining of the rural development measures in the national rural

  • discussions of experiences and assessment of

Vitalija Fokienė ( vitalija.fokiene@zum.lt ) development programmes, including environmental efficiency of past Rural joint studies and monitoring Development Programmes between different - need to develop joint training and countries

advisory measures, with more emphasis - contribute to drafting of and discussion on on common innovation across borders implementability of changes to RDPs to

  • deeper cooperation between the Local adjust them accordingly in each country to Action Groups in LEADER and other target the locally critical issues

stakeholders in rural areas, leading to development of joint projects

NCM/SNS “Develop strategies for a sustainable

Mika Mustonen ( mika.mustonen@efi.int), use of and breeding with forest-,

Teemu Seppä ( teemu.seppa@mmm.fi) animal-, and plant genetic resources”

Mads Randbøll Wolf ( mrw@norden.org) that are considered to have positive

Katrine Hahn ( hahn@life.ku.dk) effect on hindering soil erosion, to

minimize the use of acidifying substances, on Carbon capture and storage and finally to conserve genetic diversity

Nordic Council of Ministers “Animal Health and disease control”

Swedish Board of Agriculture should be reinforced. Actions and

Joakim Holmdahl experience by the Nordic Council of

( joakim.holmdahl@jordbruksverket.se ) Ministers should be exploited for further cooperation and development, including

the Nordic Baltic cooperation in this field

“Enhance the combined effects of the European Fisheries Fund (EFF) programmes

  • streamlining of the coastal development measures in the national EFF programmes, including joint studies and monitoring
  • need to develop joint training and advisory measures, with more

    emphasis on common innovation across borders

  • deeper cooperation between the stakeholders, leading to

    development of joint projects

  • - inter-regional and trans-national cooperation to be promoted among the fisheries groups under the EFF support for the sustainable

    development of fisheries areas, mainly through the national and the Community networks

Flagship Projects

Sweden Anne Christine Brusendorff, “Develop and improve coordination On-going activities

Ministry of Agriculture HELCOM Secretariat and cooperation among Member States and stakeholders” on fisheries Work within HELCOM Baltic Fisheries and

Robert Andrén anne.christine@helcom.fi management in the Baltic Sea Environmental Forum assists the coordination and

( robert.andren@agriculture.ministry.se ) cooperation and a joint contribution to the EU on and A forum called Baltfish has been

the reform of CFP addresses for further

Agnetha Alriksson established to enhance collaboration regionalization of management and decision

href="mailto:agnetha.alriksson@agriculture.ministry.se">( agnetha.alriksson@agriculture.ministry.s Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM among Baltic Sea Member States as a making.

e ) Secretariat first step towards further regionalisation mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi

of fisheries management. The forum will elaborate with relevant Baltic Sea

organisations including the BS RAC and Co-ordination of activities between the HELCOM HELCOM how integration of concerned Fisheries and Environment Forum and BaltFish, stakeholders in fisheries management e.g. through back-to-back meetings.

and policy implementation can be strengthened

The project is expected to continue without a pre-determined endpoint

Denmark Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Eradicating discards” A joint statement to EU elaborated by the

Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Secretariat

HELCOM Baltic Fisheries and Environmental

Fisheries mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi

Even though discard rates are Forum on the discard issue

comparatively low in the Baltic Sea,

Ole Poulsen ( opo@fvm.dk ), there is scope for measures to reduce or eliminate them. This could be done by

Stina Gmür ( stgm@fvm.dk ) establishing joint pilot projects to identify viable solutions including gear modifications or temporal closures

A Technical Working Group was established in spring 2010 with two meetings held in April and May

The project is expected to be finished by the end of 2010 or

first half of 2011

Poland Kaj Granholm, HELCOM “Sustainable rural development” On-going activities

Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Secretariat - to develop sustainable rural tourism, HELCOM participation in Baltic COMPASS

Development kaj.granholm@helcom.fi agriculture, forestry and aquaculture or Project 2010-2012

Maria Szemplinska inland water fisheries

( Maria.Szemplinska@minrol.gov.pl ) - new practices on using an integrated approach to be developed to minimize

Sweden the leakage of nutrients

Swedish National Network for Rural

Development

Hans-Olof Stålgren ( hansolof@stalgren@hush.se )

Sweden Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM “Ensure sustainable fishing” On-going activities

Swedish Board of Fisheries Secretariat mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi - addressing failures and opportunities Work within HELCOM Baltic Fisheries and

Laura Piriz ( Laura.piriz@fiskeriverket.se ) in the policy as identified in the

Environmental Forum.

Common Fisheries Policy reform process in cooperation with stakeholders

concerned and including the Development of the Core Set of indicators to development of alternative approaches reflect the ecological objectives of the Baltic Sea and the exchange of existing best Action Plan and updating of the existing almost practice in support of the reform of the forty indicator fact sheets on the HELCOM policy website annually

  • public authorities and stakeholders to take into account the recommendations of the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan

Finland: “Encourage sustainable aquaculture Project proposal “Innovative practices and

Finnish Game and Fisheries Research production methods” technologies for developing sustainable

Institute - implemented by the European aquaculture in the Baltic Sea region” was

Unto Eskelinen ( unto.eskelinen@rktl.fi ) Fisheries Fund (EFF) operational

submitted for possible funding from the EU BSR

programmes of the EU Member States programme 2007-13

NCM/SNS “Sustainable forest management in the

Mika Mustonen Baltic Sea Region - EFI ORD” ( mika.mustonen@efi.int), EFINORD interacts with EU especially Teemu Seppä ( teemu.seppa@mmm.fi) in policy related issues and integrates Mads Randbøll Wolf ( mrw@norden.org) forest research of the Nordic region into Katrine Hahn ( hahn@life.ku.dk) Europe. The network should focus on

sustainable forest management, reflecting regional issues; primarily biomass production and ecosystem services, which are high on the agenda for forest owners, industry, and society at large

At the moment, there are altogether nine projects under the flagship. The projects are at various stages of project cycle. Project "Hardwoods are good" has received funding (1.2 million € from the South Baltic Programme) and implementation is underway. Three projects/activities ("Evolutionary genetic pockets for broadleaved tree species", "Cooperation in breeding of Norway spruce" and "Creating a Nordic-Baltic information service for forests and forestry") have received seed-money from the Nordic Council of Ministers. The goal of the seed money granted to launch start-up phase and to further develop project activities. The rest of the projects are currently still at planning phase or seeking funding.

NordGen "Network of institutions for

Nordic Council of Ministers management and conservation of plant genetic resources (PGR) in the

Mads Randbøll Wolf BSR under changing climate

( mrw@norden.org ) conditions"

to secure sustainable conservation and use of plant genetic resources relevant for food and agriculture. To accomplish this, networks of institutions within the region are already established to exchange and develop knowledge within the field.

Denmark Kaj Granholm, HELCOM “Establish a Forum for Inventive and On-going activities

Innovation Centre for Bioenergy and Secretariat Sustainable Manure Processing” - HELCOM Agriculture and Environment Forum

Environmental Technology (CBMI) kaj.granholm@helcom.fi BATMA HELCOM BALTHAZAR Project

Knud Tubrik ( kt@cbmi.dk ) and - exchange of information on how to HELCOM participation in the Baltic COMPASS

Finland process manure in sustainable ways in Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM Project the Baltic Sea Region to minimize the

Agrifood Research, Technology Research Secretariat environmental impact, and to reach and Environmental Research (MTT) mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi benefits such as renewable energy

Germany Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM "Recycling of phosphorus". Recycling Follow-up by HELCOM LAND and HELCOM

Julius-Kühn-Institut Secretariat of phosphorus is an urgent challenge as Agriculture and Environment Forum mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi it is estimated that the world's easily and

Silvia Haneklaus economically usable phosphorus will

( silvia.haneklaus@jki.bund.de ) last only for 50-150 years. At the same time the phosphorus load on waters

caused by agriculture is a cause for BATMAN eutrophication. New practices on using

an integrated approach should be developed to minimize the leakage of nutrients / phosphorus and to maximize the recycling of all kind phosphorus sources in addition to manure

Nordic Council of Ministers Mikhail Durkin, HELCOM "Reinforcement of animal health and

Swedish Board of Agriculture Secretariat disease control" mikhail.durkin@helcom.fi

Joakim Holmdahl In the Nordic-Baltic region veterinary

( joakim.holmdahl@jordbruksverket.se ) contingency planning has been on the common agenda for some years and

some of the experience will be used in a future cooperation in the whole Baltic Sea Region. The efforts made to facilitate training in the Nordic-Baltic region in the use of risk analysis and creation of networks for sharing experiences should be explored

Priority area 13: To become a leading region in maritime safety and security; coordinated by Finland and Denmark

Denmark Lolan Eriksson, Chair of

Bjarke Wiehe Bøtcher, DaMSA, HELCOM Maritime Group,

(bbt@frv.dk) Ministry of Transport and

Niels Wammen-Jensen Communications of Finland

Hamad Butt lolan.eriksson@mintc.fi

Steen Balslev and

Finland Monika Stankiewicz, HELCOM Secretariat

Silja Ruokola monika.stankiewicz@helcom.fi

Hannu Laurikaineni

Strategic actions

“Create a common maritime management system and monitoring, information and intelligence sharing environment for the Baltic Sea”

  • creation of an integrated network of reporting and surveillance systems is needed for all maritime activities, such as maritime safety, maritime security, protection of the marine environment, fisheries control, customs, border control and law enforcement
  • identify possible gaps and inconsistencies in fields where cooperation between civil and military assets exists, or could be developed in the future

HELCOM will contribute to this “Improve the coordination of systems On-going work on safety measures under the

strategic action relating to ships' routing and HELCOM Maritime Group.

monitoring of the vessel traffic and

consider establishing new systems”

A HELCOM meeting of experts on maritime

  • improve the coordination and safety, 22 February 2011, Malmö, identified 12 information sharing mechanisms areas for strengthening of regional expert between the existing systems to ensure cooperation in navigational safety.

their effective interoperability

  • Coastal states should jointly consider Overall risk analysis of shipping accidents onwhether new measures (routing/traffic going under the HELCOM’s BRISK and BRISK- separation schemes/mandatory RU Projects.

reporting systems) should be introduced

  • decisions on these measures should Joint application to IMO regarding increased use be based on the analysis of the risks and optimization of AIS application-specific and effectiveness of the measures messages, based on the AISBALTIC Project. The based on a formal safety assessment work will continue (within the AISBALTIC and research projects follow-up actions and the Efficient Sea Project

    reported to HELCOM AIS EWG) to promote the

  • jointly utilize improved satellite use of the messages in the Baltic Sea to enhance navigation systems, such as Galileo, to the information exchange between ships and support maritime positioning and shore authorities.

navigation, especially for Automatic Identification Systems (AIS), Vessel Traffic Management Systems (VMS), hazardous-cargo monitoring, for port approaches, ports and restricted waters as well as for safety systems for Search and Rescue

Additional HELCOM contact: “Jointly apply surveillance tools” Well under way

Bernt Stedt, Chairman of such as coastal radars, Automatic Joint aerial surveillance activities, supported by HELCOM Response Group, Identification System (AIS), Vessel AIS, VMS, satellites and oil drift forecasting tool Swedish Coast Guard Monitoring System (VMS), Long Seatrack Web coordinated by HELCOM bernt.stedt@coastguard.se Range Identification and Tracking of RESPONSE and its Informal Working Group on

Ships (LRIT), earth observation Aerial Surveillance. satellites and maritime patrol aircraft, in the Baltic Sea Region

  • cooperation between Baltic Sea Cooperation with EMSA well established, Region Member States and the including coordinated request for satellite images European Maritime Safety Agency in covering the Baltic Sea.

    tracing illegal discharges by ships will continue

    • further dialogue between relevant authorities, including the armed forces, to investigate the possibility of operating jointly national assets at regional level should take place

Cooperative actions

“Ensure that vessels, in particular Need to implement HELCOM Recommendation those transporting energy products or 28E/11 on further measures to improve the safety other dangerous cargo, are up to the of navigation in ice conditions in the Baltic Sea. highest maritime safety standards” and that crews serving onboard are well trained, in the framework of EU efforts on quality shipping especially in the light of the recently adopted third EU maritime safety package

Flagship Projects

Member State or Inter-governmental Body Additional HELCOM contact: “Conduct a technical feasibility study

(tbc), relevant European agencies to be

associated Bernt Stedt, Chairman of

on a Baltic Sea Coastal Patrol

HELCOM Response Group, etwork”

The Finnish Border Guard Swedish Coast Guard - to involve national “coast guard-like”

Marko Tuominen bernt.stedt@coastguard.se services in EU Member States and

( marko.tuominen@raja.fi ) third countries, in the context of maritime safety, maritime security, and

pollution prevention and response in the Baltic Sea

MARSUNO pilot project led by Sweden “Become a pilot region for the

Swedish Coast Guard Headquarters integration of maritime surveillance systems”

Dan Thorell

( dan.thorell@coastguard.se ) - to develop and test mechanisms for improving maritime awareness by

sharing operational information between government departments and agencies responsible for monitoring activities at sea of all Baltic Sea countries

  • development of technical interfaces that securely allow for all countries to join in a common situational image containing restricted law enforcement and other information

(FAST TRACK)

HELCOM International Hydrographic Monika Stankiewicz, HELCOM “Speed up re-surveying of major On-going activities

Organisation Secretariat shipping routes and ports” The Moscow Ministerial Meeting agreed to

(Juha Korhonen, Finnish Transport monika.stankiewicz@helcom.fi

extend the scope of the 2001 HELCOM

  • to ensure that safety of navigation is Copenhagen Declaration to cover all routes and Agency) not endangered by inadequate source other areas used for navigation according to the

information revised Baltic re-survey scheme to be developed

based on the 2009 Baltic Sea Hydrographic Commission Vision for the re-survey as well as to: - present their national re-survey plans preferably by 2013, but not later than 2015, including time schedule estimations; - undertake necessary measures to ensure that sufficient funding, including external funding, will be available for re-surveys; - undertake measures to improve mariners’ abilities to assess and interpret hydrographic content in nautical charts and publications either in printed or digital form, especially in the Electronic Chart Display and Information System.

The BSHC Re-survey Monitoring Working Group has adjusted its Work Programme accordingly (as approved by BSHC 15th

Conference in 2010). An application to the EU TEN-T funding to speed up re-surveys of the Finnish and Swedish area has been approved in 2011).

Danish Maritime Safety Administration “Become a pilot region for e

Thomas Christensen ( thc@frv.dk ) navigation”

  • establishing one or more e-navigation trial zones, in view of the gradual achievement of an integrated network of e-navigation systems for European coastal waters and the high seas (EfficienSea project)

(FAST TRACK)

Poland “Create a network of centres of Need to implement

excellence for maritime training” HELCOM Recommendation 28E/11 on further Ministry of Infrastructure, Department of - to provide young people attractive measures to improve the safety of navigation in

Maritime Transport and Inland Navigation prospects for a life-long career in ice conditions in the Baltic Sea. maritime enterprises / professions and

Dorota Lost-Sieminska facilitate mobility between sea and land HELCOM supports at policy level training in ECDIS use (through its Ministerial Meeting in

Justyna Bartnicka based jobs Moscow in May 2010).

( jbartnicka@mi.gov.pl ) “Jointly develop high standards of

training, drills and exercises” for upgrading seafarers' competences, and adapting requirements to today's shipping industry (sophisticated vessels, ICT, security and safety, navigation in ice conditions)

  • ensure familiarity with security plans and procedures for ship and port facility security

Member State or Inter-governmental Body “Develop a plan to reduce the number

(tbc) of accidents in fisheries”

  • improving the way information on accidents is gathered and analysed, enhanced training and awareness programmes, as well as sharing best practices and developing specific measures to increase the safety of fishermen

Poland “Conduct a pre-study on possible funding for a formal risk assessment for L G carriers in the Baltic Sea Area”

  • to identify any preventive measures and regulations in relation to safety and security.

Priority area 14: To reinforce maritime accident response capacity protection from major emergencies; coordinated by Denmark

Denmark Bernt Stedt, Chairman of

Danish Defence Command / Policy HELCOM Response Group,

Branch Swedish Coast

Claus Smith Rasmussen Guardbernt.stedt@coastguard.se

and

Monika Stankiewicz, HELCOM Secretariat monika.stankiewicz@helcom.fi

Strategic actions

HELCOM is already “Implement the HELCOM Baltic Sea On-going HELCOM cooperation implementing this strategic action Action Plan (BSAP)”

and is ready to take the lead Well under way - to ensure swift national and

international response to maritime A stand-by network of response vessels in all pollution incidents, including Baltic Sea countries is already established and intensifying cooperation between ready to assist each other in case of ship pollution offshore and shoreline response according to HELCOM Response Manual .

(notably including local and regional

authorities), On-going HELCOM Project “Sub-regional risk of

and enhanced cooperation on places of spill of oil and hazardous substances in the Baltic refuge based on directive 2002/59 i Sea” ( BRISK ), co-financed within the Baltic Sea

  • a mutual plan for places of refuge is Region Programme from ERDF. Complementary under development to ensure that a activities in Russia are funded within the Nordic ship in distress is always granted the Council of Ministers (NCM) BRISK-RU project. most suitable place of refuge These two projects aim at ensuring that each subirrespective

of national borders region in the Baltic Sea will be capable of efficiently responding to major pollution at sea.

HELCOM Response Manual has been amended with cooperation on oiled wildlife response. A new HELCOM Expert Working Group on Shoreline Response established e.g. to include also transboundary shoreline response into the HELCOM operational procedures.

HELCOM Recommendation 31E/5 on Mutual Plan for Places of Refuge adopted at the HELCOM Ministerial Meeting on 20 May 2010, Moscow.

Cooperative actions

“Develop a winter storms and storm surge prevention and preparedness approach”

  • develop methods on how to enhance cooperation between different local, regional and national agencies having a role in emergency operations relating to winter storms and storm surge, and on how to increase synergies with the Community Civil Protection Mechanism
  • methods for cooperation should be given a broad interpretation including public awareness actions, contingency planning, disaster scenarios, communication systems, use of technology, joint exercises and training, etc.

Flagship Projects

Member State or Inter-governmental “Assess volunteer troops capacities On-going activities

Body/VOMARE project (tbc) regarding maritime pollution

response, as well as maritime search HELCOM-supported Project “EnSaCo” on

and rescue operations” transboundary cooperation on shoreline and wildlife response, including organization of

volunteers, between Sweden, Finland, Estonia and

Russia.

HELCOM cooperation with Sea Alarm and WWF

Finland, including the jointly developed

HELCOM Recommendation 31E/6 on Wildlife

Response Planning in the Baltic Sea area adopted

by 2010 HELCOM Ministerial Meeting.

Admiral Danish Fleet HQ “Map existing marine pollution On-going activity

Project Manager: Peter Poulsen, DK response capacities and make subregional plans for cross-border The BRISK and BRISK-RU Projects (see a response cooperation” strategic action) implemented under the umbrella of the HELCOM Response Group. Note: The

  • based on assessment of the integrated lifespan of the project has been extended to April risk of shipping accidents (BRISK 2012. project, financed by the ‘Baltic Sea Region’ transnational programme, which is part of the ‘Territorial Cooperation’ objective)

(FAST TRACK) 24 Oct. 2011

Member State or Inter-governmental Body "Develop scenarios and identify gaps"

(tbc) for all main hazards, including winter storms and floods in order to:

  • to anticipate potential disasters, thus enabling a rapid and effective EU response through the Community Civil Protection Mechanism

Horizontal actions

Become a pilot project in implementing the Marine Strategy Framework Directive

Maria Laamanen, HELCOM The Marine Strategy Framework On-going activities

Secretariat Directive includes the option for a The HELCOM Moscow Ministerial Declaration

maria.laamanen@helcom.fi region to be a pilot project, subject to some eligibility conditions, when the established the role of HELCOM as the regional

status of a marine region is so critical platform for the implementation of the MSFD. as to necessitate urgent action. This Overall coordination for the regional entails that the European Commission implementation of the MSFD is being carried out provides supportive action. The by the Joint Advisory Board of the HELCOM recognition of the environmental CORESET and TARGREV projects. Expert work degradation of the Baltic Sea led to the on establishing indicators and GES targets is adoption of the HELCOM Baltic Sea being carried out in the HELCOM CORESET Action Plan (BSAP), which is coherent project, and the TARGREV project for with the concept of an early strengthening the eutrophication status targets’ programme of measures required for a scientific basis.

pilot project. Therefore, the consideration of supportive action by

the Commission should be urgently The HELCOM National Implementation addressed in the framework of the EU Programme Project (NIP Project) presented a first Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region. evaluation of the nine National Implementation With a view to progress towards the Programmes for how the countries have/will establishment of a pilot project in the implement the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan, Baltic Sea, an important form of at the HELCOM 32/2011 high-level segment in "supportive action" already at this stage order to share experience on common solutions to could be to optimise the use of EU joint Baltic-wide activities. The outcome of the funds having regard to the critical evaluation was reflected in a Communiqué of the status of the Baltic Sea, thereby High-level Segment, noting the progress and securing effective integration of successful implementation in various fields, as environmental concerns in the real well as the areas in which more activities are application of sectoral policies, to required. Together with a representative of the better address the urgent environmental NIB/NEFCO Technical Assistance Fund for the challenges related to the Baltic Sea, as HELCOM BSAP (BSAP Fund), the HELCOM

agreed by the European Council. Secretariat is trying to promote the development of project ideas within these focus areas, through

visits to the countries and dialogues with interested stakeholders.

Encourage the use of Maritime Spatial Planning in all Member States around the Baltic Sea and develop a common approach for cross-border cooperation

Increased activities in the Baltic Sea Accomplished work lead to competition for limited marine

space between sectoral interests, such Establishment of the joint HELCOM-VASAB as shipping and maritime transport, working group on maritime spatial planning offshore energy, ports development, (HELCOM-VASAB MSP WG)

fisheries and aquaculture in addition to environmental concerns. Maritime

Spatial Planning (MSP) is a key tool Adopted mandate for the joint HELCOM- for improved decision-making that VASAB MSP WG

balances sectoral interests that compete for marine space, and contributes to

achieving sustainable use of marine HELCOM-VASAB Baltic Sea Broad –scale areas to benefit economic development Maritime Spatial Planning Principles adopted in as well as the marine environment. The the end of 2010

development of a Maritime Planning System for the Baltic Sea, based on the

ecosystem approach, is encouraged at Approved Work Plan for the years 2010-2013 for national level as well as common the Working Group by the Second Meeting of the

cross-border cooperation for the Joint HELCOM-VASAB MSP WG

implementation of the Maritime Spatial Planning in the Baltic Sea following

the key common principles set out in On-going activities the recently adopted Commission's The application of the MSP principles is being Roadmap for Maritime Spatial tested within the EU funded HELCOM led Planning. The European Community project PlanBothnia project .

and the HELCOM contracting States have agreed in the context of the

HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan to The discussion within the group continues on the develop such an integrated tool, and international legislative basis for MSP as well as relevant initiatives are also in process the application of the ecosystem approach as an with VASAB, Baltic Regional overarching principle for MSP, with the aim to Advisory Council78 and relevant identify basic elements and find a common stakeholders. The Commission will understanding on these two issues.

also launch preparatory actions in the Baltic Sea to test the implementation of Maritime Spatial Planning in a crossborder context in close cooperation with the Baltic Member States.

Transform successful pilot and demonstration projects into full-scale actions

This knowledge has been gained through projects financed by EU, national, regional funds or private funds. For example, such projects have been / are being implemented under the umbrella of HELCOM, Baltic 21, the Nordic Council of Ministers, Partnerships in the framework of the Northern Dimension etc. Under the ‘Baltic Sea Region’ transnational Programme which is part of the ‘Territorial Cooperation’ objective of the ERDF some projects are also supported. The potential of this transnational Programme, which covers already the Baltic macro-region, should be maximised.

Use research as a base for policy decisions

Maria Laamanen, HELCOM To achieve the objectives of the On-going activities Secretariat strategy (including the restoring of the

maria.laamanen@helcom.fi Baltic Sea environment, adapting to

The HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan is an

climate change, developing sustainable example of a comprehensive action plan which is

fisheries, agriculture and tourism or based on coherent scientific information,

establishing common spatial planning), including a long tradition of HELCOM in

there is a need for actions and measures monitoring and assessment activities. HELCOM

by all countries in many different continues activities to strengthen the knowledge

sectors. Often these are very expensive, basis that support the various activities in

and it is necessary to prioritise. Applied implementing the Baltic Sea Action Plan.

(or policy linked) research with participations from all countries in the

Baltic Sea region can provide the Development of the Core Set of Indicators is the necessary data for such decisions to be first step of the revision of HELCOM’s made. The Baltic Nest decision support monitoring programmes and is being carried out

system and the BONUS+ programme by the HELCOM CORESET project. (continued as BONUS 185) are among the most important, together with the planned research programme on costs Activities needed

for no actions (a Baltic “Stern” report). Revision of HELCOM monitoring programmes to

adjust to the current needs and new policy frameworks should be undertaken and HELCOM HOD have agreed in principle on a HELCOM MORE project to begin the revision.

Define and implement the Baltic Sea basin component of the European Marine Observation Data etwork (EMOD ET) and improve socio-economic data

Marine data – geological, physical, On-going activities chemical and biological - collected

largely by public institutions, are still HELCOM and its data hosts hold large quantities fragmented, of uncertain quality and of data collected by the Contracting Parties difficult to assemble into coherent through the various HELCOM monitoring pictures of the entire Baltic sea-basin. programmes initiated already in the 1970s.

The Commission has proposed a European Marine Observation and

Data Network (EMODNET). As a Development of the HELCOM map and preparatory action of this initiative, a information service on the HELCOM web site first versions of sea-basin scale map will continue.

layers of Baltic geology (sediments, geohazards, mineral resources) and

broad-scale marine habitats (building Need for actions

on the work of the BALANCE project) To ensure the use of the above-mentioned data, as will be ready by 2010. The well as data structures and that EMODNET will Commission has also developed a contribute to the development of the HELCOM database on data for maritime sectors data collection and storage

and coastal regions that constitute a first step towards developing Baltic sea-basin-wide socio-economic indicators.

Chapter 3: A presentation of the contribution of the

Structural Funds programmes

This chapter describes the contribution of the Structural Funds programmes to the implementation of the Baltic Sea Strategy. It is based on the reports provided by Managing

Authorities of the different convergence, competitiveness and employment, as well as European territorial cooperation programmes covering the Baltic Sea Region.

They are presented:

• by country and by programme for convergence and competitiveness programmes (an analytical summary by country followed by a technical sheet for each programme)

• by strand and by programme for European territorial cooperation programmes (one technical sheet by programme)

• by fund.

The complete version of the reports of programmes sent by Managing Authorities will be put on the DG REGIO website: http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/cooperation/baltic/index_en.htm

3.1 Contributions by country and by programme for convergence and competitiveness areas

3.1.1. Denmark (Total area: 43 098 km 2 – Population: 5 534 738 inhabitants)

3.1.1.1. Analytical summary

Denmark is covered by the ERDF Programme "Innovation and Knowledge" and the ESF Programme "More and Better Jobs" under the regional competitiveness and employment objective 2007-13.

The two programmes are closely related and combine four growth drivers defined by the OECD: human resource development, innovation, entrepreneurship, and the use of new technology.

In addition, Denmark participates in six territorial cooperation programmes.

The programme "Innovation and Knowledge" receives €255 million from the ERDF; the programme "More and Better Jobs" receives €255 million from the ESF; and the territorial cooperation programmes receive €103 million from the ERDF.

Administratively, Denmark is divided into five regions 57 with regionally elected political

leadership. The tasks of the regions include health care, operation of social and special education institutions as well as regional development. Furthermore, the regions are in charge of the regional growth forums, which prepare the Regional Business Development Strategies that are the basis for committing ERDF and ESF funds on the ground under the regional competitiveness and employment objective (within the overall framework of the respective

ERDF and ESF Programmes).

57 Each of the five Danish regions correspond to a NUTS II region re: Commission Regulation (EC) No 105/2007 i of 1 February

2007 amending the annexes to Regulation (EC) No 1059/2003 i of the European Parliament and of the Council on the establishment of a common classification of territorial units for statistics (NUTS), http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:32007R0105:EN:NOT

The Managing Authority for both the ERDF and ESF is the Danish Enterprise and Construction Authority under the Ministry of Economic and Business Affairs. In the regions, the Growth Forums and the Growth Forum Secretariats are managing the calls for proposals, etc.

3.1.1.2. Description of the ERDF Programme "Innovation and Knowledge"

Programme Description

The ERDF Programme "Innovation and Knowledge", which includes a single priority plus technical assistance, is focusing on innovation, entrepreneurship, and the use of new technology.

About 75 % of the ERDF funds had been allocated by the end of 2010 to approved projects and projects undergoing approval.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

The Managing Authority established in 2010 a simplified monitoring system where the regional growth centres can register ERDF and ESF projects relevant to the implementation of the EUSBSR, including categorisation of the related expenditure. The growth centres have received relevant guidance accompanying the request to register such projects from January

2010 onwards.

During 2010, the following two projects were registered:

− In the field of research and technological development, the ERDF is supporting "growth

projects having research and innovation potential in the Baltic Sea Region" with

€320 126.73;

− In the environmental field, the ERDF is supporting the project "making the Baltic Sea

Region a sustainable area – climate change, clusters and sustainable cities" with

€581 664.00

Both projects are located in the Zealand region. The Managing Authority estimates that the two projects contribute indirectly to achieving the objectives of the EUSBSR, as they are neither initiated in view of the Baltic Sea Strategy nor specifically targeting the implementation of the Strategy.

In March 2010, the Managing Authority asked the regional Growth Forum secretariats to consider how the Baltic Sea Strategy could be incorporated into the updating of their regional business strategies. The Growth Forums were also asked to consider whether the regional selection criteria should place special emphasis on "Baltic Sea Strategy" projects.

A single Growth Forum, South Denmark, has indicated that when the business development strategy is updated, the Baltic Sea Strategy will be incorporated, including the introduction of a specific selection criterion favouring projects related to the Baltic Sea Strategy. The Growth

Forum in South Denmark notes, however, that the Baltic Sea Strategy seems more relevant to its Danish-German territorial cooperation.

Three Growth Forums, Zealand, Copenhagen and Bornholm, mention the Baltic Sea Strategy in their new business development strategies. The clearest support for the Strategy is expressed by Growth Forum Zealand, which is emphasising renewable energy, environmental technologies, sustainable construction/housing and climate-friendly innovation. The Growth

Forum in Bornholm has expressed interest in the Baltic Sea Strategy.

The Growth Forums in Mid-Jutland and North-Jutland do not make specific references to the Baltic Sea Strategy, which is somewhat reasonable in view of the geographic location of these regions.

Tables and figures

Total EU Decided Amount Funding capacity of the Danish funding projects (*) remaining ERDF Programme "Innovation available (million €) available and Knowledge" (million €) (million €) Axis 1. Innovation and

Knowledge 245.1 189.9 55.4 Axis 2. Technical Assistance 9.7 5.5 4.2 Total 254.8 195.4 59.6

(*) Decided projects include both projects that have been approved by the Managing Authority and projects that have been submitted to the Managing Authority for approval after selection by the regional Growth Forums. Exchange rate used: 7.45 DKK/EUR. Source: Managing Authority, 30 April 2011.

3.1.2. Estonia (Total area: 45 227 km 2 – Population: 1 340 127 inhabitants)

3.1.2.1. Analytical summary

ERDF, CF and ESF programmes in Estonia: Implementation process

Organisational measures taken in order to implement the EUSBSR

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs has set up an Inter-Ministerial working group under the coordination of the National Contact Point. Based on the discussions held in this group, screening of measures was performed. As a result, the Structural and Cohesion Fund measures, as well as measures funded from the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and the European Fisheries Fund, were divided into a) measures considerably contributing to the objectives of the EUSBSR Priority Areas, b) measures with indirect or less considerable contribution, and c) measures without direct relevance to the EUSBSR objectives. Concerning the measures of the first group, the results and contribution to the EUSBSR objectives were described in the 2010 implementation reports of the relevant Operational Programmes (OP) and Rural Development Plan, including financial data. Concerning the measures of the second group, their contribution was also described in the text part of the reports.

It does not appear that any particular changes, other than the reference to the Strategy, have been made to the programmes nor are there any additional structures set up to accommodate the Strategy. On a national level, it is reported that decisions on projects have already been made regarding circa 80% of the assistance foreseen for the period. From the Estonian point of view, the Strategy was completed only after the OPs were already being implemented, and the selection or evaluation criteria of projects to be co-financed were not modified as the Strategy was adopted. It was decided that the OP and Strategy are sufficiently aligned and modification of the selection or evaluation criteria is not necessary.

Examples of projects contributing to the EUSBSR

Estonian reports present a large variety of examples of implemented projects consistent with the Strategy.

Examples of indirect contribution include the clusters programme for enterprises, which supports involvement of cross-border foreign partners. In addition, there are a lot of activities to promote internationalisation of Estonian enterprises: Export Marketing Support, Support to Joint Marketing, Support to Participation in Foreign Fairs, Programme of Introducing Estonia as a Tourism Destination, Programme of Development of Tourism Information Systems, Support to Tourism Marketing for Businesses, Support to Marketing Activities of the Public and the Third Sectors, and Support to International Events and Conferences.

Projects contributing directly to the Strategy goals include many environmental projects – water, waste water, residual pollution clean-up, closure of landfills, energy savings, etc. – and transport projects. Estonian transport programmes contribute towards the Rail Baltica and Via Baltica Flagship Projects. Estonia has completed the railroad reconstruction works, such that a 120 km/h speed is now possible on the Estonian Rail Baltica section. In the road sector, works have commenced on the Pärnu section of the Via Baltica road. Projects of the Estonian Meteorological and Hydrological Institute also contribute directly to Priority Area 13: To become a leading region in maritime safety and security.

Estonian authorities plan to host a conference on e-ID within the framework of actions directly related to the EUSBSR – The European e-Identity Management Conference 2011 (8–9 June 2011 – Tallinn, Estonia).

Main problems encountered

No problems are specifically reported, but it appears that coordinating the development and the implementation of the process between NCPs, Ministries and PACs, political involvement, the delivery mechanism and alignment of funding sources are also the main difficulties to overcome in Estonia.

On October 14-15, 2010 the Annual Forum of the Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region was held in Tallinn, where the working group of horizontal themes also revised possibilities for the use of different structural resources to achieve the objectives of the Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region.

Main lessons learned and what should be done in the future to improve links between programmes and the EUSBSR

The possibility is left open to modify the criteria in the future and to try to have more coherent integration of the strategic planning (joint proposal by Estonia and Sweden) and of the delivery system in the future.

From the Commission’s point of view, the joint proposal by Estonia and Sweden and the preliminary actions taken to develop a more coherent integration of the Strategy at the national level when preparing the next programming period constitute significant attempts to improve the overall coherence of the strategic framework at EU, macro-regional and national levels, the functioning of the delivery system and the success in achieving the targeted results. During the current programming period, it would be recommended to start to make use of the possibility to carry out cooperation projects under the convergence objective programmes within the meaning of Article 37 6) b) of Regulation 1083/2006 i.

Estimated contribution of the EU convergence objective Operational Programmes in Estonia, to implementation of the EUSBSR objectives (more detailed information is provided in the presentation factsheet by ERDF and CF Operational Programmes in Estonia).

Estimated contribution of the EU convergence objective OPs in Estonia to implementation of the EUSBSR based on the decided projects (for more detailed information, see factsheet by OP in Estonia)

Priority Areas of the Strategy ESF+ ERDF+CF amount (€)

R&D 0 Innovation 30 060 027 Energy 27 874 638 Transport 299 816 774 Environment 403 642 355

Other: tourism, youth, Priority Area no 6, 9 390 528 8, 12

Total ESF+ERDF+CF 770 784 322

3.1.2.2. Contribution of the convergence objective Operational Programme for

Development of the Economic Environment in Estonia to the EUSBSR

Programme Description

The Programme is co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund (€879 million) and the Cohesion Fund (€525 million) under the convergence objective. This forms approximately 41.3% of the total EU money invested in Estonia under cohesion policy 2007- 13.

The OP for the Economic Environment aims at further improving the environment where economic competitiveness and productivity of enterprises can increase. This means that support is made available to a wide range of economic activities, from technology-intensive industries to tourism and development of creative industries (design, architecture etc.). The OP will support knowledge creation and dissemination in universities, research institutions and enterprises. In addition, investments are foreseen for transport infrastructure in the Estonian regions and for public transport networks. Trans-European Networks (TEN) connecting Estonia with neighbouring countries and the central part of Europe will be improved. In addition to physical infrastructure, the OP will support the development of Information Society services.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

The measures of this OP contribute directly and indirectly to the EUSBSR Priority Areas No 6, 7, 8, 11 and 12, because the activities designed to provide support have an impact on economic competitiveness and improve the overall quality of life and attractiveness of Estonia as one of the Baltic Sea coastal countries.

The most important measures contributing to the Strategy include:

Entrepreneurship: Support for Cluster Development, Start-up Estonia Programme, Programme of Technological Development Centres, Support to Research and Development Projects, National Business Loan Guarantees and Capital Loan Programme, Export Marketing Support, Export Development Support, Support to Joint Marketing, Support to Participation in Foreign Fairs, Supplementary Support Package to Improved Availability of Loan Capital to Businesses, National Export Credit Insurance Programme; Tourism: the Programme of Introducing Estonia as a Tourism Destination, the Programme of Development of Tourism Information Systems, Support to Tourism Marketing of Businesses, Support to Marketing Activities of the Public and the Third Sectors, Support to International Events and Conferences; and Research and higher education: Modernisation of Research Infrastructure of National Importance, Support to International Cooperation in R&D, Development of Research Centres of Excellence, Modernisation of the Learning Infrastructure of Applied Higher Education and Teacher Training, Modernisation of the Infrastructure of Learning and Work Environments of Research and Development Institutions and Institutions of Higher Education.

In information society, the OP supports the development of the information system required for the electronic use of IDs, improving access to fast internet connections.

In transport, the projects selected include reconstruction of Rail Baltica sections and the Pärnu detour road of Via Baltica.

Tables and figures

Contribution of the OP Economic Environment in Estonia

to the implementation of the EUSBSR

Main Priority ERDF+CF ERDF+CF ERDF+CF areas of the amount for amount of amount for Strategy projects in financing other projects line with for contributing to the Flagship the Strategy Strategy Projects (€) (€) identified in the action plan of the Strategy (€) Innovation 98 357 602 0 30 060 027 (Priority Area no 7) Transport 199 718 228 67 395 672 232 421 102 (Priority Area no 11): Incl. ERDF 72 865 632 0 15 466 619 Incl. CF 126 852 596 67 395 672 216 954 483 Other: (Priority 268 658 696 1 453 758 Area no 6, 8, 12) Total ERDF+CF 566 734 526 67 395 672 262 624 887

Main Priority Areas of the ERDF/CF

Strategy contribution (€)

R&D (Priority Area no 7) 0

Innovation (Priority Area no 7) 30 060 027

Energy 0

Transport (Priority Area no 11): 299 816 774

Incl. ERDF 15 466 619

Incl. CF 284 350 155

Environment 0

Other: (Priority Area no 6, 8, 12) 1 453 758

Total ERDF+CF 1 067 643 948

Total EU Decided Amount funding projects remaining

Funding capacity of the OP available (€) available Economic Environment (€) (€) Axis 1 Innovation and growth capacity of enterprises 375 480 935 361 051 701 14 429 234 Axis 2 Improving the competitiveness of Estonian R&D through the research programmes and modernisation of higher education and R&D institutions 310 223 307 190 602 289 119 621 018 Axis 3 Transport investments of strategic importance 525 397 290 413 607 768 111 789 522 Axis 4 Development of regional transport infrastructure 100 936 867 107 663 982 -6 727 115 Axis 5 Development of information society 62 633 416 50 245 873 12 387 543 Total 1 374 671 815 1 123 171 613 251 500 202

3.2.2.3. Contribution of the convergence objective Operational Programme for the

Development of the Living Environment in Estonia to the EUSBSR

Programme description

The Programme is co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund (€879 million) and the Cohesion Fund (€525 million) under the convergence objective. This forms approximately 41.3% of the total EU money invested in Estonia under cohesion policy 2007- 13.

The programme aims at improving the quality of life in Estonia in environmental and social terms. Therefore, the OP lays the basis for long-term sustained growth of Estonia. Major investments will be directed into fulfilling EU directives on water, waste water and solid waste management. Furthermore, environmental protection will be improved by dedicating resources to environmental education and constant monitoring. Estonia will be better equipped to fight environmental emergencies, such as forest fires and accidents at sea – particularly with oil tankers. The OP supports energy efficiency and use of renewable energy.

The OP will also improve infrastructure for services in a large number of local communities, thus resolving important social issues hindering economic development. In addition, there will be major improvements in vocational training infrastructure, boarding school infrastructure, schools for students with special educational needs, etc. Support will be given to the modernisation and optimisation of hospital networks in order to provide better and more accessible services. Better living, learning and working conditions will also be provided for children and for adults with special psychiatric needs living in welfare institutions.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

The most important measures contributing to the Strategy include:

Environment: Development of water management infrastructure, Improvement of the status of watercourses, Inventory of barrage structures on watercourses for the improvement of migration conditions of fish, Clean-up of past contamination in former military and industrial sites, Closure of inadequate non-hazardous waste landfills, Closure and remediation of landfills not meeting the requirements of the oil shale industry, Closure of waste dumps of oil shale based power industry and modernisation of ash removal system, Drafting of management plans of protected areas and action plans for species to ensure preservation of biological diversity, Development of environmental monitoring, Development of environmental education infrastructure, Improvement of preparedness for environmental emergencies; Energy: Broader use of renewable energy sources for energy production, Renovation loan for apartment buildings, Information on population energy conservation in dwellings, Support for energy audit and building expertise and drafting of building project; Local development: Strengthening of the competitiveness of regions, Development of cultural and tourism sites with national importance and Development of urban regions; Information Society: Improvement of the availability of internet connections through the adoption of a new generation of electronic communication networks in the regions; Education: Modernisation of open youth centres, information and counselling centres and hobby schools.

Tables and figures

Contribution of the OP Economic Environment in Estonia to the implementation of the EUSBSR ERDF+CF amount of

ERDF+CF financing ERDF+CF

Main Priority amount for for Flagship amount for

Areas of the projects in Projects other projects

Strategy line with the identified in contributing

Strategy (€) the Action to the Strategy

Plan of the (€)

Strategy (€)

Energy 0 0 27 874 638

Transport 13 049 195 0 0

186 Other:

Tourism, youth 119 079 191 0 0

Total

ERDF+CF 230 928 754 4 986 387 311 413 704

Main Priority Areas of the ERDF/ CF

Strategy amount (€)

R&D 0 Innovation 0

Energy 27 874 638 Transport 0

Environment 403 642 355

Other: Tourism,

youth 0

Total ERDF+CF 431 516 993

Total EU

funding Decided

Amount

Funding capacity of the OP available projects

remaining available

Economic Environment (€) (€) (€)

Axis 1 Development of water and

waste management infrastructure 626 334 156 490 108 149 136 226 007

Axis 2 Development of infrastructures and support

systems for sustainable use of the 92 032 774 75 477 095 16 555 679

environment

Axis 3 Development of Energy

Sector 87 175 488 27 813 840 59 361 648

187 Axis 5 Development of education

infrastructure 212 765 713 176 244 430 36 521 283

Axis 6 Development of health

care and welfare infrastructure 169 110 222 165 340 031 3 770 191

Total 1 607 314 506 1 197 624 374 409 690 132

3.1.3. Finland (Total area: 338 424 km 2 – Population: 5 351 427 inhabitants)

3.1.3.1. Analytical summary

European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and European Social Fund (ESF) programmes in Finland: Implementation process

Situation on 31 December 2010:

• 318 ERDF and 93 ESF-projects identified supporting the EUSBSR (5.5% of all projects)

• Public funding committed to projects supporting the EUSBSR: ERDF

Operational Programmes (OP): €144.3 million and ESF: €59.4 million =

11.0% of all commitments

• Most important Priority Areas in ERDF Operational Programmes: B7, A1 and

A5, in ESF B8.

Finland has a leading role in three Priority Areas: to reduce nutrient inputs to the Sea to acceptable levels (PA 1); to reinforce sustainability of agriculture, forestry and fisheries (PA

9); and to decrease the volume of, and harm done by, cross-border crime (PA 15).

Organisational measures taken in order to implement the EUSBSR

The Finnish Ministry of Employment and the Economy has developed the monitoring system of the Structural Funds (EURA2007) to also be used in monitoring the EUSBSR implementation. Furthermore, the EUSBSR issues have been put on the agendas of all monitoring committee meetings of Finnish Operational Programmes (OPs), and relevant training, information and communication measures have taken place. The Finnish Government has also been active on Baltic Sea issues, giving a communication to the parliament on the issue (mainly on international cooperation issues) and organising the "Baltic Sea Action Summit" on 10.02.2010.

In Finnish opinion, the Structural Funds (SF) OPs already support the objectives of the EUSBSR quite well, even without fundamental changes. The SF monitoring system has been modified so that it can create information necessary for following up the implementation i.e. the Implementing Bodies (IB) can categorise the project as supporting the Strategy.

The Commission revised its initial guidance on "earmarking" or identifying the projects supporting the EUSBSR in the OPs. According to the latest guidance, under several priorities, international cooperation is expected in order to label the project as supporting the EUSBSR. In most cases the ERDF activities do not include an international aspect. Especially under priority 1 (business support) some projects cannot be labelled as supporting the Strategy because of the lack of international aspects, even though content-wise they would fit the Strategy.

Examples of projects contributing to the EUSBSR

Overall in the monitoring system (by the end of 2010), there were 411 projects supporting the Strategy. This represents 5.5% of all the projects and 11% of all the funding committed to the programmes. €204 million of public funding has been committed to the (411) projects supporting the Strategy.

The South Finland OP and its priority axis 5 (28% of the financing of the Programme) can be cited as the "best practice" among the Finnish OPs. Priority 5 (which does not exist in other OPs) includes special themes that can be implemented within the entire programme area. 80% of the financing for the priority axis will be channelled into themes supporting the development of knowledge clusters and 20% for actions that support other ongoing programmes, particularly international actions. The Baltic Sea Strategy has been adopted as one of the criterion affecting the project selection for priority axis 5. This priority would also be best suited regarding international cooperation under Art. 37.6.b.

Main problems encountered

Getting a complete picture of what is happening in the Baltic Sea Region (BSR) is difficult.

The lack of coherent funding sources is seen as (one of) the biggest hindrance to the implementation of the EUSBSR from the Finnish perspective.

As the EUSBSR was adopted in the middle of the current programming period 2007-13, its role and contribution through the OPs couldn't be foreseen.

The second big challenge regarding the alignment of funding is that the programmes weren't initially meant to be a funding source for the international cooperation activities.

It's the Finnish opinion that the cooperation programmes (e.g. Central Baltic and South Baltic programmes) are better suited to support the Strategy than the Structural Funds OPs. However, as the resources under the cooperation programmes are almost exhausted, the mainstream SF OPs can also positively contribute to the implementation of the EUSBSR.

Main lessons learned and what should be done in the future to improve links between programmes and the EUSBSR

The first year of the implementation has been characterised by creating networks and arranging kick-offs for the Flagship Projects. From the Finnish perspective, the Strategy has advanced quite well, even in this first year. It can be clearly seen that the Strategy has succeeded best in launching activities in the sectors where there was already a strong commitment and clear/active networks and actors.

Seeing the SF as an important funding source for the Strategy is more natural in the countries where the SF have a very significant role in public financing overall. As the SF in Finland are limited, the other financing sources play a bigger role.

Estimated contribution of the EU competitiveness and employment objective OPs in Finland to the implementation of the EUSBSR based on the decided projects (for more detailed information, see fiche by OP in Finland)

Number of % of all Public The priority most supported projects the funding (%) supporting projects committed the funded in (million €) EUSBSR the OP

South Finland OP 94 10% 40.4 A5 (17%) and B7 (17%)

West Finland OP 47 4% 10 A2 (25.5%) and A5 (19.1%)

East Finland OP 105 6% 44.3 B7 (46.7%) and C12 (19%)

North Finland OP 72 4% 49.5 A1 (40.3%) and C12 (13.9%)

191 Number of projects supporting EUSBSR priority areas

90 North Finland

80

70 West Fi nland

60 East Finland

50 South Finland

40

30

20

10

0

A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 B6 B7 B8 B9 C10 C11 C12 D13 D14 D15

Total public funding (million €) committed on EUSBSR priority areas

45

40 North Fi nl and

35 Wes t Fi nland

30 Eas t Fi nland

25 South Fi nl and

20

15

10

5

0

A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 B6 B7 B8 B9 C10 C11 C12 D13 D14 D15

A1 To reduce nutrient inputs to the sea to acceptable levels

A2 To preserve natural zones and biodiversity

A3 To reduce the use and impact of hazardous substances

A4 To become a model region for clean shipping A5 To mitigate and adapt to climate change To remove hindrances to the internal market B6 in the Baltic Sea Region including to improve cooperation in the customs and tax area

B7 To exploit the full potential of the region in research and innovation

Implementing the Small Business Act: To

B8 promote entrepreneurship, strengthen SMEs and increase the efficient use of

human resources

B9 To reinforce sustainability of agriculture, forestry and fisheries C10 To improve access to, and the efficiency and security of the energy markets C11 To improve internal and external transport links

To maintain and reinforce attractiveness C12 of the Baltic Sea Region in particular

through education, tourism and health

D13 To become a leading region in maritime safety and security D14 To reinforce protection from major emergencies at sea and on land D15 To decrease volume of, and harm done by, cross border crime

Total public funding (million €) committed on projects supporting EUSBSR by ERDF OPs and priorities South Finland

40 East Finland

35 West Finland

30 North Finland

25

20

15

10

5

0 Pr. 1 Pr. 2 Pr. 3 Pr. 4 Pr. 5

3.1.3.2. Contribution of the competitiveness and employment objective Operational Programme "Northern Finland" to the EUSBSR

Programme Description During programming period 2007-13, the total budget of the OP is around €1.1 billion, the Community assistance through the ERDF amounting to €311.3 million, which accounts for approximately 18% of the total Structural Funds (SF) money invested in Finland.

The region of Northern Finland, due to its permanent handicap caused by a sparse population and remoteness, benefits from a special allocation for sparsely populated areas of €35 per inhabitant per year from the ERDF, totalling €173 million during the programming period. The special allocation amount is included in the total amount of ERDF investment in the Programme.

The Programme aims to create 11 000 new jobs and 1 500 new enterprises. The aim is to use 25% of the financial framework for research and development (R&D) projects creating 1 000 new R&D jobs. 76.2% of the investment available has been earmarked for Lisbon-related expenditure, which is above the Community objective of 75% for regional competitiveness and employment regions.

The programme will be implemented through three main priorities and a technical assistance priority.

Priority 1: Promotion of business activity aims at developing productivity, creating more jobs and safeguarding existing jobs through supporting entrepreneurship and growth of enterprises and through improving access to business services and finance.

Priority 2: Promotion of innovation activity and networking, and reinforcing knowledge structures aims to activate expert networks with strong links to the national and international development projects of enterprises, universities, research institutes as well as regional businesses, and to support the creation and development of centres of excellence for key sectors.

Priority 3: Improving regional accessibility and operational environments aims to improve the accessibility and attractiveness of the region for businesses, employees and tourists by improving logistics and transport connections, services, the environment and tourist attractions.

Priority 4: Technical assistance will provide support for programme management and implementation, including technical support, communications and publicity, research and evaluation actions.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

In Northern Finland, the public funding contributes to the following Priority Areas of the EUSBSR: A1 (to reduce nutrient inputs to the sea to acceptable levels), A2 (to preserve natural zones and biodiversity), A4 (to become a model region for clean shipping), A5 (to mitigate and adapt to climate change), B7 (to exploit the full potential of the Region in research and innovation), B8 (implementing the Small Business Act: to promote entrepreneurship, strengthen small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and increase the efficient use of human resources), C10 (to improve access to, and the efficiency and security of the energy markets), C11 (to improve internal and external transport links), and C12 (to maintain and reinforce the attractiveness of the Baltic Sea Region in particular through education, tourism and health). The greatest amount of funding contributes to the A1, A4, C11 and A5 Priority Areas.

Examples of projects that support the EUSBSR in the Northern Finland OP:

Multiple use of Lake Kemijärvi and development of summer tourism, Reinforcing the natural salmon and sea trout populations in the River Iijoki (return of migratory fish species in the River Iijoki), Climate strategy for Lapland, Using bio-based reducing material in steel manufacturing processes, Innohaava (project on telemedicine for wounds), and WELMED (development of a research laboratory model for improvement of public health).

Tables and figures

Main Priority Area ERDF million €

Main Priority Area ERDF (million €) %

Innovation 0.899 3.6

Energy 0.413 1.7

Transport 4.001 16.2

Environment 17.520 70.8

Other 1.901 7.7

Total 24.733 100

Total EU Decided Amount funding projects remaining

Funding capacity of the OP North available (€) available

Finland (€) (€)

Axis 1 Promotion of business activity 111 836 001 65 245 456 46 590 545

Axis 2 Promotion of innovation activity and networking, and reinforcing knowledge structures 116 076 211 52 667 989 63 408 222 Axis 3 Improving regional accessibility and operational environments 70 910 014 38 610 469 32 299 545

Axis 4 Technical Assistance 12 450 926 6 646 680 5 804 246

195 3.1.3.3. Contribution of the competitiveness and employment objective Operational

Programme "Western Finland" to the EUSBSR

Programme description

The total budget of the Programme is around €398.4 million, the Community assistance through the ERDF amounting to €159.4 million, which accounts for approximately 9% of the total amount invested in Finland during programming period 2007-13.

The programme aims to create 9 800 new jobs and 2 000 new enterprises. The aim is to use 12.5% of the financial envelope for research and development (R&D) projects creating 150 new R&D jobs. From the investment available, 80.4% has been earmarked for Lisbon-related expenditure, which is above the Community objective of 75% for regional competitiveness and employment regions.

The programme will be implemented through four main priorities plus a Technical Assistance priority.

Priority 1 Promotion of business activity aims at developing productivity, creating more jobs and safeguarding existing jobs through supporting entrepreneurship and growth of enterprises and through improving access to business services and finance.

Priority 2 Promotion of innovation activity and networking, and reinforcing knowledge structures aims to activate expert networks with strong links to the national and international development projects of enterprises, universities, research institutes as well as regional businesses, and to support the creation and development of centres of excellence for key sectors.

Priority 3 Improving regional accessibility and operational environments will concentrate on three central areas: a) Improvement of regional accessibility and level of well being; b) Support for tourism and related business operating environments; and c) Environmental risk management and supporting nature diversity.

Priority 4 Development of larger urban areas will focus on developing knowledge-intensive sectors and the service sector, nurturing creativity, promoting the community spirit and improving the competitiveness of the large urban areas of Western Finland.

Priority 5 Technical assistance will provide support for programme management and implementation, including technical support, communications and publicity, research and evaluation actions.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

In Western Finland, public funding contributes to the following Priority Areas of the EUSBSR: A1 (to reduce nutrient inputs to the sea to acceptable levels), A2 (to preserve natural zones and biodiversity), A5 (to mitigate and adapt to climate change), B7 (to exploit the full potential of the Region in research and innovation), B8 (implementing the Small Business Act: to promote entrepreneurship, strengthen small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and increase the efficient use of human resources), C10 (to improve access to, and the efficiency and security of the energy markets), C11 (to improve internal and external transport links) and C12 (to maintain and reinforce the attractiveness of the Baltic Sea Region in particular through education, tourism and health). The greatest amount of funding contributes to the A1, A2, B5 and B7 Priority Areas.

Examples of projects that support the EUSBSR in the Western Finland OP:

Food consumption research project, Route for coastal tourism, Development of cultural heritage related to maritime issues

Tables and figures

Main Priority Area ERDF million €

Main Priority Area ERDF (million €) %

Innovation 0.704 17.5

Energy 0.218 5.4

Transport 0.200 5

Environment 1.975 49.2

Other 0.919 22.9

Total 4.016 100

Total EU Decided Amount funding projects remaining

Funding capacity of the OP West available (€) available

Finland (€) (€)

Axis 1 Promotion of business activity 56 531 659 32 045 491 24 486 168

Axis 2 Promotion of innovation activity and networking, and reinforcing knowledge structures 62 568 034 25 430 972 37 137 062 Axis 3 Improving regional accessibility and operational environments 27 062 555 7 723 091 19 339 464 Axis 4 Development of larger urban areas 6 838 568 2 156 098 4 682 470 Axis 5 Technical Assistance 6 375 034 3 672 903 2 702 131

197 3.1.3.4. Contribution of the competitiveness and employment objective Operational

Programme "Åland Islands" to the EUSBSR

Programme description

The total budget of the Programme is around €6.25 million, the Community assistance through the ERDF amounting to €3.125 million.

The programme aims to improve competitiveness in 50 existing enterprises and create 10 new enterprises. 30 new jobs will be created and 10 new products developed. 96% of the investment available has been earmarked for Lisbon-related expenditure, which is above the Community objective of 75% for regional competitiveness and employment regions.

The programme will be implemented through one main priority plus a technical assistance priority.

Priority 1 Business and innovation aims at developing productivity, creating more jobs and safeguarding existing jobs through supporting entrepreneurship, innovation and growth of enterprises by developing new products and ensuring that the added value among existing products is increased. Know-how and the technology level will be increased through skills transfer and investment in increasing international contacts.

Priority 2 Technical assistance will provide support for programme management and implementation, including technical support, communications and publicity, research and evaluation actions.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

All projects of the OP are supporting the EUSBSR. In total there are 18 projects and the ERDF amount totals €1.0 million.

Tables and figures

Examples of projects that support the EUSBSR in the Åland Finland OP:

Biogas plant

Total EU Decided Amount funding projects remaining

Funding capacity of the OP Åland available (€) available

Finland (€) (€)

Axis 1 Business and innovation 3 000 530 1 000 000 2 000 530

Axis 2 Technical Assistance 125 022 12 000 113 022

198 3.1.3.5. Contribution of the competitiveness and employment objective Operational

Programme "Eastern Finland" to the EUSBSR

Programme description

The total budget of the Programme is around €1.5 billion, the Community assistance through the ERDF amounting to €365.6 million, which accounts for approximately 21% of the total amount invested in Finland during programming period 2007-13. Eastern Finland has a "phasing-in" status, which means a strongly diminishing financing profile over the years 2007-13. Due to its permanent handicap caused by a sparse population and remoteness, the region benefits from a special allocation for sparsely populated areas of €35 per inhabitant per year from the ERDF, totalling €186 million during the programming period. The special allocation amount is included in the total amount of ERDF investment for the Programme.

The programme aims to create over 13 000 new jobs and over 2 000 new enterprises. The aim is to use 35% of the financial framework for research and development (R&D) projects creating 800 new R&D jobs. 86% of the investment available has been earmarked for Lisbonrelated expenditure, which is well above the Community objective of 75% for regional competitiveness and employment regions.

The programme will be implemented through three main priorities and a technical assistance priority.

Priority 1 Promotion of business activity aims at developing productivity, creating more jobs and safeguarding existing jobs through supporting entrepreneurship and growth of enterprises and through improving access to business services and finance.

Priority 2 Promotion of innovation activity and networking, and reinforcing knowledge structures aims to activate expert networks with strong links to the national and international development projects of enterprises, universities, research institutes as well as regional businesses, and to support the creation and development of centres of excellence for key sectors.

Priority 3 Improving regional accessibility and operational environments aims to improve the accessibility and attractiveness of the Region for businesses, employees and tourists by improving logistics and transport connections, services, the environment and tourist attractions.

Priority 4 Technical assistance will provide support for programme management and implementation, including technical support, communications and publicity, research and evaluation actions.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

In Eastern Finland the public funding contributes to the following Priority Areas of the EUSBSR: A1 (to reduce nutrient inputs to the sea to acceptable levels), A2 (to preserve natural zones and biodiversity), A3 (to reduce the use and impact of hazardous substances), A5 (to mitigate and adapt to climate change), B7 (to exploit the full potential of the Region in research and innovation), B8 (implementing the Small Business Act: to promote entrepreneurship, strengthen small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and increase the efficient use of human resources) and C12 (to maintain and reinforce the attractiveness of the Baltic Sea Region in particular through education, tourism and health). The greatest amount of funding contributes to the B7, A1 and C12 Priority Areas.

Tables and figures

Examples of projects that support the EUSBSR in the Eastern Finland OP:

ENWIN (applied environmental technology innovation and knowledge building), best practices in the Baltic Sea Area (networking, operational models)

Main Priority Area ERDF million €

Main Priority Area ERDF (million €) %

Innovation 12.193 55

Energy 0.007 0

Transport 0.000 0

Environment 5.699 25.7

Other 4.270 19.3

Total 22.170 100

Total EU Decided Amount funding projects remaining

Funding capacity of the OP East available (€) available

Finland (€) (€)

Axis 1 Promotion of business activity 156 257 285 75 676 377 80 580 908

Axis 2 Promotion of innovation activity and networking, and reinforcing knowledge structures 131 254 822 72 043 295 59 211 529 Axis 3 Improving regional accessibility and operational environments 63 429 630 36 555 535 26 874 095

Axis 4 Technical Assistance 14 622 572 7 089 840 7 532 732

200 3.1.3.6. Contribution of the competitiveness and employment objective Operational

Programme "Southern Finland" to the EUSBSR

Programme description

The total budget of the Programme is around €345.2 million, the Community assistance through the ERDF amounting to €138.1 million, which accounts for approximately 8% of the total Structural Fund money invested in Finland during programming period 2007-13.

The programme aims to create 4 200 new jobs and 920 new enterprises. The aim is to use 15.5% of the financial framework for research and development (R&D) projects creating 290 new R&D jobs. From the investment available, 81.6% has been earmarked for Lisbon-related expenditure, which is above the Community objective of 75% for regional competitiveness and employment regions.

The programme will be implemented through five main priorities plus a technical assistance priority.

Priority 1 Promotion of business activity aims at developing productivity, creating more jobs and safeguarding existing jobs through supporting entrepreneurship and growth of enterprises and through improving access to business services and finance.

Priority 2 Promotion of innovation activity and networking, and reinforcing knowledge structures aims to activate expert networks with strong links to the national and international development projects of enterprises, universities, research institutes as well as regional businesses, and to support the creation and development of centres of excellence for key sectors.

Priority 3 Improving regional accessibility and operational environments will concentrate on three central areas of emphasis concerning regional competitiveness: a) Improvement of logistics connections, including ICT connections; b) Environmental risk management and improvement of tourism operating conditions; and c) Accessibility and development of services and applications.

Priority 4 Development of larger urban areas will provide support to promote the attractiveness, sense of community and social cohesion of towns and create a pleasant and safe urban environment.

Priority 5 Thematic development at regional level aims to develop knowledge clusters in the area through broad, interregional umbrella projects. The themes are associated with the development of clusters, networks or sectors and pilot actions, for example to provide and ensure various services are in place.

Priority 6 Technical assistance will provide support for programme management and implementation, including technical support, communications and publicity, research and evaluation actions.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

In Southern Finland the public funding contributes to the following Priority Areas of the EUSBSR: A1 (to reduce nutrient inputs to the sea to acceptable levels), A2 (to preserve natural zones and biodiversity), A3 (to reduce the use and impact of hazardous substances), A4 (to become a model region for clean shipping), A5 (to mitigate and adapt to climate change), B6 (to remove hindrances to the internal market in the BSR, including to improve cooperation in the customs and tax area), B7 (to exploit the full potential of the Region in research and innovation), B8 (implementing the Small Business Act: to promote entrepreneurship, strengthen small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and increase the efficient use of human resources), C11 (to improve internal and external transport links), C12 (to maintain and reinforce the attractiveness of the Baltic Sea Region in particular through education, tourism and health), D13 (to become a leading region in maritime safety and security) and D14 (to reinforce protection from major emergencies at sea and on land).

The greatest amount of funding contributes to the A5, B7, C12 and B8 Priority Areas.

Tables and figures

Examples of projects that support the EUSBSR in the Southern Finland OP:

SÖKÖ II (action plan for maritime oil accidents), safety at sea projects (several), improvement of transport corridors in Southern Finland (including links to Russia)

Main Priority Area ERDF million €

Main Priority Area ERDF (million €) %

Innovation 4.703 29.1

Energy 0.002 0

Transport 1.884 11.7

Environment 6.117 37.9

Other 3.456 21.4

Total 16.162 100

Total EU Decided Amount funding projects remaining

Funding capacity of the OP South available (€) available

Finland (€) (€)

Axis 1 Promotion of business activity 31 422 130 19 500 778 11 921 352

Axis 2 Promotion of innovation activity and networking, and reinforcing knowledge structures 28 778 350 13 095 741 15 682 609 Axis 3 Improving regional accessibility and operational environments 28 601 716 9 177 743 19 423 973 Axis 4 Development of larger urban areas 6 627 030 3 144 118 3 482 912 Axis 5 Thematic development at regional level 37 111 366 11 961 975 25 149 391 Axis 6 Technical Assistance 5 522 525 2 977 621 2 544 904

202

3.1.4. Germany 2 (Total area: 357 108 km – Population: 81 802 257 inhabitants)

3.1.4.1. Analytical summary

General information on the contribution of the ERDF to the EUSBSR

Organisational measures taken in order to implement the EUSBSR

Following the federal structure of political and administrative form in Germany, the Managing Authorities in charge of the ERDF Operational Programmes (OPs) followed separated systems of "Labelling". In general, the Managing Authorities compared the contents of the EUSBSR Action Plan's priority axes with the respective OPs and found thematic overlaps. Except for pillar IV, a number of identical objectives could be identified. As a result, the Structural Fund measures were divided into a) measures directly contributing to the objectives of the EUSBSR Priority Areas, b) measures with indirect contribution and c) measures without any relevance to the EUSBSR objectives.

Particular changes in the contents of the OPs have not been undertaken nor are there any additional structures set up to adapt the Strategy. From the German point of view, the Strategy came up in the advanced stage of the OPs’ implementation, long after the selection and evaluation criteria for projects had been defined and decided. It was assessed that the relevant OPs fit into the Strategy and are sufficiently aligned, so that modification of the selection or evaluation criteria is not necessary. Nevertheless, a chapter on the performance of the EUSBSR is or will be included in the Annual Implementation Reports on the ERDF OPs. Contacts and exchange of information have been tightened up or established with authorities serving the territorial cooperation programmes.

Germany hosted inter alia the International Stakeholder Conference on the EUSBSR in February 2009, (Rostock) and the BSSSC-BALTEX Conference on 'Adapting to Climate Change – Case Studies from the Baltic Sea Region' in May 2011 (Hamburg).

Examples of projects contributing to the EUSBSR

The ERDF Operational Programmes in the area of the Baltic Sea contribute by their nature and defined priorities to a number of action fields contained in the Strategy. Projects within the areas R&D, innovation, environment, transport, Small Business Act and tourism, education, culture and health contribute meaningfully to achieving the aims of the Strategy.

Examples of projects:

– Clean Overspray – Development of an innovative, environment-friendly method for ship painting

– Maritime Cluster Schleswig-Holstein

– Rail Berlin-Rostock (T-Net) and additionally part of a new highway connecting the port in Rostock with transport nodal points

– Shift Lift Facility Niederfinow (T-Net)

– Highway A14 (T-Net)

Main problems encountered

No problems are specifically reported by the German authorities, but it appears that coordinating the development and the implementation of the process between NCPs, respective ministries and PACs, particularly the delivery mechanism and alignment of funding sources, are the main difficulties to overcome in Germany. In order to improve the coordination and cooperation between ministries, relevant meetings took place.

Beside this, the Länder repeatedly indicate that the extensive reporting on the basis of special indicators increases the administrative burdens and hinders the smooth flow of administrative actions. Additionally, in the current funding period, this requirement is difficult to fully meet as the monitoring systems were set up before the Strategy was launched. They would welcome an obligatory set of core indicators which is binding on the respective OPs and is proposed far enough in advance of the new programming period starting, so that sound OP preparation and comparability of results can take place. At the same time, this indicator set should fit in with macro-regional strategies.

Main lessons learned and what should be done in the future to improve links between programmes and the EUSBSR

There is a strong commitment to the Strategy on the political level. The political level deals with the Strategy through the Ministry for Foreign Affairs at the federal level and the Chancelleries in the respective German Länder, whereas the implementation of the ERDF OPs and the Baltic Sea Strategy on the operative level stays with the Managing Authorities (MAs) under the responsibility of the respective Ministries for Economics. The relationship between them is constructive, but there are some different priorities to be followed. Therefore a more coherent approach to the Strategy when preparing the next programming period OPs constitutes a significant attempt to improve the overall coherence of the strategic framework, the functioning of the delivery system and the performance in achieving the targeted results. For the upcoming programming period, it would be recommended that clear rules be set out for the use of Article 37 6) b) of Regulation 1083/2006 i.

MAs should reflect the increasing attention paid to the EUSBSR by giving the potential project applicants/beneficiaries concise information on how they can practically profit within the Strategy framework.

Description of the ERDF Operational Programmes

In the following, only OPs closely aligned with the EUSBSR are mentioned.

3.1.4.2. Description of the Operational Programme Transport

Programme Description

The ERDF contribution towards realising the priority axes selected for the joint action by the Community and the Member State, amounts to circa €1.5 billion for the programming period 2007-13.

Contents of the Operational Programme

The Operational Programme priority axes refer to the federal railroads, federal motorways and roads and federal waterways.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

Projects co-financed by the OP Transport support the Strategy as they are embedded into its objectives, in particular in improving the accessibility of the Region and the impact on the environment. Every axis of the OP contributes to achieving the objectives of the Strategy.

Flagship Projects

Highway A 14:

The first module approved: ca. €60 million

Further modules: major project applications in preparation

Railway Berlin-Rostock:

Programming period 2000-06: ca. €90 million ERDF

2007-13: the first module: €21 million approved

Further modules: major project applications in preparation

Other projects

Shift Lift Facility Niederfinow: €48.5 million approved

North Peene River: €15.4 million approved

By the end of 2010, the approved ERDF means from the OP Transport allocated to EUSBSR- relevant projects amounted to €121.6 million. For Flagship Projects: ca. €58 million.

Tables and figures

Total EU Decided Amount remaining Funding capacity of the OP funding projects available

Transport for Mecklenburgavailable (€) (€) Vorpommern (€)

Axis 1 Federal Railroads 714 550 200 310 100 000 404 450 200

Axis 2 Federal Highways 699 347 350 231 400 000 467 947 350

Axis 3 Federal Waterways 91 219 050 91 219 050 0 Total 1 505 116 600 632 719 050 872 397 550

3.1.4.3. Description of Operational Programme Schleswig-Holstein

Programme Description

The Land Schleswig-Holstein is located in the north-western part of the Federal Republic of Germany. Its ERDF programme includes Community support in the framework of the employment and competitiveness objective. The total budget for the Programme amounts to €1 091 083 094 with the Community contribution from the ERDF accounting for €373 888 769 (or approximately 1.41% of overall EU funding disbursed in Germany under the 2007– 13 cohesion policy).

Raising regional competitiveness and employment levels is the overriding objective and central pillar of all ERDF measures in Schleswig-Holstein. This objective is pursued through six strategic objectives which take account of the horizontal objectives of environment and equal opportunities.

The strategic objectives are: improving the acquisition of knowledge and knowledge transfer; making Schleswig-Holstein's economy more dynamic; consolidation of existing and developing structure clusters and networks; upgrading of facilities at regional locations; enhancing the role of the municipalities in support of social and economic change; developing the potential for boosting tourism and cultural activities.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

The objectives of the EUSBSR and the ERDF OP of S-H show numerous parallels. Except for pillar IV, Schleswig-Holstein links in with the Strategy. Projects within the areas of R&D, innovation, environment, transport, Small Business Act and tourism, education, culture and health contribute meaningfully to achieving the aims of the Strategy.

The allocation of the ERDF resources has an impact on the 15 priorities of the Action Plan. For the "Labelling", it was differentiated between projects contributing "by trend" and projects with a "concrete" contribution to the Strategy. The concrete contribution was determined on the basis of the descriptions of the respective projects. Those which best complied with the objectives of the Strategy (e.g. projects with more cooperation partners) have been defined as contributing directly and concretely (ERDF volume €44.6 million, total amount €95.2 million; ca. 25% of all supported projects in Schleswig-Holstein are concretely linked to the Strategy).

Tables and figures

Total EU Decided Amount funding projects remaining

Funding capacity of the OP available (€) available Schleswig-Holstein (€) (€) Axis 1 Enhancing knowledge and innovation 142 200 000 82 447 781.85 59 752 218.15 Axis 2 Improving competitiveness of enterprises 117 200 000 74 996 162.74 42 203 837.26 Axis 3 Improving the economic infrastructure and sustainable development 39 000 000 25 532 522.88 13 467 477.12 Axis 4 Development of specific regional potentials 63 600 000 22 326 616.14 41 273 383.86 Total 362 000 000 205 303 083.61 156 696 916.39

3.1.4.4. Description of Operational Programme Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

Programme Description

The Land Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is located in the north-eastern part of the Federal Republic of Germany. Its programme covers Community investment under the convergence objective. The overall budget of the Programme is some €1 670 million, including EU investment from the ERDF amounting to approximately €1 252 million (roughly 4.76% of all EU funding invested in Germany under cohesion policy over the period 2007-13).

The primary objective of the Programme is a sustainable increase in economic growth in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, by improving companies' innovativeness, entrepreneurial competitiveness and the attractiveness of the region as a place to conduct business.

Safeguarding and enhancing the competitiveness of the economy in Mecklenburg Vorpommern is an important part of ERDF support. The investments focus more heavily on innovation (EUSBSR Action Plan, pillar II). Mecklenburg-Vorpommern's development strategy for using ERDF funding reflects the objectives set out in Lisbon and Gothenburg (pillar I, II). The ERDF programme is also designed to stimulate equality of opportunity, to ensure non-discrimination and to boost sustainable urban development. Furthermore, development measures also take into account the challenges posed by demographic change. The aims of the Operational Programme are to strengthen and support innovation in business and society, make the regional economy more competitive and flexible, create a dynamic environment for investment and employment and make the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern region more attractive as a location for business and tourism activities (pillar III).

Contribution to the EUSBSR

The objectives of the EUSBSR and the ERDF OP of M-P show numerous parallels. Except for pillar IV, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern links in with the Strategy. Projects within the areas of R&D, innovation, environment, transport, Small Business Act and tourism contribute meaningfully to achieving the aims of the Strategy.

To find the best ways to comply with the EUSBSR priorities, regular consultation between the Managing Authority and the EU Commission as well as with the German ministries at the federal level takes place. Beside this, information events, communication and publicity actions, and the internet, are used to present the Strategy. Specific questions are being addressed in the Monitoring Committee for the ERDF OP.

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern coordinates the area "tourism" within PA 12 of the EUSBSR

Action Plan (http://www.baltic-sea-strategy-tourism.eu)

Tables and figures

ERDF investments contributing to the EUSBSR

Anteil von Maßnahmebereichen an den gesamten EFRE-Maßnahmen mit Bezug zur Ostseestrategie

18%

6% FuE und Innovation Umwelt Verkehr

7% Sonstiges ("Small Business Act", Tourismus)

69%

Anteile von Maßnahmebereichen mit und ohne Bezug

zur Ostseestrategie an den EFRE-Mitteln insgesamt

9% 3% 4%

46% FuE und Innovation

Umwelt Verkehr Sonstiges ("Small Business Act", Tourismus) EFRE ohne Bezug zur Ostseestrategie

38%

Total EU Decided Amount funding projects remaining

Funding capacity of the OP available (€) available

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern (€) (€)

Axis 1 Innovation, R&D, education 276 049 000 138 665 303.27 137 383 696.73 Axis 2 Improving competitiveness and adapting to the new conditions, in particular for SMEs 343 171 390 171 222 534.82 171 948 855.18 Axis 3 Improving investment possibilities, in particular for SMEs 167 900 000 112 626 760.64 55 273 239.36 Axis 4 Development of structures for sustainable growth 440 300 000 274 201 033.53 166 098 966.47 Total 1 227 420 390 696 715 632.26 530 704 757.74

3.1.4.5. Description of Operational Programme Hamburg

Programme Description

The Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg is located on the banks of the estuary of the River Elbe which flows to the North Sea. Its programme involves Community support under the regional competitiveness and employment objective. The programme's total budget is around €74.05 million, the Community assistance through the ERDF amounting to around €35.269 million (approximately 0.13% of the total EU Structural Funds available for Germany in 2007-13).

Hamburg has identified four strategic objectives for the Operational Programme: 'Reinforcing Hamburg as a location for application-oriented research and development', 'Increasing the competitiveness of the Hamburg economy', 'Consolidating existing and developing cluster structures and networks' and 'Integrated development of individual city areas'. The overall objective of the ERDF programme is to 'consolidate the position of Hamburg as an innovation-oriented city and enhance its international attractiveness for investors and workers' in conjunction with the image of Hamburg as a 'growing and green city'. In this respect, projects chosen for financing contribute significantly to the EUSBSR.

Hamburg is one of the more prosperous regions of the European Union. It is, however, conscious of the challenges set by demographic change, structural change and globalisation. Targeted investment support for business start-ups and SMEs in technological and scientific areas, promotion of investment in protection of the environment and in higher energy productivity, strengthening of existing and planned clusters, taking particular account of the industrial application of advanced and high technology, and also support for local economies in developing the potential of SMEs are the objectives of the OP. Through these objectives, Hamburg will make a noticeable contribution to the achievement of the Lisbon strategy objectives and the Gothenburg objectives of sustainability as well as to the EUSBSR.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

The OP amount for Hamburg is strongly limited. Nevertheless, Hamburg actively contributes to achieving the goals of the Strategy by supporting projects which are at the same time in line with its ERDF OP. The networking between research, the economy and enterprises shall be enhanced and the technology transfer improved. Projects directly contributing to the Strategy have also been identified within the environmental pillar.

The Managing Authority of the Hamburg OP cooperates actively with Hamburg's Senate Chancellery which is responsible for the Strategy within the Land of Hamburg. Beside this, a partnership with an INTERREG programme has been established in order to develop sustainable projects and create synergies.

Hamburg coordinates the area "education" within PA 12 of the EUSBSR Action Plan.

Tables and figures

Total EU Decided Amount funding projects remaining

Funding capacity of the OP available (€) available Hamburg (€) (€) Axis 1 Innovation and knowledgebased economy 25 600 000 8 766 210.21 16 833 789.79

Axis 2 Integrated and sustainable urban development 8 400 000 0 8 400 000

211

3.1.5. Latvia (Total area: 64 559 km 2 – Population: 2 248 374 inhabitants)

3.1.5.1. Analytical summary

The ERDF, CF and ESF budget for 2007-13 in Latvia is €4.53 billion.

In total, 2 232 out of 2 606 (or 85.64%) projects with valid contracts and ongoing activities in 2010 were identified within the three OPs – “Human Resources and Employment”, “Entrepreneurship and Innovations”, and “Infrastructure and Services”, covering the country at national level – which contributed to the EUSBSR in 2010 in Latvia. The division by cofunding source is as follows: 1 880 ERDF projects, 205 ESF projects, and 147 Cohesion Fund projects. The total ERDF investments in the respective projects in 2010 was €282 933 693.29; ESF – €46 456 734.31; Cohesion Fund – €218 913 119. 68.

Organisational measures taken in order to implement the EUSBSR

In 2009, all three Operational Programmes (OPs) were reviewed with the aim being to identify priorities and activities that could be labelled as contributing to the implementation of the EUSBSR Action Plan priorities. The Managing Authority has designed a “labelling” system, which follows some basic rules – if the objective of the activity contributes to the EUSBSR Action Plan priorities, each particular project of this activity also contributes to the EUSBSR. Therefore, no special criteria are needed to evaluate project contributions to the EUSBSR, because each project in the EUSBSR-earmarked activities would get an equal maximum number of points.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Latvia coordinates Latvia's involvement in implementing the Strategy at national level. A working group for the Strategy implementation was established by the Government in October 2009. The main task of the working group has been to ensure internal exchange of information, facilitate national Priority Area contact points’ cooperation with PACs, coordinate actions to identify and promote projects for inclusion in the Strategy’s Action Plan and better link Strategy-related initiatives with national strategic planning documents.

In order to promote the visibility of the Strategy, several communication and publicity actions have been carried out in Latvia. For example, on 9 June 2010 the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Turku INTERACT contact point jointly organised a seminar on the implementation of the EUSBSR. In September 2010, the 11th Baltic Economic Forum "The European Union Baltic Sea Strategy for the competitiveness of the Region" was organised in Riga. In September 2010, a study/book on the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region was presented by the Latvian Association of Political Scientists. The study was carried out with the support of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, European Commission Representation in Latvia and the Nordic Council of Ministers.

In 2010, technical assistance was used for participation in significant events in line with the implementation of the EUSBSR and its Action Plan.

The necessary steps have been taken to inform Latvian society about the EUSBSR. Information regarding the EU funds’ contribution to the EUSBSR implementation is included within annual reports on implementation of the OPs. Information is available on the EU funds’ homepage: http://www.esfondi.lv and on the homepage of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs: http://www.mfa.gov.lv/lv/eu/sadarbiba-baltijas-juras-regiona/bjs/ .

Main problems encountered

No problems are specifically reported, but it appears that coordination of the implementation of the Strategy must be improved.

A platform for discussion among the Strategy’s stakeholders has existed since the beginning of 2008 and has observed constantly growing awareness among the stakeholders regarding the Strategy. An initially cautious attitude and general interest in direct/immediate funding have been replaced by a deeper understanding of the Strategy’s regional role and tasks.

Main lessons learned and what should be done in the future to improve links between programmes and the EUSBSR

Real international cooperation within the EUSBSR has still not been achieved. The main lessons learned so far are: project ideas must be substantial, with a macro-regional scope; and project partners have to have adequate managerial experience and skills in regional networking, and an ability to attract and use different financial resources. For some lineministries, the recent shortage of both human and financial resources has been an obstacle to enough active involvement to promote the projects eligible for the Action Plan. In this regard, there is still a clear need for further political support within the national, regional and EU framework to maintain the current momentum and the stakeholders’ interest.

Tables and figures

Estimated contribution of the EU convergence objective OPs in Latvia to implementation of the EUSBSR based on the decided projects (for more detailed information, see factsheet by OP in Latvia)

Share of ESF investments contributing to Priority Areas of the Strategy (sum of projects contributing to the Strategy)

Main Priority Areas ESF amount, € R&D 12 474 989.32 Education 25 056 162.25 Human resources 8 925 582.74 Total 46 456 734.31

Projects supporting the implementation of the EUSBSR in Latvia by Fund

ERDF

Main Priority ERDF amount, Number of Areas projects R&D 10 813 344.00 135 Innovation 34 459 569.38 196

214 Education 51514 201.50 276

Health 28 302 478.61 66 Transport 99 996 325.90 175 ICT 22 390 527.44 155 Environment 26 127 707.84 176 Tourism 1 151 419.66 30 Energy 1 129 145.96 171 Total 282 933 693.29 1 880

Cohesion Fund

Main Priority Number of Areas CF amount, € projects Transport 102 457 782.96 7 Energy 6 275 334.09 119

Total 218 913 119.68 147

215 3.1.5.2. Description of Operational Programme ''Entrepreneurship and Innovations'' – Convergence Objective – Whole National Territory

Programme Description The total budget of the Programme is around €1.08 billion, the Community assistance through the ERDF amounting to €736.7 million (approximately 16% of the total EU money invested in Latvia under cohesion policy 2007-13). The OP aims to make considerable progress in science, innovation and entrepreneurship. It contributes to the use of knowledge and innovation, high value-added production, and enhanced export capacity for existing enterprises, as well as encouraging the formation of new knowledge-based and technology-intensive enterprises.

Contribution to the EUSBSR Three priorities of the OP are linked in with the Baltic Sea Strategy: Priority 1: Science and Innovation (60% of the OP resources), Priority 2: Access to Finance (23% of OP resources), and Priority 3: Promotion of Entrepreneurship (14% of the OP resources).

Tables and figures

EU Contribution to the OP Total Contribution

Contribution Allocated

Committed Committed Remaining amount amount by amount by to EUSBSR

to the OP amount March March by March

(€) 1 (€)

1 by March

2011 (€) 58 2011 (%) 2 2011 (€) 2011 (€) 2

OP

''Entrepreneurship 1 084 088 736 730 and Innovations'' 177 950

426 781 737 64.5 261 384 077 412 298 945

(96.6%) Priority 1:

Science and 708 999 804 466 042 185 850 536 Innovation 000

185 850 536 41.1 280 191 464

Priority 2: Access

to Finance 216 595 882

168 170

000 168 170 000 100.0 0 168 170 000

216 Entrepreneurship

Priority 4:

assistance

To contribute to the objectives of the EUSBSR Priority 7 ''To exploit the full potential of the Region in research and innovation" – the OP plans to promote entrepreneurship with higher value added by providing aid in developing and producing new products and technologies, and ensuring highly-qualified human resources in enterprises, and cooperation of the research

and business sectors.

For instance, within the activity of the OP “Competence Centres", five projects have been approved. Implementation of the activity will start in the first quarter of 2011. It is important to point out that competence centre activity is very significant as it is the first attempt by a project of such a large scale to bring together different industry partners and scientific partners. Among the approved competence centres, there are companies from sectors like chemistry, wood processing, metal processing, electrical engineering and space technologies. Approved competence centres within the Programme will conduct industrial research and experimental development in areas currently important for the whole industry in Latvia and worldwide. It is expected that this collaboration will result in new high added value products

and technologies.

Concerning the activity “Development of new products and technologies", one of the successes within this activity is the pharmaceutical company JSC “Grindeks" which is conducting industrial research. Using the knowledge base gained, it will conduct experimental development to create new medicines. To carry out research, high level

specialists are involved.

In order to contribute to objectives of the EUSBSR Priority 8 ''Implementing the Small Business Act; to promote entrepreneurship, strengthen SMEs and increase the efficient use of human resources'', the OP plans to promote economic activity and enhance competitiveness by setting up new enterprises and strengthening existing enterprises. There are further plans to facilitate access to financial resources to enhance business development, at the same time reducing the negative effects of direct state aid on market competition and achieving a more efficient use of state aid assets by exploiting them repeatedly for business development or applying a multiplier. Under the activity “Business incubators", the creative incubator in Riga can be considered particularly successful. The support from EU funds is provided to micro and small enterprises established in Latvia. Nevertheless, these small enterprises are usually involved in international networks. There are around 40 small enterprises in the incubator at

the moment.

3.1.5.3. Description of Operational Programme ''Infrastructure and Services'' – Convergence Objective – Whole National Territory

Programme Description The total budget of the Programme is around €4 billion and includes Community funding through the ERDF and CF amounting to €3.2 billion (approximately 70% of the total EU money invested in Latvia under cohesion policy 2007-13). The OP aims to promote the accessibility and attractiveness of the country for both entrepreneurs and citizens in Latvia, and ensure sustainable development and progress towards a knowledge-based economy. Efforts will also focus on providing quality education

217 as well as a quality working and living environment. In terms of economic development, the OP aims to ensure sufficient infrastructure and public services combined with a competitive business environment.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

Six priorities of the OP are in line with the EUSBSR: Priority 1: Infrastructure for Strengthening Human Capital (15.0% of the OP resources); Priority 2: Promotion of Territorial Accessibility (14.9% of the OP resources); Priority 3: Development of a Transport Network of European Significance and Promotion of Sustainable Transport (25.0% of the OP resources); Priority 4: Quality Living and Business Environment (11.3% of the OP resources); Priority 5: Promotion of Environmental Infrastructure and Environmentally Friendly Energy (24.0% of the OP resources); Priority 6: Polycentric Development (7.7% of the OP resources).

Priorities of the OP that give the largest financial contribution to the EUSBSR are transport and environment, with €202 454 107 and 110 180 002 respectively.

The transport priority makes a substantial contribution to the EUSBSR Priority Area 11 "To improve internal and external transport links", while the environment priority is linked with the EUSBSR Priority Areas 1 "To reduce nutrient inputs to the sea to acceptable levels", 2 "To preserve natural zones and biodiversity, including fisheries", and 3 "To reduce the use and impact of hazardous substances".

The OP “Infrastructure and Services” aims at improving the transport sector by fostering the development of high-quality, safe transport infrastructure integrated in the common transport system of Eurasia that would facilitate national economic growth, accessibility of the country as a whole and also its separate areas, as well as development of environmentally sustainable transport systems.

For the preservation of the quality of the environment, the OP proposes to use natural resources rationally and reduce environmental pollution respecting the “polluter pays” principle, in order to protect the health of society and ensure sustainable development. Meeting the requirements and objectives of the EU legislation pertaining to environment protection, rehabilitation of contaminated sites and prevention of environmental risk, will not only make individual parts of the country’s territories more attractive to investors and visitors but also guarantee residents the required quality of life.

It is planned also to improve the quality of the health care service in order to enhance efficient medical treatment processes, optimise the number and location of health care providers, and perform medical treatment of higher quality, thus ensuring a faster return of the workforce to the labour market.

The OP “Infrastructure and Services” also adds to the education priority, fostering the efficient use of human capital as the most substantial resource in the Latvian economy, increasing competitiveness and employment indicators by improving infrastructure and equipment in education systems and by providing higher quality services to society.

To improve the energy sector and to contribute to the objectives of the EUSBSR Priority Areas 5 “To mitigate and adapt to climate change” and 10 “To improve the access to, and the efficiency and security of the energy markets”, the OP plans to promote efficient heating systems by renovating district heating or combined heat and power facilities, promote energy-efficient housing in the residential sector and public buildings, and increase the usage of renewable energies.

It is planned to promote the development of an information society and knowledge-based economy, including improving the efficiency of the Public Administration, to facilitate the development of e-services, information systems and integration, to promote accessibility of information and services by facilitation of accessibility to Internet and broadband network infrastructure, thus increasing the general population’s opportunity to participate in different social processes, so as to improve the ICT sector and to contribute to the objectives of the EUSBSR Priority Area 11 “To improve internal and external transport links” within the OP “Infrastructure and Services”.

The OP contributes to the objectives of the EUSBSR Priority Area 12 “To maintain and reinforce the attractiveness of the Baltic Sea Region in particular through education and youth, tourism, culture and health” and to the improvement of the tourism sector, fostering competitiveness and creating favourable conditions for complex development of tourism products and services.

Tables and figures

EU Contribution to the OP

Total Committed Remaining Contribution

Contribution Allocated

Committed

amount amount by amount by to the

to the OP (in amount (in by March March March 2011 EUSBSR by

€) 3 €)

3

2011 (in €) 59 2011 (%) 4 (in €) March 2011 (in €) 4

OP

''Infrastructure 3 888 137 104 3 210 612 2 366 938 and Services'' 967

2 451 842 585 76.4 758 770 382 948

Priority 1:

Human 589 847 095 504 623 236 416 131

Capital 944

82.5 88 491 292 368 845 881

Priority 2:

Territorial 572 060 939 511 190 662 379 997 460 74.3 131 193 202 379 997 460 Accessibility

Priority 3:

Sustainable 1 008 195 825 856 966 451 824 562 379 96.2 32 404 072 824 562 379 Transport

Priority 4:

Env for Life

and Eco 424 353 751 322 906 364 143 489 449 44.4

179 416

915 143 489 449

Activity

Priority 5:

Env

Infrastructure 900 921 086 670 610 102 450 345 379 67.2 220 264

Friendly 723

450 345 379

Energy

Priority 6:

Polycentric 322 948 363 274 506 107 199 698 400 72.7 74 807 707 199 698 400 Devt

Priority 7: TA

ERDF 57 610 045 57 610 045 33 002 933 57.3 24 607 112 0

220

3.1.6. Lithuania (Total area: 65 300 km 2 - Population: 3 329 039 inhabitants)

3.1.6.1. Analytical summary

ERDF, CF and ESF programmes in Lithuania: Implementation process

Organisational measures taken in order to implement the EUSBSR

In order to ensure an efficient and successful implementation of the EUSBSR in Lithuania, a National Commission for the Supervision of the Implementation of the European Union Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region was established by Decision No 133 of 10 February 2010 of the Lithuanian Government “On the Implementation and Coordination of the European Union Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region in Lithuania”.

The National Commission is made up of responsible public authorities and bodies including those involved in the administration of EU structural assistance as well as representatives of the social and economic partners. Functioning as a platform, the National Commission allows representatives of different sectors and institutions to share their experience in implementing the EUSBSR and together seek solutions for overcoming emerging obstacles and difficulties. In 2010, the National Commission held three meetings where a number of issues such as the progress and difficulties in the implementation of the EUSBSR, the contribution of different financial instruments and programmes to the implementation of the EUSBSR and ways of enhancing the visibility of the Strategy were discussed.

It does not appear that any particular changes, other than the reference to the Strategy, have been made to the programmes. The Ministry of Finance has commissioned an evaluation of the implementation of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region by mobilising the EU Structural Funds for the period 2007–13.

Following this evaluation, it is generally considered that the programmes and the Strategy are sufficiently aligned. One of the recommendations was to introduce a new specific selection criterion for projects falling under measures considered as making a direct contribution to the EUSBSR. However, to date this recommendation has not been taken up.

Examples of projects contributing to the EUSBSR

Several of the projects highlighted by the Lithuanian authorities fall within the environment sector and include cases such as the establishment of a centre for hydrogen energy technologies, the construction of a combined heat and power plant using renewable energy sources and the renovation and development of the infrastructure for water supply and waste water management.

Moreover, projects in the field of technological innovation (creation of a prototype for a 9 GHz bandwidth optical sampling oscilloscope (OS9G)) and in transport (expansion of the Kaunas Airport passenger terminal bringing it in line with Schengen requirements) are mentioned as contributing to the EUSBSR.

Main problems encountered

No problems are specifically reported. However, coordinating the development and the implementation of the process between NCPs, Ministries and PACs, political involvement, the delivery mechanism and alignment of funding sources are most likely the main difficulties to be overcome.

On 31 May 2010 in Vilnius, the Ministry of Finance together with the Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth (Tillväxtverket) and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) organised a meeting “Implementation of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region”. Representatives from Lithuania, Latvia, Sweden, Finland and Germany directly involved in EU structural assistance and the implementation of the EUSBSR took part and various aspects of the EUSBSR funding were discussed. During this meeting, an informal Network for the Funding of the Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region was established.

Main lessons learned and what should be done in the future to improve links between programmes and the EUSBSR

In July 2010, the Lithuanian Government adopted a decision on the compatibility of EU financial measures and programmes with the objectives and priorities of the EUSBSR in relation to the next programming period.

In this context, a protocol decision was adopted by which authorities responsible for the administration of relevant EU financial measures are charged, when preparing the programming documents for the new period (2014–20), with ensuring a close alignment with the EUSBSR objectives and Priority Areas set out in its Action Plan. This should be done through the establishment of project selection criteria in relation to the EUSBSR at the level of all programmes which will grant priority to projects contributing to the implementation of the EUSBSR (given the project complies with other relevant project requirements).

Additionally, these provisions will apply not only to mainstream programmes but also to other EU financial measures and programmes such as the European territorial cooperation objective, Lithuanian rural development and fisheries programmes, as well as the Trans European Energy Network (TEN-E) and the Trans-European Transport Network programmes, etc., that can make a significant contribution to the implementation of the Strategy.

Estimated contribution of the EU convergence objective OPs in Lithuania to the implementation of the EUSBSR based on the decided projects (for more detailed information, see 3.2.2.2-3.2.2.3 which includes information at programme level)

Priority Areas of the Strategy ESF+ERDF+CF amount (€ million) Research and technological 247.67 development (RTD) Innovation 63.49 Energy 31.56 Transport 843.54 Environment 1 219.65 Business 61.52 Tourism 2.36 Education, learning 38.61 Internal market 1.01 Total: 2 509.41

3.1.6.2. Contribution of the convergence objective Promotion of Cohesion Operational Programme (2007LT161PO001) to the EUSBSR

Programme Description

The Promotion of Cohesion Operational Programme is co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund (€1 475 million) and the Cohesion Fund (€1 172 million) under the convergence objective.

The OP aims at improving standards of living throughout the country from an economic and social point of view. This should provide a basis for stable sustainable economic development in the long term. Key objectives are: to create preconditions for strengthening and unfolding the potential of local development; to ensure accessible, high-quality public services provided by health care, education and state employment promotion policy institutions, noninstitutional social services and services to the disabled; and to improve the environment, with a focus on improving energy efficiency.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

Looking at the OP in the light of the EUSBSR, the absolute majority of projects contribute to the implementation of Priority Area 5 of the Action Plan (to mitigate and adapt to climate change). To a certain extent, a contribution is also made to Priority Area 12 (to maintain and reinforce the attractiveness of the Baltic Sea Region in particular through education, youth, tourism, culture and health).

By 31 December 2010, a total of 747 projects directly contributed to the implementation of the EUSBSR to which more than €1 189 million had been allocated. The vast majority of projects (740) are being implemented in the field of environmental protection. Implementation of various projects related to the improvement of energy efficiency through renovation and modernisation of multi-dwelling buildings, preservation of biodiversity, remediation of water bodies and sites contaminated with hazardous substances, water supply and waste water management, waste management, and usage of renewable energy sources, etc. contributes to the improvement of environmental quality, mitigation of climate change and promotion of sustainable development. Furthermore, several projects related to the improvement of the image of Lithuania’s tourism in foreign markets and the introduction of tourism opportunities in Lithuania at international tourism events with the aim of attracting tourists to the region, etc. are also being implemented.

Consequently, the biggest contributions to the implementation of the EUSBSR are made within Priority Axis 4 (Environment and sustainable development), followed by Priority Axis 1 (Local and urban development, preservation of cultural heritage and protection of nature and its adaptation to the development of tourism).

Tables and figures

Main Priority Number of projects Number of projects ERDF + CF amount Areas of the contributing to the directly contributing allocated in Strategy implementation of the to the accordance with Flagship initiatives implementation of signed contracts (€

referred to in the the EUSBSR million) EUSBSR Action Plan

Environment – 740 1 186.91 Tourism – 7 2.36 Total by areas: 747 1 189.27

Environm ent

37.2% Tourism

O ther part of O P PC

62.6%

0.1%

Amount Total EU Decided remaining Funding capacity of the OP funding projects available Promotion of Cohesion available (€) (€) (€)

Priority Axis 1: Local and urban development, protection of cultural heritage and nature and its adaptation to development of 600 196 245 582 tourism 845 778 316 258 058 Priority Axis 2: Quality and availability of public services: health care, education and social 456 140 173 469 infrastructure 629 609 905 401 504 Priority Axis 3: Environment and 1 128 119 966 912 161 207 sustainable development 555 142 413 Priority Axis 4: Technical assistance 44 824 795 16 597 745 28 227 050 2 648 332 2 039 846 608 486 Total 571 546 025

3.1.6.3. Contribution of the convergence objective Economic Growth Operational

Programme (2007LT161PO002) to the EUSBSR

Programme Description

The Economic Growth Operational Programme is co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund (€1 966 million) and the Cohesion Fund (€1 132 million) under the convergence objective.

The OP aims at speeding up economic growth in the long term so as to close the development gap between Lithuania and the EU average. The main objectives are to increase the share of high value added businesses, boost productivity, particularly by creating favourable conditions for innovation and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and improve the efficiency of the economic infrastructure.

Contribution to the EUSBSR

Looking at the OP in the light of the EUSBSR, the biggest contribution is made to the following Priority Areas of the EUSBSR Action Plan: to exploit the full potential of the Region in research and innovation (Priority Area 7), implementing the Small Business Act: to promote entrepreneurship, strengthen SMEs and increase the efficient use of human resources (Priority Area 8), and to improve internal and external transport links (Priority Area 11). By 31 December 2010, a total number of 823 projects directly contributing to the implementation of the EUSBSR and to which €1 263.42 million were allocated have been implemented. The majority of projects (375) are being implemented in the business sector and are aimed at: finding foreign partners and expanding businesses into foreign markets (such as the countries belonging to the Commonwealth of Independent States); trade promotion; attraction of foreign direct investment and capital; and enhancement and improvement of the economic image of Lithuania in foreign markets with the aim of attracting more investment into the region, etc.

Although a large share of projects is implemented in the business sector, the largest projects are nevertheless implemented in the fields of transport, research and technological development (RTD) and innovation. Implementation of transport-related projects includes improvement, modernisation and development of road, rail, sea and international airport infrastructure, development of transport links with other EU Member States, and enhancing the safety of traffic users, etc. By the end of 2010, funding was given to one project which is part of the “Via Baltica” priority project provided for in the EUSBSR Action Plan under the Flagship initiative “Accomplish the development of the agreed priority transport infrastructures”.

In the field of RTD and innovation, the implementation of projects is related to improvement of the international competitiveness of the country’s industry, development of the infrastructure for carrying out world-class scientific and applied research of international importance, setting up of EU and world-class laboratories, manufacture of new innovative products, creation of clusters, development in the region, etc. Funding is also allocated to energy projects that are implemented with the aim of modernising power transmission systems and transformer stations and constructing new power lines, thus enabling successful implementation of power links with other countries (for example, Sweden), and to environmental projects aimed at the modernisation of heating systems and increased reliability and efficiency of heating supply.

The biggest contribution to the implementation of the EUSBSR is made within Priority Axis 5 (Development of the Trans-European Transport Networks), followed by Priority Axis 4 (Basic economic infrastructure) and Priority Axis 1 (Scientific research and technological development for the competitiveness and growth of the economy).

Tables and figures

Main Priority Areas Number of projects Number of projects ERDF+CF amount of the Strategy contributing to the directly contributing allocated in implementation of the to the accordance with Flagship initiatives implementation of signed contracts (€ referred to in the the EUSBSR million) EUSBSR Action Plan Research and – 29 230.57 technological development (RTD) Innovation – 190 63.49 Energy – 8 31.56 Transport 1 170 843.54 Environment – 50 32.74 Business – 375 61.52 Total by areas: 1 822 1 263.42

12.3% RTD

32.9% 3.4% Innovation

Transport

Energy

3.3% Environm ent

1.7% 1.7% Business

44.8% O ther part of the O PEG

Total EU Amount Funding capacity OP Economic funding Decided remaining Growth available (€) projects (€) available (€) Priority Axis 1: R&D for competitiveness and growth of business 534 187 373 337 730 558 196 456 815 Priority Axis 2: Increasing business productivity and improving environment for business 605 529 144 515 301 523 90 227 621 Priority Axis 3: Information

Society for all 240 086 875 134 334 397 105 752 478

Priority Axis 4: Basic economic infrastructure 586 758 740 444 164 334 142 594 406 Priority Axis 5: Development of

Trans-European Transport 1 087 466

Networks 598 503 312 692 584 153 906

Priority Axis 6: Technical assistance 44 824 795 17 022 368 27 802 427

Total 525 872 1 146 987 653

227

3.1.7. Poland (Total area: 312 685 km 2 - Population: 38 167 329 inhabitants)

Implementation process in Poland

The implementation process of the EUSBSR in Poland is well under way. Although the feeling of ownership varies among the stakeholders, the EUSBSR is generally perceived as a necessary and important instrument that has the potential to help the Region prosper and address its needs through growing macro-regional cooperation. Despite the unquestionable vitality of the Region manifesting itself in a number of regional initiatives, only the EUSBSR covers such a wide range of crucial issues while using the possibilities created by the EU. A variety of different actors including governments, inter-governmental organisations, regional and local authorities as well as private organisations makes the EUSBSR even more valuable and tailored to the needs we are to respond to. A number of important events referring to the Strategy took place in Poland, among them the VASAB Annual Conference “Integrated Approach to Spatial Development of Europe – Meaning of Territorial Cohesion” and the Second Working Meeting on the Implementation of the EUSBSR (February 2011). The most important upcoming events in 2011 will be the Second Annual Forum of the EUSBSR together with the Baltic Development Forum Summit.

Although there are no major obstacles in the implementation process experienced by Polish Priority Area Coordinators and Flagship Project Leaders, overall progress varies depending on the specific Priority Area or Flagship Project. Some projects are already progressing very well (e.g. "A network of centres of excellence for maritime training" – 13.5), others due to the recent changes in the leadership are in a start-up phase (e.g. "Deeper cooperation on environmental technology to create new business opportunities" – 8.2). On the other hand, the project 8.6 "Make the Baltic Sea a leader in design" has not been initiated yet due to financial problems.

The EUSBSR has triggered regular meetings between the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Polish stakeholders and allowed for a current exchange of information in working contacts. The meetings resulted in better awareness of the National Contact Point about the initiatives taken on the ground. Participation in international meetings on the EUSBSR helps to have a better understanding of numerous initiatives taking place in the Baltic Sea Region. The cooperation with the Ministry of Regional Development, responsible for coordination of cohesion policy implementation, has been intensified.

Lessons learned and ideas for next steps

Despite the generally positive impression that the EUSBSR is already giving, there are lessons that can be drawn. There is the feeling we need to ensure sustained high-level political pressure on the EUSBSR and stronger ownership on all levels, including National Contact Points. What is needed is stronger clarification of the responsibilities on all levels. Financing of the projects also needs further attention.

Apart from the meetings with all Polish stakeholders, separate meetings with each of the stakeholders, with the MRD’s participation, are necessary for focusing on specific problems. The MFA has started the procedure of setting up an inter-ministerial commission on the EUSBSR.

The review process of the EUSBSR should tackle the following:

  • improvement of the management process;
  • further defining the roles of the stakeholders on all levels;
  • clear monitoring system and targets;
  • strengthening the coordination between policies on national and EU level influencing the macro-region.

Quantitative analysis

Within all Operational Programmes (OP) within the National Strategic Reference Framework in the areas related to the Baltic Sea Strategy, there were 28 559 financing agreements signed for €31 billion worth of EU co-financing, which means that about 80% of the total value of agreements signed contributing to the realisation of the Strategy.

Strategy-related projects financed by the ERDF and Cohesion Fund concerned: transport infrastructure – €12.8 billion (42%), R&D and innovation – €5.1 billion (16%), environment – €4.3 billion (14%), education, tourism and health – €4 billion (13%), entrepreneurship, SMEs and human capital – €3.7 billion (12%) and energy – €0.8 billion (3%).

Investment co-financed by the ERDF and Cohesion Fund for the EUSBSR

13% 16%

R&D, Innovation

3%

12% Energy

Transport

Environment

Enterpreneurship, support for SMEs, human capital

14% Education, tourism, health

42%

The rate of contribution differs among programmes: from 35% within OP Human Capital (co-financed by the ESF) to nearly 100% in the case of the South Baltic programme (ETC).

100%

80%

60% 95%

40% 85%

94% 99%

78%

20% 48% 35%

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Cohesion policy in Poland

General information

The whole area of Poland belongs to the convergence objective of the EU cohesion policy. During the 2007–13 period, Poland is implementing 20 Operational Programmes (OP) financed by the ERDF and Cohesion Fund: four national programmes (managed by central administration) and 16 regional programmes (managed by regional administration). National programmes finance major investment aimed at development of infrastructure in the areas of transport, energy and environment, culture and health (OP Infrastructure and Environment) or research and development and innovation (OP Innovative Economy). While OP Innovative Economy and OP Infrastructure and Environment cover the whole country, OP Development of Eastern Poland is focused on five regions in Poland with the lowest GDP per capita (Warnińsko-Mazurskie, Podlaskie, Lubelskie, Świętokrzyskie, Podkarpackie). OP Technical assistance (not described in this report) is aimed at building administrative capacity. 16 regional programmes – one programme per region – support complementary investments, both infrastructural and aimed at the knowledge-based economy (business environment; direct support for SMEs; loan and guarantee funds). Territorial cooperation programmes facilitate international cooperation. In the context of the EUSBSR, the OP South Baltic plays a special role. Apart from the ERDF and Cohesion Fund programmes, there is also the ESF- financed OP Human Capital.

Allocation

Over the period 2007–13, Poland will receive €67.3 billion or 19.4% of the total €347.4 billion allocation for regional policy. Out of this, €22 billion goes to the Cohesion Fund, €9.7 billion to the ESF, €34 billion to the ERDF and €1.3 billion to the performance reserve. Poland will receive another €13.2 billion under rural development policy (EAFRD) and €734 million under the European Fisheries Fund (EFF). At the end of 2011, an allocation of additional resources (€1 billion for the performance reserve and €0.6 billion for technical adjustment) will be available for Polish programmes.

Availability of funds

By March 2011, the value of contracts signed amounted to nearly €34.8 billion (EU cofinancing) or 62.3% of CF and ERDF allocations (€55.5 billion). In terms of contracts signed, regional programmes with 74% of allocations were more advanced than national OPs (58% contracted). However, taking into account applications approved for financing, the estimated use of allocation reaches 77%. In fact – taking additionally into account applications submitted in ongoing calls for proposals and key projects approved – the resources available would be much lower. The allocation of the performance reserve will add additional funding.

Estimated availability of funding

Applications approved

Allocation for financing

Grant agreements

Operational Programme 2007-13 Estimated

(€) EU EU contribution Use of contribution Use of Amount

(€) allocation (€) allocation remaining*

1 2 3 4 5 6=1-4 8 254 885 7 141 884 5 720 021 2 534 863 Innovative Economy 280 304 86.52% 364 68.87% 916 Infrastructure and 27 913 683 19 198 578 15 497 677 12 416 005 Environment 774 457 68.78% 860 55.31% 914

9 707 176 8 342 268 5 793 540 3 913 635 Human Capital 000 964 85.94% 372 59.06% 628 Technical Assistance 516 700 000 263 586 823 51.01% 294 009 613 56.23% 222 690 387

Poland 750 040 67.20% 016 58.49% 934 628 734

231

Territorial Cooperation 406 998 795 239 435 196 58.83% 145 382 624 42.43% 261 616 171 Total: national 49 073 237 36 582 024 28 789 796 20 283 440 programmes 599 519 74.55% 849 58.41% 750

Regional OP for 1 213 144 1 031 947 Dolnośląskie 879 371 85.06% 821 811 618 67.22% 391 333 261 Regional OP for Kujawsko Pomorskie 951 003 820 790 483 017 83.12% 716 411 454 74.74% 234 592 366 1 155 854 Regional OP for Lubelskie 549 846 320 066 73.22% 730 187 871 62.84% 425 666 678 Regional OP for Lubuskie 439 173 096 449 748 865 102.41% 375 837 982 84.35% 63 335 114 1 006 380 Regional OP for Łódzkie 910 857 068 849 85.16% 776 011 623 76.44% 230 369 287 1 290 274 1 151 005 1 036 082 Regional OP for Małopolskie 402 347 89.21% 858 79.64% 254 191 544 Regional OP for 1 831 496 1 272 985 1 077 217 Mazowieckie 698 791 69.51% 227 58.44% 754 279 471 Regional OP for Opolskie 427 144 813 476 746 449 111.61% 412 003 832 94.68% 15 140 981 Regional OP for 1 136 307 1 004 961 Podkarpackie 823 485 88.44% 853 652 983 74.59% 282 654 840 Regional OP for Podlaskie 636 207 883 582 386 698 91.54% 501 440 883 78.08% 134 767 000 Regional OP for Pomorskie 885 065 763 999 393 564 112.92% 843 606 775 94.42% 41 458 988 1 712 980 1 386 843 1 112 022 Regional OP for Śląskie 303 726 80.96% 933 64.54% 600 957 370 Regional OP for Świętokrzyskie 725 807 266 541 146 015 74.56% 472 353 383 64.50% 253 453 883 Regional OP for Warmińsko 1 036 542 Mazurskie 041 854 641 458 82.45% 760 725 731 72.89% 275 816 310 Regional OP for 1 272 792 1 297 606 1 258 367 Wielkopolskie 644 758 101.95% 632 97.78% 14 425 012 Regional OP for Zachodniopomorskie 835 437 299 640 428 235 76.66% 588 907 394 69.89% 246 529 905 16 555 614 14 172 386 12 336 642 4 218 972 Total for Regional OPs 189 804 85.60% 179 73.91% 010 65 628 851 50 624 738 41 126 439 24 502 412 TOTAL NSRF 788 424 77.14% 027 62.33% 761 *The amount takes into account only grant agreements signed (and not applications approved for realisation or projects under appraisal).

Actions to improve implementation of the EUSBSR undertaken by Polish OPs

Managing Authorities for Polish national and regional programmes undertook several actions aimed at improving the realisation of the Strategy.

National programmes reported:

  • participation in meetings devoted to monitoring the EUSBSR realisation by Operational Programmes and setting up the monitoring system;
  • representatives of OP Human Capital participating in the Baltic States Cooperation network devoted to international cooperation projects in the Baltic Sea Region;
  • discussions during monitoring committees and information and promotion actions aimed at raising awareness of beneficiaries of OP South Baltic;
    • implementation system;
  • modification of selection criteria promoting international cooperation in the Baltic Sea Region within OP Human Capital;
  • OP South Baltic introduced several actions including consultations for beneficiaries provided by employees of information points on a project's impact on the Strategy, amendments to the Programme's manual and application form, introduction of the strategic criterion on compliance with the Strategy and a possibility of imposing conditionality (related to the Strategy) on beneficiaries by a steering committee.

Regional programmes declared:

  • participation in meetings devoted to the Strategy (regions: Pomorskie, Łódzkie, Mazowieckie, Zachodniopomorskie);
  • active participation in conferences dedicated to the Strategy in Riga and Tallinn (regions: Pomorskie, Zachodiopomorskie);
  • presentation of the Strategy at the Monitoring Committee meeting of the OP (regions: Lubelskie, Podlaskie, Zachodniopomorskie, Warmińsko-Mazurskie, Pomorskie); in Pomorskie the Strategy was presented by counterparts from other countries;
  • preparation of recommendations for Operational Programmes ('Guidance note – EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region. Practical suggestions for the Operational Programmes');
  • modification of the Operational Programmes by adding reference to the EUSBSR within the midterm review in 2011 (regions: Małopolskie, Zachodiopomorskie, Pomorskie, Podlaskie);
  • modification of the application form (region: Podlaskie);
  • strategic assessment of the compliance of projects with the EUSBSR (region: Warmińsko-Mazurskie);
  • involvement in the international initiatives in the region (region: Zachodniopomorskie in BSSSC) or networks aimed at improved realisation of the EUSBSR (region: Mazowieckie in the network dedicated to financial issues).

Conclusions, recommendations, next steps:

National programmes:

  • prepare evaluations dedicated to realisation of the Strategy by OP Innovative Economy and OP Infrastructure and Environment;
  • information campaign for beneficiaries of OP Innovative Economy.

Regional programmes:

  • information and promotion campaigns;
  • allocation of additional funds from the National Performance Reserve and Technical adjustment for measures/priorities meeting the objectives of the EUSBSR and organisation of calls for proposals in these areas;
  • enforcing cooperation with Priority Area Coordinators;
  • participation in meetings, conferences and networks related to realisation of the Strategy;
  • identification of projects/initiatives in the area of the EUSBSR (a/a innovation, energy, transport);
  • adding reference to the Strategy within the midterm review.

Examples of projects realising the EUSBSR supported by cohesion policy

Cohesion policy has actively supported implementation of the Baltic Sea Strategy. Behind the numbers, one can observe numerous projects pursuing the objectives of smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, which were financed by the European Regional Development Fund,

Cohesion Fund and European Social Fund, at national and regional level, by mainstream and territorial cooperation programmes.

Smart growth means creative use of resources for the sake of the innovative economy. The projects strived to develop modern sectors like nanotechnologies (a research centre of the

Technical University of Gdańsk, OP Infrastructure and Environment), pharmaceuticals (implementation of research in chemistry, OP Innovative Economy) or biotechnologies

(South Baltic programme) as well as revive the potential of traditional sectors like the woodworking and paper industry by patents (regional programme in Lubelskie) or cooperative networks (South Baltic programme). Several projects were aimed at improving the business environment infrastructure, like a technological park in Szczecin and Elbląg, developing an aviation cluster in Rzeszów, and an incubator of entrepreneurship in Białystok.

Some developed cooperation between R&D centres and SMEs in the field of industrial design (Innovative Economy or regional programme of Ślaskie). A number of projects improved the touristic and cultural attractiveness of regions by creating integrated sailing infrastructure in the regions of Pomorskie, Zachodniopomorskie and Podlaskie and common tourist route signs within the Poland – Brandenburg programme.

Investment in the environmental sector meant promotion of green and sustainable growth. Numerous water and sewerage infrastructure projects in both small towns (Mońki) and big agglomerations (Trójmiasto-Sopot) improved the quality of water protection in the basins of the Wisła and Odra Rivers within the Baltic Sea catchment area. Initiatives aimed at biodiversity and environmental protection (information system for monitoring the Baltic Sea,

Innovative Economy; promotion of Natura 2000 in the Wielkopolskie region; a project of the WWF concerning Baltic mammal migration) were realised. Several projects concerned renewable energies: a biogas heat and power plant in Zachodniopomorskie and the Baltic eco-energy cluster in Pomorskie.

Investment in transport infrastructure included development of TEN-T road and railway connections (sections of motorways A1 or railway E65), development of port infrastructure

(Gdynia or Stępnica) and regional and urban transport systems (Hel-Trójmiasto, Kielce).

The OP Human Capital enhanced inclusive growth by realisation of projects supporting apprenticeships and exchanges of employees between R&D centres and companies, creation of cooperation networks, development of Innovation Strategies and reorientation of employees of declining industries (examples from Zachodniopomorskie).

Programme: Innovative Economy

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community National

Priority contribution contribution Total

(€) (€) (€)

Research and development of new 1 117 130 1 314 270

technologies 000 197 140 588 588

1 117 130 1 314 270

R&D infrastructure 000 197 140 588 588

340 000

Capital for innovation 289 000 000 51 000 000 000

2 813 254 3 309 710

Investments in innovative undertakings 000 496 456 588 588

398 997

Diffusion of innovation 339 148 000 59 849 647 647

410 633

Polish economy on the international market 349 038 080 61 594 955 035

Information society establishment and 1 949 985 2 294 100

development 200 344 115 035 235

329 647

Technical assistance 280 200 000 49 447 059 059

8 254 885 1 456 744

Total 280 460 9 711 629

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

R&D, Innovation 6%

11%

0% Energy

0%

0% Transport

Environment

Enterpreneurship, support f or SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, health

83%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF

contribution ERDF contribution

Main EUSBSR to projects to Flagship Projects

ERDF contribution to other projects

support areas realising from the Action realising EUSBSR

EUSBSR Plan of the Strategy (€)

(€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 3 834 799 952 0 3 834 799 952 Energy 0 0 0 Transport 0 0 0 Environment 0 0 0 Entrepreneurship, support for SMEs, human capital 276 648 654 0 276 648 654 Education, tourism, health 499 951 458 0 499 951 458 Total 4 611 400 064 0 4 611 400 064

Programme: Infrastructure & environment (ERDF contribution: €5 737 330 000)

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community National

Priority funding counterpart Total

(€) (€) (€)

2 783 942 3 275 226 Water & sewage management (Cohesion Fund ) 550 491 283 979 529 Waste management & protection of earth 1 215 740 1 430 282 (Cohesion Fund) 049 214 542 362 411 Resource management & environmental risks

(Cohesion Fund) 556 788 510 98 256 796 655 045 306

Adjusting firms to requirements of environmental

protection (ERDF) 200 000 000 467 000 000 667 000 000

Environment protection & promotion of

ecological habits (ERDF) 89 800 000 15 847 059 105 647 059

TEN-T road and air transport network (Cohesion 8 802 366 1 745 929 10 548 295

Fund) 611 233 844

Environmentally-friendly transport (Cohesion 7 676 019 4 385 979 12 061 999

Fund) 211 953 164

Transport safety and national transport networks 2 945 490 3 465 282

(ERDF) 000 519 792 353 353

Energy infrastructure and energy efficiency 1 403 046

(Cohesion Fund) 748 037 701 655 009 248 949

1 693 211

Energy security (ERDF) 974 280 000 718 931 765 765

Culture and cultural heritage (ERDF) 489 970 000 86 465 294 576 435 294

Health safety and health protection system

236 Higher education infrastructure (ERDF) 500 000 000 88 235 294 588 235 294 Technical assistance (ERDF) 187 800 000 33 141 176 220 941 176 Technical assistance (Cohesion Fund) 393 459 142 69 433 966 462 893 108

27 913 683 9 651 611 37 565 295 Total 774 419 193

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

3% R&D, Innovation

0% 13%

Energy 22%

4%

Transport

Environment

Enterpreneurship, support f or SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, health

58%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF

contribution to ERDF contribution

Main EUSBSR projects to Flagship Projects

ERDF contribution

support areas realising from the Action Plan

to other projects

EUSBSR of the Strategy

realising EUSBSR

(€) (€)

(€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 1 949 228 001 1 949 228 001 0 Energy 572 992 783 572 992 783 0 Transport 8 905 613 667 8 905 613 667 0 Environment 3 303 721 628 3 303 721 628 0 Entrepreneurship, support for SMEs, 0 0 0 human capital

Education, tourism, health 412 626 793 412 626 793 0 Total 15 144 182 872 15 144 182 872 0

Programme: Operational Programme Development of Eastern Poland

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community National

Priority funding funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

139 404 929 361 Modern economy 789 957 284 227 511

300 140 Information society infrastructure 255 119 659 45 021 117 776

532 496 Regional growth centres 452 621 636 79 874 407 043

116 537 776 919 Transport infrastructure 660 381 359 887 246

55 882 Sustainable tourism based on natural assets 47 500 000 8 382 353 353

80 251 Technical assistance 68 213 812 12 037 732 544

2 273 793 401 257 2 675 Total 750 723 051 473

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

21% R&D, innovation

32% Energy

0% Transport

Environment

Entrepreneurship, support for SMEs,

human capital

10%

37% Education, tourism, health

0%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF

contribution to ERDF contribution to ERDF contribution to

Main EUSBSR projects Flagship Projects other projects

support areas realising from the Action Plan realising EUSBSR

EUSBSR of the Strategy (€)

(€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 244 697 892 0 244 697 892 Energy 0 0 0 Transport 422 564 569 0 422 564 569 Environment 0 0 0 Entrepreneurship, 114 453 622 0 114 453 622 support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, health 363 534 682 0 363 534 682 Total 667 262 461 0 667 262 461

Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Dolnośląskie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community National

Priority funding counterpart Total

(€) (€) (€)

Enterprises and innovation 309 842 736 151 249 296 461 092 032

Information society 97 051 591 22 835 668 119 887 259

Transport 227 950 624 45 512 610 273 463 234

Environment and ecological safety 128 759 928 23 311 076 152 071 004

Energy 36 394 347 11 649 756 48 044 103

Tourism and culture 108 479 487 26 540 377 135 019

864

Education 99 050 316 21 047 342 120 097

658

Health 52 722 970 11 888 513 64 611 483

Towns 106 867 090 25 800 021 132 667

111

Technical assistance 46 025 790 8 122 199 54 147 989

Total 1 213 144 347 956 858 1 561 101

879 737

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

R&D, Innovation

0%

0% Energy

17%

Transport

38%

12% Environment

Enterpreneurship, support for SMEs, human capital

33% Education, tourism, health

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF ERDF contribution

Main EUSBSR contribution to to Flagship Projects

ERDF contribution

support areas projects realising from the Action

to other projects

EUSBSR Plan of the Strategy realising EUSBSR

(€) (€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 2 517 272 0 2 517 272 Energy 2 203 413 0 2 203 413 Transport 104 033 480 0 104 033 480 Environment 73 130 134 0 73 130 134 Entrepreneurship, 203 808 737 0 203 808 737 support for SMEs, human capital

health Total 181 884 298 0 181 884 298

240 Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Kujawsko-Pomorskie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community National

Priority contribution funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

Development of technical infrastructure 238 701 959 42 123 875 280 825 834

Maintenance and rational utilisation of 117 924 474 20 810 202 138 734 environment 676 Development of social infrastructure 123 630 496 21 817 147 145 447 643 Development of the infrastructure of 57 060 229 10 069 452 67 129 681

information society Increase the competitiveness of companies 252 016 012 44 473 414 296 489 426 Support for the development of tourism 47 550 191 8 391 210 55 941 401 Support for changes in the cities and areas 85 590 344 15 104 178 100 694 requiring renovation 522 Technical assistance 28 530 115 5 034 726 33 564 841 Total 951 003 820 167 824 204 1 118 828 024

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

5% 3% R&D, Innovation

22%

Energy

Transport

40% Environment

22% Enterpreneurship, support for SMEs,

human capital

8% Education, tourism, health

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF contribution ERDF contribution ERDF contribution to Flagship to other projects

Main EUSBSR to projects realising Projects from the realising EUSBSR support areas EUSBSR Action Plan of the (€)

(€) Strategy (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 27 631 715 0 27 631 715 Energy 16 806 097 0 16 806 097 Transport 232 482 019 0 232 482 019 Environment 48 484 934 0 48 484 934 Entrepreneurship, 129 476 650 0 129 476 650 support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, 130 038 337 0 130 038 337

health

Total 584 919 753 0 584 919 753

Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Lubelskie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community National

Priority funding funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

Entrepreneurship and innovation 242 729 455 42 834 610 285 564 065

Economic infrastructure 75 130 546 13 258 331 88 388 877 Attractiveness of urban areas and 69 351 273 12 238 460 81 589 733

investment areas Information society 57 792 728 10 198 717 67 991 445 Transport infrastructure 260 067 274 45 894 225 305 961 499 Environment and clean energy 156 040 364 27 536 535 183 576 899 Culture, tourism and inter-regional 109 806 182 19 377 561 129 183 cooperation 743 Social infrastructure 152 572 800 26 924 612 179 497 412 Technical assistance 32 363 927 5 711 281 38 075 208 Total 1 155 854 203 974 332 1 359 828 549 881

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

11% R&D, innovation

24% 3%

Energy

Transport

Environment

31%

Entrepreneurship, support for SMEs,

19% human capital

Education, tourism, health

12%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR ERDF

ERDF contribution to

Main EUSBSR contribution to Flagship Projects

ERDF contribution to other projects

support areas projects realising from the Action EUSBSR Plan of the realising EUSBSR

(€) Strategy (€)

(€) 1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 60 724 748 0 60 724 748 Energy 14 488 883 0 14 488 883 Transport 164 853 110 0 164 853 110 Environment 62 154 602 0 62 154 602 Entrepreneurship, 104 073 515 0 104 073 515 support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, 129 873 800 0 129 873 800

health

Total 536 168 658 0 536 168 658

Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Lubuskie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

EU National

Priority contribution funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

Development of infrastructure to enhance 146 863 974 25 917 172 172 781 the competitiveness of the region 146 Stimulating investment growth in 99 907 448 17 630 727 117 538 enterprises and strengthening the innovation 175

potential Protection and management of the resources 69 937 342 12 341 884 82 279 226 of the natural environment Development and modernisation of social 73 543 153 12 978 204 86 521 357 infrastructure Development and modernisation of tourism 35 745 986 6 308 116 42 052 102 and culture infrastructure Technical assistance 13 175 193 2 325 035 15 500 228 Total 439 173 096 77 501 138 516 674 234

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

No data provided by the region

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

No data provided by the region

Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Łódzkie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community National

Priority funding funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

Transport infrastructure 241 531 418 42 623 191 284 154 609

Environmental protection, prevention of 171 084 755 30 191 427 201 276 threats, energy 182 Economy, innovativeness, entrepreneurship 271 722 846 146 312 302 418 035 148 Information society 70 446 664 12 431 764 82 878 428 Social infrastructure 120 765 709 21 311 596 142 077 305 Revitalisation of urban areas 100 638 091 17 759 663 118 397 754 Technical assistance 30 191 427 5 327 899 35 519 326 Total 1 006 380 275 957 842 1 282 338 910 752

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

0% 4%

23%

R&D, innovation

Energy

38% Transport

Environment

Entrepreneurship, support for SMEs, human

18% capital

Education, tourism, health

17%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF ERDF contribution

Main EUSBSR contribution to to Flagship Projects

ERDF contribution

support areas projects realising from the Action

to other projects

EUSBSR Plan of the Strategy realising EUSBSR

(€) (€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 2 196 291 0 2 196 291 Energy 25 210 203 0 25 210 203 Transport 216 245 385 0 216 245 385 Environment 97 254 564 0 97 254 564 Entrepreneurship, 106 975 768 0 106 975 768 support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, 131 746 313 0 131 746 313

health

Total 579 628 525 0 579 628 525

Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Małopolskie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding EU National

Priority contribution funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

Conditions for the development of the 162 841 230 28 736 688 191 577 knowledge society 918 Increasing regional economic opportunities 160 708 698 28 360 358 189 069 056 Tourism and cultural industry 101 004 036 17 824 242 118 828 278 Infrastructure for economic development 390 836 457 68 971 140 459 807 597 Kraków Metropolitan Area 171 897 053 30 334 774 202 231 827 Intra-regional cohesion 155 981 854 27 526 210 183 508 064 Infrastructure for environmental protection 93 003 516 16 412 385 109 415 901 Trans-regional cooperation 10 000 399 1 764 776 11 765 175 Technical assistance 44 001 159 7 764 910 51 766 069 Total 1 290 274 227 695 483 1 517 969 402 885

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

26%

R&D, Innovation 19%

Energy

Transport 4%

6% Environment 3%

Enterpreneurship, support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, health

42%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF

contribution ERDF contribution ERDF contribution to

Main EUSBSR support to projects to Flagship Projects other projects

areas realising from the Action realising EUSBSR

EUSBSR Plan of the Strategy (€)

(€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 34 440 160 0 34 440 160 Energy 25 521 813 0 25 521 813 Transport 314 999 128 0 314 999 128 Environment 42 412 758 0 42 412 758 Entrepreneurship, 147 417 968 0 147 417 968 support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, 203 233 591 0 203 233 591

health

Total 768 025 418 0 768 025 418

Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Mazowieckie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding Community National

Priority funding funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

Creating conditions for the development of 430 401 731 75 953 247 506 354 innovation potential and entrepreneurship in 978

Mazovia Accelerating the e-development of Mazovia 205 127 627 36 198 993 241 326 620 Regional transport system 538 460 023 95 022 357 633 482 380 Environment, prevention of threats, energy 197 801 647 34 906 173 232 707 820 Strengthening the role of cities in the 89 743 340 15 837 060 105 580 development of the region 400 Making use of nature and culture areas for 150 182 726 26 502 834 176 685 development of tourism and recreation 560 Creating and improving conditions for 164 834 703 29 088 477 193 923 human capital development 180 Technical assistance 54 944 901 9 696 159 64 641 060 Total 1 831 496 323 205 300 2 154 701 698 998

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

3%

0% R&D, innovation

22%

Energy

Transport

45% Environment

22% Entrepreneurship, support for

SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, health

8%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF

contribution ERDF contribution

Main EUSBSR support to projects to Flagship Projects

ERDF contribution

areas realising from the Action

to other projects realising EUSBSR

EUSBSR Plan of the Strategy (€)

(€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 28 215 060 0 28 215 060 Energy 0 0 0 Transport 398 020 013 0 398 020 013 Environment 75 009 055 0 75 009 055 Entrepreneurship, 198 266 489 0 198 266 489 support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, 191 702 136 0 191 702 136

health

Total 891 212 753 0 891 212 753

Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Opolskie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community

Priority funding

National

(ERDF) funding

Total

(€) (€)

(€)

Strengthening the economic attractiveness 158 043 581 27 890 044 185 933 of the region 625 Information society 25 628 689 4 522 710 30 151 399 Transport 111 057 652 19 598 410 130 656 062 Environmental protection 42 714 481 7 537 849 50 252 330 Social infrastructure and higher education 42 714 481 7 537 849 50 252 330 Mobilisation of municipal and degraded 34 171 585 6 030 280 40 201 865

areas Technical assistance 12 814 344 2 261 355 15 075 699 Total 427 144 813 75 378 497 502 523 310

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

11% 18%

3% R&D, Innovation

Energy

Transport

Environm ent

25% 33%

Ente rprene urship, s upport for SM Es, hum an capital Education, tourism , health

10%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF ERDF contribution ERDF contribution

Main EUSBSR contribution to to Flagship Projects to other projects

support areas projects realising from the Action EUSBSR Plan of the Strategy realising EUSBSR

(€) (€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 37 849 471 0 37 849 471 Energy 10 623 923 0 10 623 923 Transport 110 798 161 0 110 798 161 Environment 32 403 525 0 32 403 525 Entrepreneurship, 84 557 974 0 84 557 974 support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, 59 065 073 0 59 065 073

health

Total 335 298 128 0 335 298 128

Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Podkarpackie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community

Priority funding National funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

Competitive and innovative economy 288 640 033 64 170 596 352 810 629

Technical infrastructure 341 083 247 60 191 162 401 274 409

Information society 67 987 570 11 997 806 79 985 376 Environment protection and risk 170 446 174 30 078 736 200 524 prevention 910 Public infrastructure 120 448 629 21 255 640 141 704 269 Tourism and culture 37 071 388 6 542 010 43 613 398 Intra-regional cohesion 79 541 547 14 036 744 93 578 291 Technical assistance 31 089 235 0 31 089 235 Total 1 136 307 208 272 694 1 344 580 823 517

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

10% 17%

5% R&D, Innovation

Energy

Transport 14%

Environment

Enterpreneurship, support for SMEs,

37% human capital

Education, tourism, health 17%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF ERDF contribution

Main EUSBSR contribution to to Flagship Projects

ERDF contribution

support areas projects realising from Action Plan of

to other projects

EUSBSR the Strategy realising EUSBSR

(€) (€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 73 855 158 0 73 855 158 Energy 38 196 261 0 38 196 261 Transport 279 001 284 0 279 001 284 Environment 122 830 343 0 122 830 343 Entrepreneurship, 101 843 971 0 101 843 971 support for SMEs, human capital

health Total 738 753 757 0 738 753 757

251 Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Podlaskie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding Community National

Priority funding funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

Increase innovation and support for 139 965 734 11 114 926 151 080 entrepreneurship in the region 660 Development of transport infrastructure 203 586 523 53 287 126 256 873 649 Development of tourism and culture 101 793 261 18 861 692 120 654 953 Information society 50 896 631 8 981 758 59 878 389 Development of infrastructure for 63 620 788 11 227 198 74 847 986

environmental protection Social infrastructure development 50 896 631 7 739 928 58 636 559 Technical assistance 25 448 315 2 827 591 28 275 906 Total 636 207 883 114 040 219 750 248 102

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

1%

1%

18% R&D, Innovation

Energy

Transport

49% Environment

26% Enterpreneurship, support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, health

5%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF ERDF contribution

Main EUSBSR contribution to to Flagship Projects

ERDF contribution to other projects

support areas projects realising from the Action EUSBSR Plan of the Strategy realising EUSBSR

(€) (€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 6 248 614 0 6 248 614 Energy 3 329 834 0 3 329 834 Transport 204 880 729 0 204 880 729 Environment 23 061 073 0 23 061 073 Entrepreneurship, 110 067 378 0 110 067 378 support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, 75 002 851 0 75 002 851

health

Total 422 590 480 0 422 590 480

Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Pomorskie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community National

Priority funding funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

SME development and innovation 185 863 810 123 909 206 309 773 016

Knowledge society 61 954 603 20 651 534 82 606 137 Urban and metropolitan functions 106 207 892 45 517 668 151 725 560 Regional transport system 203 565 125 67 855 042 271 420 167 Environment and environmentally friendly 61 954 604 20 651 535 82 606 139

energy Tourism and cultural heritage 44 253 288 14 751 096 59 004 384 Health protection and emergency systems 35 402 630 11 800 877 47 203 507 Local basic infrastructure 123 909 207 21 866 331 145 775 538 Local social infrastructure and civil 35 402 630 6 247 523 41 650 153 initiatives Technical assistance 26 551 973 8 850 658 35 402 631 Total 885 065 762 342 101 470 1 227 167 232

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

16% 15% R&D, Innovation

4% Energy

Transport 15%

Environment

Enterpreneurship, support for SMEs, human capital

12% 38%

Education, tourism, health

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF ERDF contribution

Main EUSBSR contribution to to Flagship Projects

ERDF contribution

support areas projects realising from the Action

to other projects

EUSBSR Plan of the Strategy realising EUSBSR

(€) (€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 103 812 816 0 103 812 816 Energy 29 696 017 0 29 696 017 Transport 273 359 869 0 273 359 869 Environment 81 425 824 0 81 425 824 Entrepreneurship, 105 516 646 0 105 516 646 support for SMEs, human capital

health Total 707 767 341 0 707 767 341

254 Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Śląskie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community National

Priority funding funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

Research and development, innovation, 296 238 553 52 277 392 348 515 entrepreneurship 945 Information society 150 000 000 26 470 588 176 470 588 Tourism 110 420 000 19 485 882 129 905 882 Culture 53 274 150 9 401 321 62 675 471 Environment 180 678 600 31 884 459 212 563 059 Sustainable urban development 312 802 445 55 200 431 368 002 876 Transport 426 327 555 84 244 367 510 571 922 Education infrastructure 82 480 000 14 555 294 97 035 294 Health and recreation 57 759 000 10 192 765 67 951 765 Technical assistance 43 000 000 0 43 000 000 Total 1 712 980 303 712 499 2 016 692 303 802

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

2% 2%

R&D, Innovation

27%

Energy

37% Transport

Environment

Enterpreneurship, support f or SMEs, human capital

18% Education, tourism, health

14%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF ERDF contribution ERDF contribution

Main EUSBSR contribution to to Flagship Projects to other projects

support areas projects realising from the Action EUSBSR Plan of the Strategy realising EUSBSR

(€) (€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 15 809 092 0 15 809 092 Energy 10 536 384 0 10 536 384 Transport 244 370 087 0 244 370 087 Environment 95 406 855 0 95 406 855 Entrepreneurship, 117 141 495 0 117 141 495 support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, 180 532 392 0 180 532 392

health

Total 663 796 306 0 663 796 306

Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Świętokrzyskie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community National

Priority funding funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

Business development 130 645 308 23 055 056 153 700 364

Support for innovation, fostering of the 108 871 090 19 212 545 128 083 information society and increase of the 635

investment potential of the region Increasing the quality of communication 180 026 034 31 769 300 211 795 systems in the region 334 Development of infrastructure for 101 096 872 17 840 624 118 937 environment protection and energy 496 Increasing the quality of public 108 871 090 19 212 545 128 083 infrastructure and investment in cultural 635 heritage, tourism and sports Reinforcement of cities and revitalisation of 74 522 654 13 151 057 87 673 711 small towns Technical assistance 21 774 218 3 842 509 25 616 727 Total 725 807 266 128 083 636 853 890 902 Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

1%

0%

27% R&D, innovation

29%

Energy

Transport

Environment

Entrepreneurship, support for SMEs, human capital

13% Education, tourism, health

30%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF ERDF contribution

Main EUSBSR contribution to to Flagship Projects

ERDF contribution

support areas projects realising Action Plan of the

to other projects

EUSBSR Strategy realising EUSBSR

(€) (€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 4 336 942 0 4 336 942 Energy 835 957 0 835 957 Transport 97 799 710 0 97 799 710 Environment 46 851 750 0 46 851 750 Entrepreneurship, 102 290 260 0 102 290 260 support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, 95 545 201 0 95 545 201

health

Total 347 659 820 0 347 659 820

Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Warmińsko-Mazurskie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community

Priority funding

National

(ERDF) funding

Total

(€) (€)

(€)

Entrepreneurship 207 308 408 31 289 721 238 598 129 Tourism 134 750 465 23 779 510 158 529 975 Social infrastructure 62 192 522 10 975 151 73 167 673 Development, restructuring and 82 923 363 14 633 535 97 556 898

revitalization of towns Regional and local transport 352 424 294 78 099 272 430 523 566 infrastructure Nature and environment 93 288 784 22 165 660 115 454 444 Information society infrastructure 62 192 522 10 975 151 73 167 673 Technical assistance 41 461 683 0 41 461 683 Total 1 036 542 191 918 000 1 228 460 041 041

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

8%

21% 2% R&D, Innovation

Energy

Transport

33% Environment

Enterpreneurship, support for SMEs,

27% human capital

Education, tourism, health

9%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF ERDF contribution ERDF contribution

Main EUSBSR contribution to to Flagship Projects to other projects

support areas projects realising from the Action EUSBSR Plan of the Strategy realising EUSBSR

(€) (€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 46 942 409 0 46 942 409 Energy 11 814 879 0 11 814 879 Transport 183 674 495 0 183 674 495 Environment 53 245 565 0 53 245 565 Entrepreneurship, 153 368 085 0 153 368 085 support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, 120 104 310 0 120 104 310

health

Total 569 149 743 0 569 149 743

Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Wielkopolskie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community

Priority funding National funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

Competitiveness of enterprises 328 887 000 170 089 225 498 976 225 Communication infrastructure 493 361 547 120 265 920 613 627 467 Environment 173 821 000 43 024 098 216 845 098 Revitalization of problem areas 54 060 000 18 020 000 72 080 000 Infrastructure for human capital 121 284 097 38 174 052 159 458 149 Tourism and cultural environment 61 470 000 25 648 922 87 118 922 Technical assistance 39 909 000 0 39 909 000 Total 1 272 792 644 415 222 217 1 688 014 861

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

1% 5%

14% R&D, Innovation

Energy

Transport

40%

27% Environment

Enterpreneurship, support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, health

13%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF ERDF contribution

Main EUSBSR contribution to to Flagship Projects

ERDF contribution

support areas projects realising from the Action

to other projects

EUSBSR Plan of the Strategy realising EUSBSR

(€) (€) (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 13 455 340 0 13 455 340 Energy 46 326 827 0 46 326 827 Transport 410 404 993 0 410 404 993 Environment 133 782 337 0 133 782 337 Entrepreneurship, 276 308 688 0 276 308 688 support for SMEs, human capital

health Total 1 021 651 391 0 1 021 651 391

260 Programme: Regional Operational Programme for Zachodniopomorskie

Priorities of the programme and allocated funding

Community National

Priority funding funding Total

(€) (€) (€)

Economy, innovation, technology 232 753 899 41 074 217 273 828 116 Development of transport and energy 215 789 475 43 977 715 259 767 190

infrastructure Development of the information society 42 000 000 7 411 764 49 411 764 Infrastructure for environmental protection 61 280 000 10 814 117 72 094 117 Tourism, culture and revitalisation 74 935 655 13 223 939 88 159 594 Development of metropolitan functions 116 780 745 20 608 366 137 389 111 Development of social infrastructure and 58 480 000 10 320 000 68 800 000 health care Technical assistance 33 417 525 0 33 417 525 Total 835 437 299 147 430 118 982 867 417

Programme contribution to EUSBSR by area of support

ERDF investments realising EUSBSR

12% 19%

0% R&D, innovation

Energy

Transport

Environment

36%

29% Entrepreneurship, support for SMEs, human capital

Education, tourism, health

4%

Programme contribution to EUSBSR

ERDF ERDF contribution to ERDF contribution to

Main EUSBSR contribution to Flagship Projects other projects

support areas projects realising from the Action Plan EUSBSR of the Strategy realising

(€) (€) EUSBSR (€)

1 2=3+4 3 4 R&D, innovation 55 984 158 0 55 984 158 Energy 2 266 129 0 2 266 129 Transport 172 095 680 0 172 095 680 Environment 21 787 418 0 21 787 418 Entrepreneurship, 140 714 037 0 140 714 037 support for SMEs, human capital

health Total 252 133 385 0 252 133 385

262

3.1.8. Sweden (Total area: 441 370 km 2 - Population: 9 340 682 inhabitants)

3.1.8.1. Analytical summary

In Sweden there are eight regional ERDF competitiveness and employment programmes and one national ESF programme. Sweden participates in 13 European territorial cooperation programmes. In March 2011 about €180 million or 20% of the ERDF Regional competitiveness and employment budget was still available for new projects.

An additional selection criterion linked to the Baltic Sea Strategy was introduced in the autumn of 2009 for all eight ERDF Regional Operational Programmes in Sweden and as from 2010, classification of all new projects has been carried out. So far, most projects have been classified as ‘in line with the Baltic Sea Strategy’ (126 out of 250 projects approved in 2010, equalling €90 million out of €180 million) with the bulk (91 out of 126 projects) in the second pillar, while there has been no funding decided from the programmes directly for Flagship Projects.

The Managing Authority has organised internal and external information actions to promote the Strategy and increase the knowledge of the funding opportunities offered by the ERDF Regional Operational Programmes. The activities to implement the Strategy on the ground are still in their early stages, but stakeholders and actors at both national and regional levels are becoming more positive and consider the Strategy as a good basis for increased international cooperation and creating networks between actors at different levels within and between the Member States.

No specific problems have been mentioned in the report but it takes time to find partners and set up projects, and it will take time for the cooperation to mature and reach its full potential.

With regard to the next programme period, it is the view of the Swedish Government that, "Where they exist, macro-regional strategies should be taken into account in all cohesion policy programmes." This should contribute to a more effective and focused use of the Community funding.

3.1.8.2. Description of the eight ERDF competitiveness and employment programmes contribution to the Strategy

All statistics in this chapter refer to projects approved in 2010 (but not all approved projects were registered in regard to the Baltic Sea Strategy in time to be included in the report from the Managing Authority). In order to make feedback and follow-up on the regional implementation of the Baltic Sea Strategy possible, all projects are registered at the Managing Authority according to the following classification:

  • 1. 
    Flagship
  • 2. 
    Cooperation with Flagship
  • 3. 
    Cooperation partner in another country in the Baltic Sea Region
  • 4. 
    In line with the Baltic Sea Region Strategy
  • 5. 
    Not contributing to the Strategy

3.1.8.2.1. Upper North Sweden

Total budget: €242 million

Geographical coverage: Counties of Norrbotten and Västerbotten

Priority areas: Innovation and Renewal, Accessibility

Commitment rate in March 2011: 98%

Main contributions to the following priority areas of the Strategy: Transport, Innovation, R&D

• Selection criteria included in the autumn of 2009. • In 2010, 69% of the committed funding was in line with or contributing to the

Strategy.

• The Managing Authority has organised internal and external information actions to

promote the Strategy and increase knowledge of the funding opportunities offered by

the ERDF Regional Operational Programmes.

• The Managing Authority has also arranged two information meetings together with

Interreg IVA North. This was done to encourage projects with links to the Baltic Sea Region Strategy in the action areas of innovation and infrastructure. In the first application round in 2011, projects linked to the Baltic Sea Region Strategy are

prioritised.

Upper North Sweden, ERDF budget in €, TA not included

Allocated to Priority area Budget projects Remaining Innovation and renewal 177 125 070 180 667 571 -3 542 501

Accessibility 55 806 529 49 109 746 6 696 783

264 Country Sweden

Objective Regional competitiveness and employment Programme Upper North Sweden

Total ERDF amount for the 242 637 082 programme in €, including TA

Main priority areas of the ERDF amount for EDRF amount ERDF amount Strategy projects in line financing for other with the Strategy Flagship projects Projects contributing to identified in the the Strategy Strategy’s Action Plan R&D (priority area 7) 11 262 636 Innovation (priority area 8) 16 146 356 Energy (priority area 10) Transport (priority area 11) 16 087 604 Environment 3 938 622 (priority areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 13) An accessible and attractive region (priority area 12) 5 867 180 A safe and secure region (priority area 14) 834 667 Total ERDF 54 137 065 No registration* 13 362 536 Total ERDF 68 334 267 0 0

  • Projects not yet registered under Baltic Sea Region Strategy

Upper North Sweden

3.1.8.2.2. Mid North Sweden

Total budget: €177 million

Geographical coverage: Counties of Jämtland and Västernorrland

Priority areas: Renewal of industry, energy and environment-driven development, Accessibility and attractiveness

Commitment rate in March 2011: 88%

Main contributions to the following priority areas of the Strategy: An accessible and attractive place, Innovation, Environment

• Selection criteria included in the autumn of 2009. • In 2010 47% of the committed funding was in line with or contributing to the Strategy. • The Managing Authority has organised internal and external information actions to

promote the Strategy and increase knowledge of the funding opportunities offered by the ERDF Regional Operational Programmes.

• The Managing Authority has established contact with a project partner in Estonia, and

the possibility of cooperation under Article 37(6)(b) (1083/2006) is now being discussed.

Mid North Sweden, ERDF budget in €, TA not included

Allocated to Priority area Budget projects Remaining Renewal of industry, energy and environment-driven development 130 520 537 114 858 073 15 662 464 Accessibility and attractiveness 39 032 585 35 519 652 3 512 933 Total 169 553 122 150 377 725 19 175 397

Country Sweden Objective Regional competitiveness and employment Programme Mid North Sweden

Total ERDF amount for the 176 617 833 programme in €, including TA

Main priority areas of the ERDF amount for EDRF amount ERDF amount Strategy projects in line financing for other with the Strategy Flagship projects Projects contributing to identified in the the Strategy Strategy’s Action Plan R&D (priority area 7) Innovation (priority area 8) 3 338 821 Energy (priority area 10) Transport (priority area 11) 764 414

(priority areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 13)

266 A prosperous place

(priority area 6) An accessible and attractive place (priority area 12) 4 671 539 Total ERDF 9 985 885 No registration* 8 445 897 Total ERDF 23 103 321 0 0

  • Projects not yet registered under Baltic Sea Region Strategy

    Mid North Sweden 3.1.8.2.3. North Mid Sweden

Total budget: €195 million

Geographical coverage: Counties of Gävleborg, Dalarna and Värmland

Priority areas: Business development, Accessibility

Commitment rate in March 2011: 98%

Main contributions to the following priority areas of the Strategy: Innovation, R&D, Transport

• Selection criteria included in the autumn of 2009. • In 2010 17% of the committed funding was in line with or contributing to the Strategy. • The Managing Authority has organised internal and external information actions to

promote the Strategy and increase knowledge of the funding opportunities offered by

the ERDF Regional Operational Programmes.

• A project has been financed to develop an exhibition on the Baltic Sea Region

Strategy.

North Mid Sweden, ERDF budget in €, TA not included

Priority area Budget Allocated to projects Remaining

Business development 132 188 324 128 222 674 3 965 650 Accessibility 55 000 000 55 550 000 -550 000 Total 187 188 324 183 772 674 3 415 650

Country Sweden Objective Regional competitiveness and employment Programme North Mid Sweden

Total ERDF amount for the 194 987 837 programme in €, including TA

Main priority areas of the ERDF amount for EDRF amount ERDF amount Strategy projects in line financing for other with the Strategy Flagship projects Projects contributing to identified in the the Strategy Strategy’s Action Plan R&D (priority area 7) 888 889 Innovation (priority area 8) 2 715 111 2 333 333 Energy (priority area 10) Transport (priority area 11) 206 721 Environment (priority areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 13) Total ERDF 3 810 721 0 2 333 333 No registration* 6 479 642 Total ERDF 10 497 085 0 2 333 333 * Projects not yet registered under Baltic Sea Region Strategy North Mid Sweden

3.1.8.2.4. East Mid Sweden

Total budget: €81 million

Geographical coverage: Counties of Uppsala, Södermanland, Östergötland, Örebro and

Västmanland

Priority areas: Innovative environments, Business development, Accessibility

Commitment rate in March 2011: 80%

Main contributions to the following priority areas of the Strategy: R&D, Innovation, Transport

• Selection criteria included in the autumn of 2009. • In 2010 76% of the committed funding was in line with or contributing to the Strategy. • The Managing Authority has organised internal and external information actions to

promote the Strategy and increase knowledge of the funding opportunities offered by

the ERDF Regional Operational Programmes.

• During the application period from August to September, projects which are in line

with the Baltic Sea Region Strategy are prioritised for the programme in East Mid

Sweden.

East Mid Sweden, ERDF budget in €, TA not included

Priority area Budget Allocated to projects Remaining Innovative environments 23 336 267 20 302 552 3 033 715 Business development 38 893 779 29 948 210 8 945 569 Accessibility 15 557 512 11 979 284 3 578 228 Total 77 787 558 62 230 046 15 557 512

Country Sweden Objective Regional competitiveness and employment Programme Eastern Mid Sweden

programme in €, including TA

269 Main priority areas of the ERDF amount for EDRF amount ERDF amount

Strategy projects in line financing for other with the Strategy Flagship projects Projects contributing to identified in the the Strategy Strategy’s Action

Plan R&D (priority area 7) 5 364 358

Innovation (priority area 8) 3 920 831 Energy (priority area 10) Transport (priority area 11) 3 399 207 Environment (priority areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 13) Total ERDF 12 684 396 No registration* 0 Total ERDF 12 684 396 0 0

  • Projects not yet registered under Baltic Sea Region Strategy

East Mid Sweden

2.

Originele weergave

afbeelding document
 
 
 
 

3.

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